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5.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too
TANGERINE is a surreal novel strong in pacing and character development. From the opening page to the very end, Edward Bloor takes the reader on a breakneck course through one family's conflict with the past and its devastating impact on the present. Paul Fisher's nightmare experiences in the shadow of his older brother come to a climax after the family moves from Houston...
Published on 16 Nov. 2006 by TeensReadToo

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not appropriate for most 12 year olds!
Psycho siblings and childhood trauma. I'm glad I decided to read this one before giving it to my son. The book has good character development and Mr. Bloor is clearly in touch with kids, but this book is definately for the older teen!! I was haunted by this one and would prefer to shield my kids while I still can.
Published on 15 Dec. 1997


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5.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too, 16 Nov. 2006
By 
TeensReadToo "Eat. Drink. Read. Be Merrier." (All Over the US & Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Tangerine (Paperback)
TANGERINE is a surreal novel strong in pacing and character development. From the opening page to the very end, Edward Bloor takes the reader on a breakneck course through one family's conflict with the past and its devastating impact on the present. Paul Fisher's nightmare experiences in the shadow of his older brother come to a climax after the family moves from Houston to Tangerine, Florida, a fallen Eden of sorts. He narrates his experiences in the new community with intensity and passion regarding the problems they face. A tension remains until the very end.

Paul is an outsider from the very beginning. He is the younger brother of teen football legend, Erik Fisher. Their father dotes on Erik, living out his own frustrated athletic dreams in a sad, pathetic manner. Their mother endures their father, holding the family together with equal parts denial, busy-ness, and critical intensity. She is hyper-involved in all of the family's business, a contrast to her husband, who is focused solely on Erik's success on the field. Both deliberately turn a blind eye to Erik's moral failings, which include a propensity for violence and a complete lack of empathy for others. He is a textbook sociopath and the world merely a gaggle of potential victims.

Bloor guides the reader through the novel's 300-plus pages building upon each character with incident upon incident that reveals their true nature and failings. Paul and his parents are forced to face their own cowardice and complicity at several key junctures of the story, particularly during the break-ins and the events that led to the death of Luis Cruz. Facing their failings leaves them broken, but broken for potential rebirth as a better family unit.

The novel's message builds upon itself through the evolution of each character: burying a wrong under a bushel of denial takes a terrible toll.

Highly recommended. 5 Stars!

Reviewed by: Mark Frye, author and reviewer
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4.0 out of 5 stars A great book with many surprises, 22 Oct. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Tangerine (Hardcover)
If you like mystery, soccer, and sibling rivalry, then Tangerine by Edward Bloor, is the book for you. Paul Fisher is legally blind and he has to wear "bottle-thick, bug-eyed glasses." Even though he is blind, he has an amazing ability to see people for what they really are. When Paul's family moved to Tangerine County, Florida, he got a chance to start over. Paul has grown up in the shadow of his self-obsorbed, football playing brother. His dad worships Paul's brother and never pays attention to him. Paul grows through his experiences at new schools, making friends, playing soccer, and tending a tangerine grove. This book is like many other books I have read. It is very straight forward and easy to understand. Bloor does an amazing job of drawing his reader's in. He hits that there is a secret in the Fisher family and you really want to read on to find out what it is. I read this entire 294 page book in a week. I couldn't put it down. This book was also appealing to me because I play soccer. It was very easy for me to relate to the stresses that come along with playing a sport. I could relate when Paul didn't make a starting position. I have always had to work to make the team. If you don't like soccer this book may not be for you. Soccer isn't the main point of the story, but it is something that Paul identifies with and it is something that he can really relate too. There is also a great deal of soccer "lingo" that may be hard to understand if you don't know about the sport. "Henry D. lifted a beautiful corner kick to Victor, who leaped and headed it into the goal." This would be confusing to anyone who doesn't know much about soccer. Tangerine has some great description in it. "The air had a gray tint to it, and a damp, foul smell like an ashtray." It was very easy to see this newly developed town. It was a great comparison of how Paul's family moving into a new house also represented a new beginning for Paul. It was his chance to make a name for himself. The way Bloor developed Paul was the best aspect of the story. He did a great job of showing how Paul changed through the story. Paul was nothing but the little brother of a great football player at the beginning of the story. But when Paul faced his fear, he learned how to be himself. "When disaster struck, we all had to do something. In a way, we all had to become something." By the end of the story, Paul had become someone. Anyone could read this book, but I recommend it to younger readers. It is not a very challenging plot. It was not too difficult or confusing and it was easy to understand. If you really like exciting plots and plots that make you think about hidden meanings, this book is not for you. Tangerine explains everything out very well and it's easy to follow. I recommend this book because it makes you realize that you need to make the most of your life. That you have to face your fears before you can become who you really want to be.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I do believe I'd give this one a Newbery, if only I could..., 8 Feb. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Tangerine (Paperback)
I think most of the reviews below do a thorough job of detailing the book. I would teach this in a middle school or high school reading class as it is written with a voice that would capture the readers of that age. It sure caught mine! I couldn't put it down. Bloor does a fantastic job of bringing his characters alive and giving them their own believable voice. He deals with racism, truth, fear, bravery, and normal school items that would hit home with many students. And, he does it in almost a haunting way. He almost made me afraid, not horrorlike, but afraid of being human, weak, an outsider. The way he writes about the affluent community and his mom's "worries", such as the neighbor with too many lightning rods on his house, is splendid.
The humor is sophisticated. There is a ton of stuff to talk about. The school gets sucked into a sinkhole, people are killed, the "muck" fires and mosquitoes plague the community and you love the protagonist. Enjoy!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not appropriate for most 12 year olds!, 15 Dec. 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Tangerine (Hardcover)
Psycho siblings and childhood trauma. I'm glad I decided to read this one before giving it to my son. The book has good character development and Mr. Bloor is clearly in touch with kids, but this book is definately for the older teen!! I was haunted by this one and would prefer to shield my kids while I still can.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This book is a winner!, 13 Jun. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Tangerine (Hardcover)
It contains many elements that young readers love. Mystery, sports, and sibling rivalry are just a few. The main character, Paul is easy to identify with. He is legally blind but doesn't let his handicap stop him. I am a teacher in Florida and my students fought over this book. This book is full of interesting information. I can teach many things through the book that relate to Florida such as; sinkholes, muck fires, lightning, and the citrus industry. This book should be a contender for the Newberry Award as well as a Sunshine State winner. There is even more exciting news, I found out that Mr. Bloor is already working on his second novel which is also set in Florida.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Story of Fight and Courage Not Just For the Young!, 14 Jun. 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Tangerine (Hardcover)
I ordered this book on the basis of the Amazon young adult editor's review and I was not disappointed. I could hardly put this book down. I was drawn by Paul's character throughout the book, not your typical hero, but instead someone who "sees" things more clearly than those with better eyesight. I loved this book which shows that ability, popularity, and toughness are not what is important, it is people and really seeing them. It is well-written, excellenty plotted, drawing the reader along with the idea of finding out what really happened to Paul when he was five years old. This book is not just for young adults -- I am 32 and I loved it!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A PAGE-TURNER THAT SCORES, 7 Sept. 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Tangerine (Hardcover)
Ed Bloor's novel "Tangerine", the story of an

11-year-old legally blind soccer goalie with a

sinister charmer for an older brother, is a

page-turner that scores at once as a mystery

thriller, a morality tale and a tribute to a

child's awesome courage in battling psychic

and physical obstacles that would daunt most

heroes of fact and fantasy. Alfred Hitchcock

would have made this into a smash-hit. Maybe

someone else will.

Hans Knight,writer and critic.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Thoughful and intelligent, I couldn't put it down., 27 Jun. 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Tangerine (Hardcover)
What a wonderful way to find a book. This was the first young adult book sent to me as a Amazon recommendation and I couldn't have been more pleased. The characters are well drawn and believeable. The events that surround the community are so ordinary, but Edaward Bloor lets us 'see' in a new light. I am teacher and I can't wait for school to start to recommend this book to my students. One young friend of mine read it on my recommedation and finished it in an afternoon. I will be anxiously awaiting his next book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Thoughful and intelligent, I couldn't put it down., 27 Jun. 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Tangerine (Hardcover)
What a wonderful way to find a book. This was the first young adult book sent to me as a Amazon recommendation and I couldn't have been more pleased. The characters are well drawn and believeable. The events that surround the community are so ordinary, but Edaward Bloor lets us 'see' in a new light. I am teacher and I can't wait for school to start to recommend this book to my students. One young friend of mine read it on my recommedation and finished it in an afternoon. I will be anxiously awaiting his next book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This should have won an award last year., 16 Mar. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Tangerine (Hardcover)
Bloor, a new name in YA, has written a wonderful story about a handicapped boy who is struggling with his disability, trying to compete to be recognized like his brother is recognized in the eyes of his father and this boy's emotional trauma that he suffered at the hands of his brother. I just thought that this was a refreshing tale that I could not put down. It's got the mystery quality and sports theme that will appeal to most YA boys. It is in my middle school library and it isoften signed out.
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