Customer Reviews

104
4.1 out of 5 stars
206 Bones: (Temperance Brennan 12)
Format: HardcoverChange
Price:£18.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

62 of 65 people found the following review helpful
on 20 August 2009
206 Bones sees Temperance Brennan trying to solve the murders of several elderly women, trying to save her own reputation as well as her own life. The story is mostly set in Montreal, as she uses her skills with bones to find the murderer along with her partner Andrew Ryan. The story was a good quick read, the book not being very long but the story entertaining. You had the opportunity of two whodunits, one the murderer and the other the person trying to sabotage her work. I would have preferred the story to move her relationship with Ryan on further, but maybe she is saving that for another book, and the story to generally of been longer. However really enjoyed the book and waiting for the next one.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on 1 October 2009
I always look forward to the next instalment of Kathy Reichs' Tempe Brennan series. However, 206 Bones seemed to be lacking something. Tempe and Andrew Ryan are on the hunt for the killer of several elderly women. The plot is all there, with the usual twists, turns and forensic details, but sadly it left me cold. Perhaps it's because many of the usual characters didn't feature, or perhaps because the text is very heavy on dialogue. I just hope the author isn't getting tired of the series.

This is probably worth reading if you're a Kathy Reichs fan, but it's certainly not her best. If you're new to the books don't start here, read one of the early books.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
31 of 34 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 23 August 2009
I look forward to the next Kathy Reichs book and have read them all. I've tended to prefer her books to those of Patricia Cornwell: the latter having a more abrasive and cruder style of writing, but I think that Reichs is moving a bit closer in this regard to Cornwell. Reich's is in real life a forensic anthropologist and it shows in the authentic medical and scientific details which add to my enjoyment of her books. The gradual unravelling of how four older women died and the attempt to identify bones immersed in water for decades are the engrossing and powerful central themes of the book. Tempe Brennan's on-off relationship with detective Ryan always adds a bit of light-relief and in this book he's a central character in the final solution to what happened to some of the victims. There is another thread to the book concerning sabotaging of forensic evidence that adds to the complexity and interest but I wouldn't elaborate so not to spoil the surprise that comes near the end of the novel.

I would have given the book five stars but for a strange aspect to the construction of the book: chapters 1, 11, 27, 40 and 41 are typeset in italics. At first I thought it was supposed to be the heroine, Temperance Brennan, having a recurring nightmare and that it is a strange way to start a book as it didn't seem to have any bearing on the following chapters. Then same again at Chapters 11 and 27. The other two italicized chapters (40 and 41) were in the same vein but what I thought was a nightmare turns out to be actually happening. Maybe I'm missing something, but why presage an event that is important as part of the final denouement? Another minus point for me is, yet, again Tempe is abducted and in mortal danger connected with her work. I think the author has over-played that theme.
66 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 6 November 2010
I'm not altogether sure about this series. They are become more and more like the Patricia Cornwall books, and that irritates me. I really don't like those books.

In this book Temperence Brennan has to help work out who the murderer of some old age pensioners are, while trying to date (as in age) some bodies in a lake (are they a family who crashed from a plan or in an old boat accident that occurred years ago) and manage some testy relations in the Quebec Coroners' Office (the old manager has gone and the staff are dealing with a new boss with a different style).

So why is this book like a Patricia Cornwall book? Well setting aside the whole forensic link, if you look at Cornwall's more recent books, Scarpetta has an increasing number of enemies as the series progresses. This trend has started here, and it's starting to irritate me. Why do authors assume that a strong female role has to have someone to actively "do them down?" Life isn't like that and their books don't have to be either.

The book is standard Reichs fair but the "us against them" feel to the book irritated me some.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 14 January 2010
206 Bones is the usual Kathy Reichs format, which is like a security blanket to me. Don't like coming out of my comfort zone as far as my fave authors are concerned. The only difference with this one was that Tempe's fate at the hands of the murderer, which usually happens in the last chapter before she's rescued by her knight in shining armour, Ryan, starts off the book, then plays in flashback mode.
I find her relationship with Ryan a bit frustrating, given that she's with him, then not, with him, then not. Why doesn't she just go for it, and to hell with the consequences? Kathy Reichs is obviously keeping the fires burning under the couple for future books, but it can be a bit annoying for the reader.
A short book which zips along nicely, but I too, like other reviewers, had the perp sussed almost from the start. This didn't detract from my enjoyment though. Bring on the next one Kathy.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
43 of 49 people found the following review helpful
I used to be a big fan of Reichs's books but, as time moves om, her books have not. They have become predictable and frankly, boring. This is following the downward spiral, I'm afraid. Her first books were brilliant, in sharp contrast to Cornwell. Now both just put words on to a paper and hope their many fans will buy them - they usually do. Today, there are far better thriller writers around with a serial killer theme running through them - Chelsea Cain - to name one - is, at the moment, streets ahead.

I do really hope that Reichs lifts her game. But Tempe Brennan has become almost an oddball. I just don't get why she has to solve any murder and why each time she turns detective her life is threatened by doing so. Maybe it's the fad these days to give 'experts' more room to move (Waking The Dead has done the same in their latest TV series) but I hanker after something more involved, not a guided tour of Montreal whilst providing 2 hours-worth of not very exciting nor very convincing story-telling.

Sorry fans and no doubt you'll disagree but there we are. I keep threatening not to read her books; this time, this is the last until I read somewhere that Reichs has found a new and improved formula.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 28 September 2010
I used to quite like Temp Brennan but in this book Kathy Reichs has presented her as a hard-nosed, arrogant, flippant show-off. She`s become a missy perfect Nellie know-all, in fact a pretty dislikeable attitude all round. Did she always come across as having to be one-up on everyone including Ryan? I don`t think so. Won`t be buying any more Kathy Reichs novels.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 8 January 2010
You know from the outset that Tempe is in trouble, and her determination to extricate herself is well described and made me shiver. The rest of the novel unfolds almost as flashbacks, including some nasty office (lab) politiking and gameplaying and although I quickly sussed who was at the root of this and why, it didn't impact on my enjoyment of the gradual uncovering of the criminal element of the tale - the murders of elderly women. To some extent, I wondered whether the novel is in part a screenplay - it would transfer very well as a two part epidode of "Bones". (Tho all of the lab geeks in "Bones" are far too nice to ever sink to the depths of gameplaying described here!) A great read whilst snowbound!!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
What perhaps has gotten to readers of Reichs' over the years is Brennan's unnerving ability to be permanently right and never to suffer from self doubt which has caused a number of readers to fall out with Kathy's writing. As a fan I was more than happy with this offering, I got what I've come to expect from her writing, a cracking story, character growth and above all a mystery that keeps me guessing up to the last few pages. With this offering many of Kathy's fans will be happier with the way that she's returned to an earlier writing form and given Tempe a bit of discomfort as she has to learn that she's not always right.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 2 November 2013
206 Bones is the 12th installment of spunky forensic anthropologist Temperance "Tempe" Brennan, who splits her time between La Belle Province (Quebec) and North Carolina working to identify victims' remains. In 206 Bones, Tempe gets to return to her old stomping grounds of Chicago. As in other Tempe novels, there are several separate cases that Tempe is working on at the same time. Tempe is searching for clues about several elderly women that have been brutally murdered, along with a missing grandson and the possible remains of a planeload of vacationers from decades ago. The novel starts off with a bang as Tempe wakes up apparently blind, bound and with amnesia regarding recent events. This device is used to great effect between chapters as the action segues into the events that led to Tempe's current predicament.

Reichs' excellent character descriptions really make the secondary characters come alive, from sleazy Chicago lawyers to creepy ex-cons fingered as suspects. Tempe is still testing the waters with former flame and coworker Andrew Ryan and she spends time with her ex-husband Pete's boisterous Latvian in-laws. Her wonderful boss Pierre LaManche is out convalescing from bypass surgery, and the office climate takes a nosedive with the appearance of the mysterious newcomer Marie-Andréa Briel.The pacing was perfect, with the tense present interludes sliding seamlessly into the facets of the investigations that led to the present. The resolutions to the various stories were plausible without overreaching as in some previous Tempe novels, and Tempe is in fine form. There's an interesting new complication with Tempe's cat Birdie and Tempe's obnoxious new neighbor Sparky.

My only gripe was with the final chapters. First, the explanation for Tempe's situation; the villain seemed unlikely, from previous hints, and the motivation seemed kind of far-fetched. Also, on the very last page, Tempe gets on her soapbox about the various board examinations for forensics. It would been appropriate as an afterword, but having Tempe preach "Accreditation is a rigorous process. Those letters behind a scientist's name aren't just for show. They're hard-earned. And they're a message that an expert has undergone peer scrutiny and meets a high set of ethical standards," etc. just felt forced and out of place as the novel was winding to a close, more as a personal note from the author than in character for Tempe and Ryan in an otherwise picture-perfect moment in front of the fire (the Acknowledgements also dedicates the book to Reichs' board-certified colleagues, with a list of the various boards).

Otherwise, I greatly enjoyed 206 Bones, perhaps more than some of Tempe's recent (mis)adventures. The tense pacing, the brutality of some of the cases, the hunt for suspects, the quirky in-laws and luscious food descriptions (reminding me of my own Polish relatives) and variety of locations all made for an engrossing read.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Bones of the Lost: (Temperance Brennan 16)
Bones of the Lost: (Temperance Brennan 16) by Kathy Reichs (Paperback - 31 July 2014)
£3.85

Bones Are Forever: (Temperance Brennan 15)
Bones Are Forever: (Temperance Brennan 15) by Kathy Reichs (Paperback - 15 Aug. 2013)
£3.85

Flash and Bones: (Temperance Brennan 14)
Flash and Bones: (Temperance Brennan 14) by Kathy Reichs (Paperback - 5 July 2012)
£5.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.