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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exciting Stuff
This book had my heart pounding from the start to the finish. it is a fantastic, enthralling adventure filled with ingenius characters!
Published on 27 Jan. 2005 by Mr. J. Churchill-moss

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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Aimless and disappointing
This is the third book of the quartet and in it Ian Irvine is again faced with the task of moving his characters around from the situation he last left them in. After the catastrohpic events at Katazza at the end of the second book, the characters regroup and head out of the Dry Sea. Rulke's plans move forward and his influence over Llian grows.
It's a difficult...
Published on 10 Jan. 2004 by Andy Barkham


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exciting Stuff, 27 Jan. 2005
This book had my heart pounding from the start to the finish. it is a fantastic, enthralling adventure filled with ingenius characters!
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Irvine's 'Mirror' quartet just gets better and better, 15 May 2001
You can almost feel Irvine developing in stature as this quartet unfolds. The complexity of the plot and the depth of the characterisation continue to grow with the telling.
For me the attraction of these stories, apart from the richness of the world(s) Irvine creates, is the realism of the characters. There is no black and white here. The heroes and heroines are not all good, the malevolents not all bad - and it's often hard to work out which is which!
Set against an evocative backdrop, this volume reveals more about the characters already introduced; their story, their history, their hopes and their fears.
Has Llian sold out to Rulke? Will Karan betray Llian? What is Shand's secret past? Will Maigraith emerge from Faelamor's domination? Can Mendark regain his authority? Find out the answers to some of these questions in Dark is the Moon.
I can't wait for the (concluding?) instalment.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great book if you like fantasy, 25 July 2013
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I think Jan Irvine require no recommendation, he is a brilliant writer and this volume is just another example of it. Brilliant story.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best series i've ever read, 28 Sept. 2001
By A Customer
Well, if what you want out of a book is infallable charecters, or a very straight battle of good Vs evil then this book, indeed this series is not for you.
However if what you want is a compelling read, charecters who have faults, charecters who are human, then this is a series for you.
I really can't recommend this book, and this series enough, even though i finished the series 4 months ago, the book, and its charecters, still stay with me.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars In the same vein..., 3 April 2003
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This is the third book in The View from the Mirror tetralogy (after A Shadow on the Glass and The Tower on the Rift, and before The Way Between the Worlds).
Dark Is the Moon starts in the tower of Katazza, where Tensor has just opened a gate to the Nightland. In the process, Rulke the Charon has managed to escape from his imprisonment of a thousand years, while Karan and Llian have been sucked throught the gate. Mendark, Malien, Tallia and Yggur have to overcome their differences and ally against their common enemy and try to use the power of the Rift to seal the Nightland. Karan and Llian's lives are at stake.
And so in the Nightland, Karan and Llian have no choice but to team with Rulke, or they'll be trapped forever. But in the battle, the new alliance draws to much power from the Rift and Katazza collapses over them. Thanks to that diversion, Karan manages to escape throught the gate and lands in the rubble of the destroyed citadel. However, Llian is still stuck with Rulke, who compels him to tell the Histories but finally lets him go five days later. When with Karan they catch up with Yggur, Mendark, Shand and the others, everyone suspects he's become Rulke's spy.
After crossing the Dry Sea again, the group realizes that their only chance to beat Rulke is to make a replica of the golden Flute, a legendary artifact that is said to have the power to open the Way between the Worlds. But for this they need Aachan red gold, which is extremely rare, and information on how to use the instrument.
In this thrid volume, all roads diverge, to converge again at the end for another confrontation: Mendark sets off to Havissard in search of the gold, Yggur goes back to Thurkad where his army is at war, Tallia and Shand go look for young Lilis's father, and Karan wants to go back to her estate in Gothryme to see how her people are faring. Llian accompanies her, and on the way they stop in Chanthed, where lies the College of the Histories, and where he thinks he might gather new information for his Great Tale.
In the meantime Faellamor, with the help of her always faithful Maigraith, is searching for a way to break the Forbidding and tries to link with fher far away kin, the Faellem, and ask them for help. They manage to open a gate to Havissard.
Dark is the Moon is of the same quality as the previous books in the series, that is, full of entertaining adventures and well written, but nothing outstanding, although the characters have started to grow in depth, and me to consider reading Ian Irvine's next series, The Well of Echoes. But on to the fourth and final volume first.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At Last a SCIFI review., 7 Feb. 2009
By 
Eric Beckett "EBSCIFIFAN" (Humberston, Grimsby,N.E.Lincs) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This book was a present to myself, because I deserved it. I'm an avid reader of SCIFI although I do read other stuff eg Historical Novels and some mystery and suspense. I find all Ian Irvine books extremely good reading and at the moment I have at least four of his books waiting to be read, and plan on buying several more. Top class and the Amazon service is truley fist class too. May I also recommend books by Trudi Canavan- "The Magicians' Guild", book 1 of "The Black Magician Triology. Yes this is a Fantasy Novel but I forgot to mention that I'm into that too. Hope this is a help to some of you readers out there.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Aimless and disappointing, 10 Jan. 2004
By 
Andy Barkham "pandion1" (1picard) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is the third book of the quartet and in it Ian Irvine is again faced with the task of moving his characters around from the situation he last left them in. After the catastrohpic events at Katazza at the end of the second book, the characters regroup and head out of the Dry Sea. Rulke's plans move forward and his influence over Llian grows.
It's a difficult book to summarise as the characters wander around almost aimlessly. Events occur but without the sense of urgency from previous books. Irvine still swicthes between the characters with skill, but this time it seems clumsy - as shown by the amount of skipping backwards and forwards in time that takes place. This is a transition novel - and it feels like it. The sense of purpose that the characters had in the previous novels is lacking. With it goes the pace and, frankly, the interest. Whereas previously Llian and Karan were fighting against all the odds despite their personal quirks, now they're just becoming tedious and desperately in need of a good shaking.
Irvine's text is still well-written and the characters well drawn, but compared to the previous 2 novels, this one is extremely weak.
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3 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Have I read the same book?, 5 Sept. 2001
By A Customer
Irvine fans must be monopolizing these pages. I went painfully through the first two books, but the third one definitely killed me: predictable plot, bleak and shallow world construction, magic system to laugh at. If all you care for is characters study, why writing fantasy?
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Dark is the Moon (View from the Mirror)
Dark is the Moon (View from the Mirror) by Ian Irvine (Mass Market Paperback - 1 July 2002)
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