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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A ripping yarn
What can I say... The title of this book caught my attention at a local book sale. It is an over the top adventure story in the Indiana Jones vein, told through the eyes of Ameilia Peabody, Although Emerson must be a much more impressive specimen of manhood according to descriptions his wife gives. The adventure contains warring arab tribes poisoned camels secret...
Published on 4 Feb. 2003 by John Crombie

versus
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars what a disappointment
I had read several good - even enthusiastic - reviews of this book and was looking forward to reading it, especially since I know the country quite well! But what a disappointment - it was truly just plain 'stupid'.
Published 21 months ago by Jeanne Moller


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A ripping yarn, 4 Feb. 2003
By 
John Crombie (Holywood, County Down United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
What can I say... The title of this book caught my attention at a local book sale. It is an over the top adventure story in the Indiana Jones vein, told through the eyes of Ameilia Peabody, Although Emerson must be a much more impressive specimen of manhood according to descriptions his wife gives. The adventure contains warring arab tribes poisoned camels secret civilisations and naturally hidden passages.
Good fun holiday reading. This book doesn't tax the brain at all.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars extremely funny, romantic, and lots of suspense, 16 Feb. 2002
I have enjoyed all the Peabody books but this one is my favourite. The writing is very funny and very tongue-in-cheek. The difference between this book and the other Peabody novels is that the story takes after the romantic classics as written by H. Rider Haggard (as mrs Peters mentions in her Acknowledgements). The result is a mixture of the usual elements , the incredibly funny characters of Amelia, Emerson, and (even more so) Ramses, with a romantic suspense story in which they are kept prisoner by an undiscovered Nubian tribe with two princes warring for the crown!Of course it all ends well and the Emersons even acquire an adopted daughter! It is a very funny, very romantic and very interesting (lots of historic detail) story. Highly recommended!
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An exciting Amelia Peabody adventure in an exotic location, 13 Mar. 2002
By A Customer
The seemingly low-key opening to this book - the sudden, and uncharacteristically silent, death of a camel, introduces one of the best Amelia Peabody adventures.
Set in Nubia, conventional archaeology takes a back seat, despite the irritating presence, to Amelia and Emerson, of Budge of the British Museum. Amelia, Emerson, Ramses and the mysterious Kemet are persuaded to set off into the desert, with a doubtful map, in search of Lord Blacktower's missing heir and his wife and his younger son who has recently disappeared too.
One by one the camels die despite Amelia's ministrations and then all their men, except for Kemet, desert them leaving them in grave danger. Undaunted, they carry on on foot. Then Kemet disappears and all seems lost.....
As the story unfolds, Elizabeth Peters presents us with a fascinating cast of exotic characters, heroes and villains, and the adventure is exciting and unusual. Her recreation of Victorian manners, speech and attitudes is, as usual, so masterly that we are immersed in the period.
Don't miss the fun!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sixth book in this Excellent Series, 20 Jun. 2007
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Elizabeth Peters was born and brought up in Illinois and earned her Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of Chicago's famed Oriental Institute. Peters was named Grand Master at the inaugural Anthony Awards in 1986 and Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America at the Edgar Awards in 1998. She lives in a historic farmhouse in western Maryland.

The Amelia Peabody books may or may not be an acquired taste, personally I love them. They are set in Victorian times when there were still very strict rules of etiquette and polite behaviour was the norm. Although most of the books are set in Egypt, in the desert under very trying conditions and extremely hot weather the `English' way of life was still expected to be adhered to, sometimes with quite hilarious consequences.

Amelia Peabody is Elizabeth Peters' best loved and brilliant creation, a thoroughly Victorian feminist who takes the stuffy world of archaeology by storm with her no nonsense dress sense and forthright opinions.

Egyptologist Amelia Peabody along with her husband Emerson, perhaps the most famous archaeologist of his day and their son Ramses are in the Sudan searching for Viscount Blacktower's son and his new bride. As trouble follows them everywhere it is not long before they are caught up in a web of deceit and treachery. Once again their survival depends upon Peabody's powers of deduction, Ramses ability to look like one of the natives and Emerson's ability to frighten anybody and everybody who gets in his way.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sixth book in this Excellent Series, 20 Jun. 2007
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Elizabeth Peters was born and brought up in Illinois and earned her Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of Chicago's famed Oriental Institute. Peters was named Grand Master at the inaugural Anthony Awards in 1986 and Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America at the Edgar Awards in 1998. She lives in a historic farmhouse in western Maryland.

The Amelia Peabody books may or may not be an acquired taste, personally I love them. They are set in Victorian times when there were still very strict rules of etiquette and polite behaviour was the norm. Although most of the books are set in Egypt, in the desert under very trying conditions and extremely hot weather the `English' way of life was still expected to be adhered to, sometimes with quite hilarious consequences.

Amelia Peabody is Elizabeth Peters' best loved and brilliant creation, a thoroughly Victorian feminist who takes the stuffy world of archaeology by storm with her no nonsense dress sense and forthright opinions.

Egyptologist Amelia Peabody along with her husband Emerson, perhaps the most famous archaeologist of his day and their son Ramses are in the Sudan searching for Viscount Blacktower's son and his new bride. As trouble follows them everywhere it is not long before they are caught up in a web of deceit and treachery. Once again their survival depends upon Peabody's powers of deduction, Ramses ability to look like one of the natives and Emerson's ability to frighten anybody and everybody who gets in his way.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Jolly Good Murder Mystery, 14 Mar. 2013
By 
Wendy Jones "wjones7423" (Dundee, Scotland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Now you must forgive my choice of words for the title but this book takes you back to the days when the British Upper Crust spoke in such a manner. I love the Amelia Peabody mysteries and this one maintains the usual high standards of the others. This Time Emerson and Amelia are excavating archeological sites in the Sudan and before you know it up to their necks in trouble. Elizabeth Peters has an evocative writing style which means you can picture the exotic scenes perfectly. The characters are described vividly and I could almost picture myself talking to them. Their son Ramses is now 10 and up to his usual mischief. As well as being a murder mystery this book is also laugh out loud funny. Although the books can be read as a stand alone it would be better to read the first book of the series before moving on to the others. This will give you the story of how Amelia and Emerson met and sets the tone for the remainder of the books. If you like historical murder mysteries you will love this series
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Suspenseful Look at a Lost Kingdom, 18 Jun. 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
One of the great traditions of adventure novels has been to take "civilized" people into hidden places where primitive people live a different way. In the process, readers learn a lot about themselves and the ways that "civilization" needs to be improved. Lost Horizons is one of the most famous of such stories. In an earlier time, H. Rider Haggard wrote his remarkable book, She, in this genre which seems to have been a direct inspiration for The Last Camel Died at Noon based on comments by the author in the acknowledgments and the book's story. But if you know "She," you will not necessarily be able to anticipate what happens in this story.
If you have read no other books in this series, I suggest that you move back to the beginning in The Crocodile on the Sandbank and read the four subsequent novels before reading this one. The books build on one another, and deserve sequential reading for the most pleasure and understanding.
Amelia Peabody, her husband Emerson and their son Ramses are among the most distinctive and entertaining characters to ever populate a historical mystery novel, and they are as delightful as possible in playing their assigned roles in The Last Camel Died at Noon.
The Emersons find themselves drawn to the Sudan in an unusual adventure. Progress by British troops has reopened such of the historical sites, and the Emersons race behind the sloppy Budge to record what they find there. While planning the trip, they are importuned to help search for the lost explorer, Willoughby Forth, and his new bride, who have not been seen since they left on a trip into the Sudan fourteen years earlier. While in the Sudan, the Emersons find evidence that perhaps it may be possible to find the Forths. After a relative of the Forths disappears into the desert where he is attacked by raiders, the Emersons resolve to follow. Soon, their last camel dies at noon. What will happen next?
The story is quite intriguing and develops many aspects of archeology that I enjoyed. My only complaint was that the precocious Ramses was a little too precocious in the role that he played in this book. It just didn't ring true in places. The story, however, is a rich and interesting one. I highly recommend it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A jolly romp, 29 Jun. 2014
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Not quite the best Peabody book in my opinion. It had all the expected thrills but lacked some of the humour of some of the other novels. A must read for Amelia fans as it further develops the Emerson family. Will be starting the next one soon.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Hidden Oasis, 25 April 2014
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There is something about the idea of a secret village by a hidden oasis that no Western person has ever found that is compelling. It is stuffed with beautiful things and peaceful people who are in a kind of suspended antiquity in their attitudes and their dress. Amelia is the same character in this extraordinary environment and I can only say that it is another page turner that gives lovely pictures in the mind on every page.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Amelia is beginning to irritate..., 17 April 2014
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I like to find a sizeable series of harmless books that I can dip into without being too taxed, and can read one after the other without waiting for a future publication date, and these fit the bill. This is the sixth in the series, and is much the same in pace and quality as the last five; a decent-ish story, descriptive scenes and old-fashioned (at times) dialogue - nice and harmless. But..... Amelia is seriously beginning to grate on my nerves. She has gone from being a no-nonsense forward thinking person in the first couple of books into a somewhat big headed and bossy harridan - constantly wanting to be proved right, constantly thinking that only she can manage things the right way, constantly going off on her own to prove to us and herself that she doesn't rely on a mere man, and worst of all constantly interrupting and cutting off her poor son, a child any parent would surely be proud to call their own, and who always seems to be on the right track to solve the mystery or to give us, as readers, some clues or insights into the story, but never, ever, ever gets the chance to do so. I find this really repetitive and frustrating, and her increasingly difficult to like. In fact, how her son or husband manage to put up with her is more of a mystery to me than any of the stories!
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The Last Camel Died at Noon (Amelia Peabody Mysteries)
The Last Camel Died at Noon (Amelia Peabody Mysteries) by Elizabeth Peters (Mass Market Paperback - 1 Oct. 1992)
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