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4.0 out of 5 stars Another good Deryni novel!
A fan of the series for over two decades, it's always with great pleasure that I return to the Deryni universe. Now 40+ years in the making, Katherine Kurtz's landmark series seldom fails to satisfy. Sadly, though she is likely the mother of historical fantasy, over the years the NYT bestselling Deryni saga has become out of print and thus a bit harder to find. Which...
Published on 2 May 2011 by Patrick St-Denis

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Better than the first in the trilogy, but still not essential reading
As a huge fan of the earlier Deryni books, I was extremely underwhelmed by the first book in this trilogy and so I started this with some trepidation.

Luckily this book does flow better than the first one did, but it still lacks a main thrust to the plot and so it still comes over as an exercise in filling in the bits of history laid down in the books set in a...
Published on 22 April 2009 by Blackhorse47


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Better than the first in the trilogy, but still not essential reading, 22 April 2009
As a huge fan of the earlier Deryni books, I was extremely underwhelmed by the first book in this trilogy and so I started this with some trepidation.

Luckily this book does flow better than the first one did, but it still lacks a main thrust to the plot and so it still comes over as an exercise in filling in the bits of history laid down in the books set in a later period. The novel again covers a considerable passage of time and tells the story of many different people, but they don't unify into any sort of coherent whole.

Concentrating on the plight of just one of the characters from here and giving them something to achieve would have greatly improved things. Instead we are introduced to someone, they have woe after woe heaped upon them and then just when you think they might fight back, they die, usually in a way that has nothing to do with any foes they may have, or problems they're trying to solve. This may be realistic, as people in these times did die in a multitude of tragic ways, but when main characters keel over and die from consumption in a story, it's curiously flat.

Then, as with the first book, we have to sit around while the news of the death is passed from person to person, letting us see everyone's reactions, which are always the same that it's sad. We get a forlorn funeral. Then the narrative move on to someone else who has heaps of woe dumped on them and just when things get interesting they die in a sad and lonely way...

What stops this getting thoroughly tedious is that the author can still write a good scene and that as she cuts down the characters there are still a few we know must live and that gradually increases the interest. Best of all in the final stages a plot arrives out of nowhere. That plot may be corny with low-grade action and adventure thrust upon the situation, but it reads so much better than everything that comes before it and is a return to the fun style from earlier in the series.

I'll therefore read on when the next book arrives, and I hope it continues in the style of the final section of this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Childe Morgan, 6 Feb 2009
By 
S. Teoh (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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I've read the earlier Deryni novels - Camber, Morgan, Kelson series. And I remember hearing years ago that Katherine Kurtz was writing the Childe Morgan trilogy. So I read In The King's Service and was waiting for this, which I presumed would be more exciting because it would actually feature Morgan. I am somewhat disappointed. The story rushes along with bits thrown in every which way for convenience, to make it fit in with whatever it is that Katherine Kurtz has put in her previous works. There isn't much character development and what I find quite amusing is that a 2yr old Morgan is amazingly advanced for his age. Its a real shame actually, because I like the world she's created and I like the characters and Morgan is one of my favourites. But these later books of hers just feel like something she should have done a long time ago when the whole world was fresh in her mind, but instead has left for a bit too long and kind of lost her way a bit. For the sake of completeness, if you're a Katherine Kurtz fan, get it, it's not that bad. But if you've never read Katherine Kurtz before, go for her earlier work because this is not going to convince you to keep reading her.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A real disappointment, 14 Aug 2009
By 
Stephen C. Grantham (UK) - See all my reviews
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Much as I like the Deryni novels this is, without doubt, the weakest one I have read yet. Indeed, it's the only weak one which makes it even more of a disappointment.

All it does is fill in a bit of back story and say why some characters died. It borders on the mawkish in places and certainly does not show much of the character of Alaric Morgan or his development.

For completists only.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 20 Feb 2008
By 
Robert Horton - See all my reviews
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I love the early Deryni novels, and would recommend them to all fantasy readers as well worth the time to seek out and enjoy. Unfortunately I have found the last couple of offerings to be far below the high standards of their predecessors.

For me, Childe Morgan lacked excitement - there was very little action and virtually no exploration of the Deryni magic that has been the theme of so many of Katherine Kurtz's novels. Rather than an engaging tale of magical fantasy, the novel seemed more like an academic exercise in showing a detailed account of how life was lived in the middle ages. Though I am sure that the detail was historically accurate, the story suffered as a result. Aside from filling in some of the gaps left between previous novels, I do not believe that this one was really worth the read.

I can only hope that future Deryni novels return to the heights of the earlier works.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 6 Sep 2013
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I think this is one of the latest published books in Katherine Kurtz's Deryni fantasy series, but I was disappointed. Okay it does tie up some loose ends of the history, but it was nothing like as gripping a read as her other books.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Another good Deryni novel!, 2 May 2011
By 
Patrick St-Denis "editor of Pat's Fantasy Hot... (Laval, Quebec Canada) - See all my reviews
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A fan of the series for over two decades, it's always with great pleasure that I return to the Deryni universe. Now 40+ years in the making, Katherine Kurtz's landmark series seldom fails to satisfy. Sadly, though she is likely the mother of historical fantasy, over the years the NYT bestselling Deryni saga has become out of print and thus a bit harder to find. Which means that an entire generation of SFF readers have yet to get acquainted with this classic sequence of books.

Moreover, other than the the very first trilogy (which, truth to tell, is perhaps the weakest in the saga) being reissued recently, what Deryni novels still in print (King Kelson's Bride, In the King's Service, and Childe Morgan) are more or less meant to bridge various gaps in the saga's timeline instead of focusing on new storylines that could perhaps entice new readers to plunge into the Deryni universe and fall in love with it and the great characters that populate its history.

Having said that, as a direct sequel to In the King's Service, Childe Morgan is sure to please Katherine Kurtz's fans awaiting new Deryni adventures. The events chronicled in this novel span a period of approximately two and a half years, covering Alaric Morgan's early childhood and what will lead to Kurtz's first trilogy.

As a prequel to The Deryni Chronicles series, like its predecessor Childe Morgan covers a lot of ground, paving the way to the book which started it all, Deryni Rising, about twenty-five years in the future. Familiar themes such as Mearan rebels, the Camberian Council's machinations, Torenthi incursions into Gwynedd, the Church's hatred toward Deryni, the separation between Church and State, and a monarch desperately attempting to protect his lineage feature quite prominently in this novel.

Kurtz's historian eye for details makes for beautiful and vivid worldbuilding. The richness of details and her depiction of medieval life creates an imagery which brings the world and its protagonists to life.

And yet, although Katherine Kurtz's worldbuilding skills are on par with gifted fantasy authors such as Steven Erikson, George R. R. Martin, Robert Jordan, and R. Scott Bakker, it's the characterization which elevates her books over that of the competition and makes the Deryni Saga one of my most beloved series of all time. Not unlike Robin Hobb and Guy Gavriel Kay, Kurtz's subtle human touch can pull on those heartstrings when you least expect it. Damn her, but Kurtz managed to make my eyes water again! Few writers have the ability to create such genuine characters that you come to care about the way Katherine Kurtz can, seemingly effortlessly.

As was the case in In the King's Service, Lady Alyce de Corwyn takes center stage. Sir Kenneth Morgan, as Alaric's father, and King Donal Blaine Haldane, understandably, also have important roles to play. I have to admit that it was quite amusing to see Duncan McLain and Alaric Morgan, two of the most important power players in the struggle to come, as mischievous children playing in the mud!

Amid all the politicking, there are a number of poignant moments in Childe Morgan, especially in every scene featuring Sir Sé Trelawney, childhood friend of Lady Alyce and now a fully avowed Knight of the Anvil. Somehow, this character manages to steal the show every time he's present, even though it's done in a very subtle manner.

The pace is fluid throughout, the narrative fleshes out details we've been waiting for years to see unveiled. All too quickly, the end comes, with no other Deryni installment in sight for the near future.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Childe Morgan - what a waste, 23 Jun 2009
Most awful book written - not just is there almost no plot, no live, no character, it also raises more questions than it answers. In repsonse I had to re-read some of the earlier books, just to remind myself how truly wonderful the author can be.

My advice - give this one a miss.
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4.0 out of 5 stars childe morgan, 6 Jun 2009
Have bought all Katherine Kurtz Deryni books from Amazon and there is'nt one I would'nt reccommend .
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Self-indulgent and boring, 15 July 2009
By 
N. Williamson (Shrewsbury, Shropshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This book is about nothing more than KK indulging her fascination with 10th century Europe by showing off how much historical accuracy she can shoe-horn into the narrative. I get the distinct impression that this book was written to satisfy an American readership who would possibly be fascinated by so much period detail, but, as someone who had to endure endless history lessons about the excruciatingly boring history of Britain, Wales, Scotland and France in the Middle Ages, I have to say that I am not impressed at having it re-hashed back at me disguised as escapism. If I had wanted a treatise on mediaeval politics I would have bought one, but I bought this twaddle instead, and spent 3 hours desperately trying to find something interesting in it. Come on, KK, you can do better than this, where's all the magic, glamour, intrigue, spell-casting and swashbuckling from the earlier novels? There's very little mileage in being so punctilious about minor historical accuracies, because, after all, it's an imaginary landscape, so why didn't you let your imagination run free instead of bogging down in tedium - after all, that's what first attracted me to your books all those years ago? I was hoping for a little magic here, what I got was large helpings of lumpen, uninteresting droning. Could do better, 3/10
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Childe Morgan (Deryni)
Childe Morgan (Deryni) by Katherine Kurtz (Hardcover - 5 Dec 2006)
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