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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved this book!
I loved this book! Granted, Falcon is full of testosterone and he is domineering, and even a creep, but I like them that way. I don't want a sappy, wimpy hero. I like them to take charge and be demanding. It makes for such a worthwhile romance. What fun is it for them to say "I love you and fall onto the bed in the first chapter. I like fierce resistance on the...
Published on 18 Sept. 1998

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Well-written but Jasmine needs shooting!
Another fantastic storyline from Henley who has the ability to weave her reader into her reality. The dampeners were put on however, by the heroine Jasmine, who quite frankly was irritating. While Henley fans relish a good chase, witty repartee, and the eventual emmergence of the already present but well-hidden love, they might be disappointed that Jasmine doesn't thaw...
Published on 9 Oct. 2000


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Well-written but Jasmine needs shooting!, 9 Oct. 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Falcon and the Flower (Mass Market Paperback)
Another fantastic storyline from Henley who has the ability to weave her reader into her reality. The dampeners were put on however, by the heroine Jasmine, who quite frankly was irritating. While Henley fans relish a good chase, witty repartee, and the eventual emmergence of the already present but well-hidden love, they might be disappointed that Jasmine doesn't thaw until the end, after Falcon has forced her a few times. This puts you off the great oaf, and makes you think Jasmine too frosty to like. Otherwise, well-written.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved this book!, 18 Sept. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Falcon and the Flower (Mass Market Paperback)
I loved this book! Granted, Falcon is full of testosterone and he is domineering, and even a creep, but I like them that way. I don't want a sappy, wimpy hero. I like them to take charge and be demanding. It makes for such a worthwhile romance. What fun is it for them to say "I love you and fall onto the bed in the first chapter. I like fierce resistance on the woman's part and "I'm going to take you anyway types on the man's part. That kind of book makes me squirm and I like it!!! Virginia Henley does not dissapoint.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Think carefully what you like before you read, 11 Jun. 2008
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This review is from: The Falcon and the Flower (Mass Market Paperback)
This tale is based during the rein of King John I who features prominently in the novel once he becomes king. The story is about an innocent, naive angelic maiden Jasmine of Salisbury, the illegitimate daughter of the half brother of King John who captures the attention of the most powerful, rich virile knight Falcon de Burge. From that point on Falcon wants Jasmine but Jasmine does not want Falcon.

The historical details of that period, events and locations is fascinating be it fact or fiction, its well written and I relished reading every word of it.

The story of the maid and knight is however the worst i have read to-date of the medieval times. The hero and heroine were ridiculously silly. More so the heroine Jasmine.

Jasmine appeared to have a split personality.... in fact it was a 3 way split. She started of as an innocent, frightened young girl who didn't know the ways of the world and I found that quite endearing. However once Falcon declared he wanted to marry her she turned into an obstinate, angry, wilful, petulant, irritating girl and all within a split second as if someone had clicked their fingers, refusing to do whatever she was told (or even asked) by Falcon. She got into various scrapes but never acknowledged or appreciated anything Falcon did to rescue her or protect her for own safety. And lastly as if by miracle, having consistently refused his attentions she suddenly became this willing seductive sensual person who couldn't keep her hands off of him or his off of her, again as if though someone had clicked their fingers. Yet Henley expected us to believe that she was the most delightful angelic wife and chataleine, loved by all De Burgh's people and knights at his lands and castles... if i was one of his people, i would have put her down as a silly spoilt young child. It was as if the author could not allow her heroine to grow and change gradually, to reveal her secret hidden depths as time passed and events within her life changed her.. no everything had to happen to Jasmine instanteously. The only time Jasmine came into her own was towards the end of the book. If I could split the book into fifths than it was the last fifth of the book Jasmine blossomed into a woman and her acts became selfless as she matured. That was the only time I admired her.

Now for Falcon. OK some reviewers have said he forced and raped her constantly...but that was what happened in that era...its the medieval times period after all.. get over it. That's what they did then and in any case he only actually forced her after they married and even then it was done for her own protection. Would she rather have been violently forced and lost her virtue to King John rather than a man who actually loved her? and love her he did, virile warriors don't easily admit to it, which man does unless they have to. In those days men took what was rigthfully theirs by bethrotal or marriage. Some of us like to read about dominant men, those who don't should not read this book. Therefore other than the fact that Falcon allowed the selfish, obstinate, spoilt Jasmine to wrap him round her little finger and he acquiesed to her demands more often than not which emasculated him in my eyes I did not have any major issues with his character. I didn't much like the gore of the killings and he seemed to do a lot of those or the fact that he actually hit Jasmine more than once...but again that was in retaliation to her stupid antiques...and I guess the man was master in his house so it was to be expected and tolerated in those times...even if it seems abhorent to us now.

In conclusion its a shame henley besmirched a good historical tale by introducing a character like Jasmine and for me if you like to read about dominant masculine forceful male characters than you will like Falcon or if you like to read about innocent but strong of female characters (about a woman rather than a child) with a bit more substance to them than you won't like Jasmine.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars ENOUGH ALREADY!!!!!, 19 May 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Falcon and the Flower (Mass Market Paperback)
When I first saw this book, it sounded cool, so I bought it. The beginning was good, I enjoyed the meeting between Jasmine and Falcon. The adventure sequence was fine, but the characters ruined it for me. The guy is walking, talking tube of testosterone and the girl is obviously going through an identity crisis . She thinks she's a porcupine. The love-hate thing was good for a while, but come on. But the miiddle of the book, it really got boring. Falcon does nothing but lust after Jasmine and she does nothing but say "No" throughout the whole book. Can't they at least get a little close? An entire conversation with flying into the roof would be nice. If you want to use the love-hate thing, it's fine; just don't overdo it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not Romantic at all, 18 Oct. 2010
This review is from: The Falcon and the Flower (Mass Market Paperback)
I read this book after finding the book by chance at the library. The blurb on the back of the book makes the story seem enjoyable and light hearted, so I decided to read it. The story centres around 19 year old Jasmine, a fairy princess like beauty living with her grandmother Estelle. Her mother died in childbirth and her father lives elsewhere with his legitimate children. Her father agrees for his friend, Falcon de Burgh, to wed one of his daughters. He wants Jasmine, despite her being illegitimate. Jasmine wants to marry no-one, but Falcon is determined to have her, whether she likes it or not. The betrothal is arranged, but this doesn't stop him from chasing other women behind Jasmine's back. Over time, he increases pressure on Jasmine to sleep with him before they marry and she refuses each time. This does not deter him, and he is adament she will bend to his will. When King John is paid for another to marry her, Falcon forces himself on Jasmine, practically raping her after forcing a priest to marry them. Falcon forces himself on her alot, and when she opens her mouth too much, he disciplines her. This is not the romantic story I envisaged. In other historical romance novels, if the male is angered by the female, he distances himself from her and doesn't hurt her. Falcon has a strange way of showing love, even bedding an ex lover during his marriage.

This is the first and last book I will read by Virginia Henley. It's a pity as the blurb makes it sound more interesting than what it really was. I am glad I didn't buy it, that is for sure.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exquisite Story of Love and Honesty, 9 Sept. 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: The Falcon and the Flower (Mass Market Paperback)
This book is my personal favorite from Virginia Henley. The mysticism of white witchcraft and the courageous plights of Falcon de Burgh and Jasmine of Salisbury are enthralling. Henley manages to even add the legendary Robin Hood to the story for quite a fighting scene. She shows in her story how King's of the time, particularly King John, misused their powers for their own pleasure, making the people suffer. "The Falcon and the Flower" also reminds readers of the importance of honesty and communication in one's relationships, which was the conflict between Falcon and Jasmine.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars What a bastard!, 3 Aug. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Falcon and the Flower (Mass Market Paperback)
How more annoying could these two characters be? Although Falcon's decision that he wants Jasmine instead of her wealthier half-sisters is all well and sweet, the physical abuse etc which he puts her through is untenable. Having a domineering hero is fine, and I suspect most readers (including myself) prefer them that way. However, there should be a limit. The fact that he keeps having sex with Jasmine against her will (and it's not just a case of her saying "no" and then being seduced anyway) is enough to put anyone off this book. For all that, if you've nothing better to read, this will do for a light read.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Historical and romantic, 19 April 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Falcon and the Flower (Mass Market Paperback)
I love Virginia Henley's love for history, as I do. Her research for her novels in itself is enough to keep me reading to find out more about the outcome of the particular historical event she's penning. Her heroes are extraordinary. Especially the 'Falcon'. He was man enough to put up with Jasmine's undecidedness, and sometimes just downright childish behavior. He was patient, which in itself made him an extraordinary man. But once Jasmine fell in love, she was his most loyal supporter. She sacrificed herself for her family. Again, 'she did what a woman had to do'. One reader commenting the novels said the history was 'mumbo jumbo', but it is a fact that Virignia Henley is a REAL historical writer, in the true essence!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!, 13 Mar. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Falcon and the Flower (Mass Market Paperback)
I thought this book was quite good. Although it contained a lot of mumbo jumbo about the wars and all, I still enjoyed the love-hate thing between Falcon and Jasmine.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars abusive hero and flaky heroine, what fun!, 6 Jun. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Falcon and the Flower (Mass Market Paperback)
I usually like Henley, but I could barely finish this book. Not only does the hero rape the heroine repeatedly, but he is also physically abusive. He seems to be interested only in her body, and feels little or no guilt about his behavior. I will now think twice before buying any of Henley's older stuff and so should you!
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The Falcon and the Flower
The Falcon and the Flower by Virginia Henley (Mass Market Paperback - 1 Jan. 1996)
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