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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best John Grisham Book Written To Date
Having read all the John Grisham novels published to date, I bought The Brethren on a Saturday afternoon, when I got home I started to read it and couldn't put it down until I had finished early on Sunday morning. Two seperate stories that intertwine and come together, to create a story that holds you captivated until the final page. All his books are good but I think...
Published on 1 Feb 2001

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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Decent Holiday Read
This isn't Grisham writing with passion; he's filling his time before embarking on another, better, idea, it seems. Having said that though, the premise of the story is an interesting one and, while the tale gets lost as the author indulges himself in his knowledge of Presidential primaries (and judging from the 2004 race Grisham does know of what he speaks), there are...
Published on 17 Feb 2004


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best John Grisham Book Written To Date, 1 Feb 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Brethren (Paperback)
Having read all the John Grisham novels published to date, I bought The Brethren on a Saturday afternoon, when I got home I started to read it and couldn't put it down until I had finished early on Sunday morning. Two seperate stories that intertwine and come together, to create a story that holds you captivated until the final page. All his books are good but I think this is his best yet, I highly recommend it, if you like legal and political thriller you will not be disappointed.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Brethren � A Review, 27 Sep 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: The Brethren (Mass Market Paperback)
This isn't the first Grisham novel I've read so I think it's safe to say that this is book somewhat unlike his others. Here, Grisham provides a real page turner that keeps the suspense going until the very last page. The characters in the novel are entirely believable from a bumbling and incompetent lawyer to the trio of clapped-out judges who share centre stage in the story (at times, caricatures of themselves). As usual Grisham takes time in developing the characters and presents each of them in a distinctly coherent way.
I'd truly hate to give the game away but, in short, with a subtle twist near the end of the story you'd be a fool to miss it!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great writing, interesting premise, 4 Feb 2011
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This review is from: The Brethren (Paperback)
I first read this novel when it was published in 2000. It was the first novel by Grisham that I ever read, and it set me on a two-month-long Grisham-marathon. There are basically two main storylines that run concurrently: that of the Brethren at Trumble, and Aaron Lake's presidential primary campaign. It's not stated how they connect, but one quickly figures it out (otherwise, there would clearly be no point in having them both in the same novel).

It's pre-9/11, and the Cold War is still on people's minds, not to mention the fear of a renewed war - cold or otherwise - with a frustrated Russia. This is the nightmare scenario CIA chief Teddy Maynard is trying to push into the American consciousness. Maynard wants a pliable president, one with the CIA and defence department's interests at heart. Aaron Lake is the perfect candidate - squeaky clean, respected but not flashy, and a work horse on Congressional defence committees. The political side of this novel could be characterised as the military-industrial-complex meets Wag the Dog - a distillation of everything conspiracy theorists (and, increasingly, more-sane citizens) worry about the American democratic process - that is, secret moneyed interests in the defence industry buying the election for a candidate who sells his soul for cash and political fame. Only, it's also as if the conspiracies about the military-industrial-complex are not only real, but they're not big enough - the CIA is trying to pick a president, and they'll engineer international events to prove him a foreign policy visionary, and in the end scare the American public into voting for him, in return getting their increased defence budgets and an eternal state of readiness.

Maynard is wonderfully Machiavellian. He embodies much of the contents and suggestions in The Prince, yet Grisham manages to keep him from becoming a cartoon. Lake comes across as the genuinely well-intentioned candidate who quickly becomes enamoured with the status and trappings of a political rising-star. The money is pouring into his campaign coffers in amounts as-yet unheard of (although, reading it now, the numbers are quite small compared to the 2008 election figures), and Lake is making the most of the political machine Maynard and company assemble for him. Everything is planned out - the ups and downs of Lake's campaign, even the forthcoming general election. Everything will goes as planned. As long as there are no surprises, of course...

Meanwhile, the three judges at Trumble are working away at their mail scam, hoping to spend their remaining years of incarceration blackmailing older homosexuals still in the closet. Their scam is certainly cruel, and highlights the continued stigma attached to homosexuality in the US - even though things may have moved forward a little over the past decade, much of the sentiment described in the novel is the same as what one might hear coming out of Sarah Palin's mouth. (Well, actually, what's in "The Brethren" is far more tame than that.) When Grisham turns our attention to the judges' victims, he deals with them in a very sympathetic way, as they struggle with the fear of their secrets being revealed.

The judges are angry at the world, and the idea for scam came from another prison and another time, when it was successfully carried out for years. There are times when the judges' inherent concern for others does come through - particularly in the case of Buster, an extremely young prisoner sentenced to 48 years for a crime he not only didn't commit, but had no way of committing. There is some balance between the judges - who have all the time in the world to scheme, and are surprisingly similar characters given their broad geographic origins - and their drunk attorney, who acts as their outside courier and money-man, a quite damaged character whose legal career has far from taken off.

Some things don't change. In his announcement speech, Lake "became wonderfully angry at the Chinese", and also "blistered the Chinese for their looting [of nuclear secrets] and their unprecedented military buildup. The strategy was Teddy's. Use the Chinese to scare the American voters", just as candidates on both sides of the aisle are doing today during the 2010 midterms. True, in the novel's case, it's to distract from the activities of rogue Russian elements. Today, on the other hand, it's to distract from US domestic problems.

The all-powerful forces of money behind politics are, as mentioned, a significant feature of the novel. Considering the recent Supreme Court ruling that officially opened up elections to seemingly endless amounts of corporate money, "The Brethren" was in many ways a prescient novel. The ability for corporations and special interests to buy elements of elections is frightening, and Grisham fully evokes the ease with which money can swing the course of American elections, and therefore politics as a whole.

I often forget how much social and political commentary Grisham can seamlessly cram into a novel (in just one chapter, for example, we get indictment of politics and the sorry state of daytime TV, for example). When I first read this, I missed a lot of the political commentary, not having had much exposure to US politics at the time (although, it was only a year before my professional interest in/obsession with it began). Second time around, and I know I got more out of this than before.

Despite my disappointment with "The Associate", which I felt was based on a sloppy, shaky premise (and a little too transparent an attempt to recreate the feel of "The Firm"), Grisham remains one of the best authors writing today. Some may sneer, because he's not producing "literature", but his novels are original, intelligent, and exceptionally well-written and plotted thrillers.

All of Grisham's characters are well-drawn and realistic - whether prominent in his novels or peripheral. The dialogue is natural, and the author's prose flow perfectly. It was extremely difficult to put this novel down. Can one ask for anything more from a thriller? With a satisfying ending, The Brethren remains, for me, one of Grisham's finest novels.

Highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I liked very much this book. But, controversy galore!, 7 July 2000
This review is from: The Brethren (Hardcover)
I confess that after the fiasco of "The Testament" and the semi-fiasco of "The Street Lawyer" I started to read "The Brethem" (Translated in Spanish as: "La Hermandad") somewhat worried. Many of the comments recorded in Amazon (this page) were not helping very much.
This initial reluctance turned soon into a deep interest in the history. The once intimidating 500 pages hardback novel became a page-turning affair. After ending the book, I started to wonder how John Grisham may invent these amazing, terrific histories. I think it's a very good modern novel in the track of "The Firm" or "The Pelican brief"; very appealing, although not perfect.
Considering again the large amount opinions about this book listed in Amazon (see below), I think readers could be divided into two broad families: people loving this book or people almost hating it. I am very involved on elucidate the reasons of such big differences in opinion about last Grisham book.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Decent Holiday Read, 17 Feb 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: The Brethren (Paperback)
This isn't Grisham writing with passion; he's filling his time before embarking on another, better, idea, it seems. Having said that though, the premise of the story is an interesting one and, while the tale gets lost as the author indulges himself in his knowledge of Presidential primaries (and judging from the 2004 race Grisham does know of what he speaks), there are just enough confrontations and discoveries to keep a Grisham fan turning the pages until the - disappointing - end.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars And suddenly, without warning: nothing happened!, 25 Jun 2007
By 
Mr. R. D. Turner (Derby, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Brethren (Paperback)
A very easy to read novel where absolutely nothing happens form beginning to end. No twists, no main character. No sense. Two stars only for the writing which is as transparent as JG books always are but very very poor.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not bad, but more of the same, 12 Jun 2006
This review is from: The Brethren (Paperback)
The pace is good, the characters are not bad (though he has done better) but it just felt that I've "been there - done that" before with this book - Either John Grisham is getting a bit repetitive in his storytelling or I'm getting a bit bored of reading them!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Different Grisham, 15 Jan 2001
By 
R. G. Mabbitt (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Brethren (Paperback)
I have read and really enjoyed every other Grisham book (4 or 5 stars every one), but this was a disappointment. Maybe it is unfair to expect him to keep churning out the same fast-paced, page-turning stuff, but that is what I want when I pick up one of his books. If I want more thought-provoking reading matter I look at other authors. Also I feel his chracters are much weaker than usual. I found it difficult to build up any empathy with any of them. Added to these points, American presidential politics is so boring, and not a good base for an enjoyable read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Does Grisham need a long holiday?, 3 April 2000
This review is from: The Brethren (Hardcover)
The header of this page stated that it is hard to believe that it is just John Grisham toiling away and producing these novels at speed. Personally, I would rather be patient and have a quality novel every few years. The Brethren basically limps from page to page with the dull tale of three judges running a scam in prison and of a golden boy plucked to become President so long as he toes the line of the shadowed manipulators, who will create war to get him there. Grisham's books always provide a character you are rooting for and who welcomes you back each time you pick it up. This book lacks the character and also the convinction to at least finish with sparkle. The end is a real disappointment. I only hope Grisham just needs a holiday to revitalise his creative brain-cells.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clever use of the American political and criminal worlds., 15 Feb 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Brethren (Hardcover)
Grisham is back to his 'suspense' style of writing. From the very 1st page you are captured as he superbly introduces the main characters. Small sub-plots intertwine with a balance that keeps you wanting to 'turn the next page' in anticipation.
The 3 judges that make up the Brethren, lead by Joe Roy Spicer, are a delight to read about. Far from being criminals they become 3 infamous heroes with their clever '1-step-ahead' routine that keeps the CIA on their toes.
Aaron Lake is supposedly a mild-mannered 'never done anything wrong' would-be president - but then again isn't that like real life today?
Grisham's in-depth knowledge of the legal, and probably, illegal world coupled with his sense and perception of the 'behind the walls' everyday activity both in Government and Prison environments makes this book truly compelling.
Grisham is back to his best....keep going John. I love it!
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The Brethren
The Brethren by John Grisham (Mass Market Paperback - 31 Jan 2001)
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