Customer Reviews


13 Reviews
5 star:
 (7)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THEY CAME FROM OUTER SPACE....
This is a wonderfully inventive story that has spawned three films. Well written sci-fi, the book tells the tale of a small town through the eyes of its young doctor, Miles Bennell. It seems the town is undergoing a drastic change which is as subtle as it is deadly. It seems that all the townspeople are not what they seem. They look the same. They sound the same. Their...
Published on 1 Nov 2003 by Lawyeraau

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars please read the front part of this c.d collection carefully......
first of all, i am not reviewing this novel in book form, i am reviewing the audio c.d collection. secondly, this has no bearing on the novel itself as i consider "invasion of the body snatchers" to be an undisputed masterpiece of science fiction and of modern literature.
the point is, this c.d collection clearly states on the front cover that this recording is...
Published on 3 Sep 2010 by jeremiah harbottle


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THEY CAME FROM OUTER SPACE...., 1 Nov 2003
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This is a wonderfully inventive story that has spawned three films. Well written sci-fi, the book tells the tale of a small town through the eyes of its young doctor, Miles Bennell. It seems the town is undergoing a drastic change which is as subtle as it is deadly. It seems that all the townspeople are not what they seem. They look the same. They sound the same. Their memories are intact. Still, they are just not the same.
Those who have noticed this, suddenly end up retracting their concerns days later. Something is not right in the town of Mills Valley, and Dr, Bennell knows it. Those large seed pods that are suddenly showing up every where are at the root of it. Their unearthly presence is connected to the profound changes that the people of Mills Valley are undergoing, and Dr. Bennell will stop at nothing to save his beloved town and the world from the invasion of the body snatchers.
This is a great story by a wonderfully inventive writer. Jack Finney is a masterful story teller. He expertly weaves a tale that will keep the reader riveted to the pages of this book. It is no wonder that three films based upon this book have been made, "The Invasion of the Body Snatchers" (1956), The Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978), and Body Snatchers (1994). All three are worth watching.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Classic SF, 25 July 2002
It was years ago that I read this book, but it deserves a review nevertheless. I don't recall The Body Snatchers having the same metaphorical underpinnings as the films (the '56 one supposedly being a communist allegory, the '78 film about urban isolation & dehumanisation) but Finney tackles his legendary plot with what can only be described as gusto. All the intricacies of the subject are explored: is it just a paranoid fantasy? how far could the conspiracy have spread? how much danger are we really in? and, of course, the philosophical problem raised by the pod-people themselves - wouldn't mankind be better off if we just gave into them? - making this quite a thoughtful novel, really.
What makes it entertaining though is Finney's ability to express various levels of creeping fear & paranoia, momentary relief and even excitement - Finney's written account of THAT classic scene in the films, the denoument I mean, is as exhilirating as any motion picture.
All in all, good solid science fiction full of thought and thrills, and I am surprised that it is not held in higher esteem. Not a forgotten classic (hence the four stars) but a book worth any SF fan's time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Watch the skies! Watch the skies!, 19 Jan 2006
Dr Miles Bennell is a doctor in this future America of 1976, although has Finney hasn’t really envisaged any social changes looking ahead from his 1954 viewpoint we might just as well consider it the Nineteen Fifties.
Miles works in Mill Valley, California, a typical American small town where, unaccountably, his patients are beginning to suffer from a common delusion; namely that their closest relatives are not their closest relatives, that they are, in fact, impostors.
Miles is ready to write this off as a case of mass-hysteria, until he is called out by his friend Jack Belicec who has discovered a body in his cellar, a body which could be Jack but which lacks the fine detail in the skin of wrinkles and fingerprints.
It transpires that alien seedpods have drifted to Earth and their survival mechanism is to copy living tissue, destroying the original in the process.
By the time Miles and his girlfriend Becky discover the truth, most of the town has been taken over, and it is here that the novel cranks up the suspense, where Miles and Becky are trapped in his surgery, watching the emotionless copies of locals rounding up the uninfected.
Although relatively unknown as a novel it has spawned three major motion pictures. The first, in black and white, is set in a contemporary Fifties US. the second updates the story to a US of the 1980s and thereby, to my mind, loses the essence of the novel which is so rooted in the paranoia of the Fifties that, along with The Puppet Masters, it is a benchmark of the American consciousness of the time. Again, as in Heinlein’s novel, we see the fearful concept of members of one’s own family actually being ‘something else’ thinking different thoughts and adopting different social values.
The films also (perhaps wisely) lose Finney’s upbeat ending in which the Earth is freed, substituting it for an ambiguous nihilistic finale in which the hero is left alone, trying to stay awake and alert the authorities before he is taken over.
Despite its brevity it’s a powerful exercise in suspense, building the pressure from chapter to chapter.
The creatures’ description of their mindless drive to survival is sublime for its time and gives the reader much food for thought on questions of intelligence vs. other survival traits.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars CLONING COURTESY OF OUTER SPACE..., 7 Sep 2003
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Invasion of the Body Snatchers (Mass Market Paperback)
This is a wonderfully inventive story that has spawned three films. Written in clear, spare prose, the book tells the tale of a small town through the eyes of its young doctor, Miles Bennell. It seems the town is undergoing a drastic change which is as subtle as it is deadly. It seems that all the townspeople are not what they seem. They look the same. They sound the same. Their memories are intact. Still, they are just not the same.
Those who have noticed this, suddenly end up retracting their concerns days later. Something is not right in the town of Mills Valley, and Dr, Bennell knows it. Those large seed pods that are suddenly showing up every where are at the root of it. Their unearthly presence is connected to the profound changes that the people of Mills Valley are undergoing, and Dr. Bennell will stop at nothing to save his beloved town and the world from the invasion of the body snatchers.
This is a great story by a wonderfully inventive writer. Jack Finney is a masterful story teller. He expertly weaves a tale that will keep the reader riveted to the pages of this book. It is no wonder that three films based upon this book have been made, "The Invasion of the Body Snatchers" (1956), The Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978), and Body Snatchers (1994). All three are worth watching.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This a book where aliens invade Earth., 8 Jun 1999
By A Customer
This thrilling sci-fi book is full of suspense. The entire plot is eerie and once you pick it up, you won't want to put it down. There are pods and blanks and things that will boggle your mind. This book may even give you nightmares. You should really read this book. It's a page turner and great summer reading.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars please read the front part of this c.d collection carefully......, 3 Sep 2010
By 
jeremiah harbottle (Littlebourne, Kent.) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
first of all, i am not reviewing this novel in book form, i am reviewing the audio c.d collection. secondly, this has no bearing on the novel itself as i consider "invasion of the body snatchers" to be an undisputed masterpiece of science fiction and of modern literature.
the point is, this c.d collection clearly states on the front cover that this recording is unabridged: this is simply incorrect and misleading. on c.d number 3 on track 11 or 12, some of the text from the novel was removed completely and replaced with several words that bear no relation to the novel at all, i have taken the trouble to verify this. i felt and still feel disappointed and also rather cheated and short-changed by this development.
please be aware of the above.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Horror needs no blood, no demons-just FEAR, 2 Jun 1999
By A Customer
An epidemic of a specific neurosis: all around you, people are claiming that their closest friends and relatives have been replaced by perfect impostors. They question their sanity. Then they recover. But you start to wonder, for a friend/family member seems a bit odd to you now... not like himself. You try to get help, but the roads out of the city are inexplicably worsening and your phone won't call out of the area. And then it hits you: THEY HAVE CONTROL...
This story has been retold many times (the 50's serial, book, and movie; the retellings of both in the 70's; and that God-awful 1992 movie). The pure HORROR of its concept is so universal that the term "body snatcher" is used worldwide. Beware the pods: there are places in YOUR house they might hide.
This novel is one of the best I've read. It combines decent (though sometimes stereotypical) characters with unbelievably tense action and story twists (not plot twists, though you might not be able to predict this one). The characters are believably human and the important loose ends are explained; Mr. Finney himself tells you that not all of them will be, which makes for an even better story.
If you haven't seen the 1978 movie with Donald Sutherland:
1. You MUST see it. Don't drink much beforehand.
2. Don't expect the same story as the book; in fact, they're two opposed tellings of a wonderful horror concept.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chilling - slightly disappointing ending, 3 Mar 2009
By 
John Hopper (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
A marvellously haunting and really chilling story, this will be familiar to most through one or other of the film adaptations. The original book and film came out in the 1950s; the book is actually set in 1976, although the feel of the story does hark back to the decade in which was written. There is more background explanation of the pods' origins and the process of transmutation here. The only slight disappointment is the ending, which is abrupt and much more upbeat than the frightening end of the 1956 film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars DOUBLE TROUBLE..., 20 Jan 2005
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This is a wonderfully inventive story that has spawned three films. Well-written, the book tells the tale of a small town through the eyes of its young doctor, Miles Bennell. It seems the town is undergoing a drastic change which is as subtle as it is deadly. It seems that all the townspeople are not what they seem. They look the same. They sound the same. Their memories are intact. Still, they are just not the same.
Those who have noticed this, suddenly end up retracting their concerns days later. Something is not right in the town of Mills Valley, and Dr, Bennell knows it. Those large seed pods that are suddenly showing up every where are at the root of it. Their unearthly presence is connected to the profound changes that the people of Mills Valley are undergoing, and Dr. Bennell will stop at nothing to save his beloved town and the world from the invasion of the body snatchers.
This is a great story by a wonderfully inventive writer. Jack Finney is a masterful story teller. He expertly weaves a tale that will keep the reader riveted to the pages of this book. It is no wonder that three films based upon this book have been made, "The Invasion of the Body Snatchers" (1956), The Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978), and Body Snatchers (1994). All three are worth watching.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nessun Dorma, 8 Oct 2010
By 
Amazon Customer "Boo62" (Ilkeston Derbyshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This was written when sci-fi was basking in the light of it's golden age. While post war America took consumerism and the desire to conform to new heights & communism was the next big threat the sci-fi writers were lifting the rock of society and reporting what they saw, albeit in allegorical tales, but their gaze was both piercing & unflinching.
Jack Finney was in no way the greatest artist amongst them nor was he as inventive as many of his contemporaries but with his classic 'invasion of the body snatchers' he wrote not merely of the political situation of his day, (the mid 1950's), but about those deeply embedded fears and nightmares that haunt us all. Invasion, isolation, transformation & change and above all else death.
The simple premise is of a small town doctor who notices things are not quite as they should be and has his suspicions confirmed by a series of odd complaints by patients and friends. Before long the reason for his unease is revealed and he and his friends are pulled into a nightmarish world of changelings and alien invasion.
The writing see's our hero as the all American hero, square of jaw and irresistible to the ladies. At least that's how it seems at first but as things begin to spiral out of control so Miles loses both confidence and ability to act as his long held beliefs are stripped away from him. His failure in marriage, his trust in science and the notion that just beneath the surface of every red blooded American male there's a hero just waiting for an opportunity to burst forth and perform the impossible.
With these foundations removed he ends up needing to, shock & horror, rely upon a woman to support him in his efforts to survive. Maybe no big deal today but nearly 60 years ago this would have been pretty revolutionary stuff. So too the apparently 'convenient' ending hints even more strongly at how little control men have over the environment around them. A laughable notion for a society that pioneered the disposable, energy greedy & natural resource guzzling product but hindsight is 20:20 and just how much of a miracle would be needed to reverse the inevitable makes Finney's ending seem almost plausible.
The story is not without it's problems. Miles Bennell may have been more equality minded than most of his peers but he's still a bit of a smug git. So too his gal Becky is a simpering bimbo to start with but she eventually rises to the occasion.
Finney also rambles somewhat in places and clearly loves his own theories many of which were a bit crackpot, (look out for his theory on the weight of sunlight on a field), and he has a tendency to repeat certain words and phrases a little too often.
But these are minor quibbles in comparison to a great story that belts along, some excellent yet simple ideas, (you can't fall asleep or 'it'll get you'), and most of all a timeless message that just seems to adapt itself to every generation.
Testimony to this are the 3 films that have been made over several decades but that are still all so gripping and diverse. All 3 are well worth watching and while all of their age they stay true to the books tension and rapid story arc.
You don't have to be a sci-fi fan to enjoy this. It's a classic that remains both entertaining and relevant long after it was originally published.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Invasion of the Body Snatchers
Invasion of the Body Snatchers by Jack Finney (Mass Market Paperback - Nov 1978)
Used & New from: £0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews