Customer Reviews


3 Reviews
5 star:
 (1)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Vampires & Al Capone?
New Adventures Novel 272 pages, Seventh Doctor, Ace & Bernice Summerfield.

Trivia.
Dekker also features in Terrance Dicks Sixth Doctor novel Players.

Synopsis.
Dekker is a Private Eye who is sent to see the Boss Al Capone who wants Dekker to investigate the mysterious "Doc" who is running his own bar with companion Ace as the time...
Published 1 month ago by timelord007

versus
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars No surprises
There are two items on the cover of BLOOD HARVEST that should tell every Doctor Who fan exactly what to expect. The first is the extremely silly looking vampire that's being repelled by Benny holding a flashlight. The second, of course, is the name Terrance Dicks. Terrance Dicks doesn't really surprise us too much these days. We know what sorts of stories he tells,...
Published on 6 Jan 2003 by Andrew McCaffrey


Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Vampires & Al Capone?, 14 Mar 2014
By 
timelord007 (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Blood Harvest (Doctor Who New Adventures) (Paperback)
New Adventures Novel 272 pages, Seventh Doctor, Ace & Bernice Summerfield.

Trivia.
Dekker also features in Terrance Dicks Sixth Doctor novel Players.

Synopsis.
Dekker is a Private Eye who is sent to see the Boss Al Capone who wants Dekker to investigate the mysterious "Doc" who is running his own bar with companion Ace as the time travellers are selling illegal bootleg Liquor in the prohibition era in 1929 Chicago.

Meanwhile Benny is stranded on a planet overun with vampires were she meets the mysterious Timelady Romana as they are togeher in the E-Space universe as they discover a evil malevolent power in a lair of evil that links to event's in 1929 Chicago.

Could these event's have anything to do with a former adventure that links to the Doctors past?

Timelord Thoughts.
Terrance Dicks bless him is what I call the Godfather of Doctor Who as he was script editor on the Pertwee era & has written another gem of a story here that features the vampire planet seen in his 1980's tv story E-Space story State Of Decay.

This time it's Benny & Romana who are stranded with the bloodsucking vampires as the Doctor & Ace are running a bar in prohibition era Chicago who's illicit actions bring them to the attention of Al Capone.

What event's link these two plot threads together? could it be a past adventure in the Doctors Fifth incarnation that holds the answer to this mystery perhaps?

Terrance Dicks has written a outrageous, Hilarious, Scary, Exciting novel that delves deep into Doctor Who history but sets an uneven tone to the novel as mixing the two story's together doesn't quite work as it feels it's neither a full vampire story or a humourous Gangster adventure & the big bad is easily dealt at the end of this novel which makes the plot lose some of it's tension.

But the good mostly outweighs the bad & together with companion piece Goth Opera this is a nice nostalgic read featuring a host of cameos & a well paced adventure.

A entertaining recommended Doctor Who novel.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars No surprises, 6 Jan 2003
By 
Andrew McCaffrey (Satellite of Love, Maryland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Blood Harvest (Doctor Who New Adventures) (Paperback)
There are two items on the cover of BLOOD HARVEST that should tell every Doctor Who fan exactly what to expect. The first is the extremely silly looking vampire that's being repelled by Benny holding a flashlight. The second, of course, is the name Terrance Dicks. Terrance Dicks doesn't really surprise us too much these days. We know what sorts of stories he tells, and the only unknown variable in his equation is how promising the execution will be rather than what level of ambition he'll be aiming at. Fortunately, BLOOD HARVEST, while far from being his best work, is an enjoyable enough romp through Chicago mobs of the 1920's and several previous Doctor Who adventures.
As the story begins, the Doctor and Ace are running a rather generic speakeasy in 1929 Chicago. References to mob movies (and, oddly, Casablanca) abound, and what the narrative lacks in originality, it more than makes up for in entertainment. The Doctor's tavern is only a cover while he investigates some strange goings-on in the area, but the sequences concerning the local politics and crime are far and away the more enjoyable sections. The supposed science-fiction element to the story is neither inspired nor adequately explained and comes purely as an interruption to the fun pulp novel that's being told. It's really a pity that Dicks decided not to have the Doctor running the speakeasy just for the sheer hell of it. It would have eliminated the need to have a lot of the non-Chicago scenes, which do have a dragging effect during the rest of the book. For a story that steams ahead at times purely by sheer entertainment and fun, it's oddly jarring when the author tries (and fails) to tie things up into a logical and boring little point.
Benny spends most of the adventure being digitally inserted into location footage from STATE OF DECAY and wandering through those studio sets (while there's unfortunately no Tom Baker nibbling on this dusted-off scenery, there's also no Matthew Waterhouse which comes as no small relief). Other reviewers have complained of the story merely rehashing the adventures that have come before, and while I can't totally disagree with this point of view, I feel that the case has been somewhat overstated. For me, the beginning of the Benny subplot served as a needed reminder of the main events of the previous story. Unfortunately, there is a case for pointing out that the later sections tend to simply repeat the previous story more often than they build anything new. Strangely enough, the portions that do invent new material do so by getting several details about the previous serial wrong. In these passages, Dicks was probably being far more creative than he realized.
Terrence Dicks has always subscribed to the idea of never writing four words when one will suffice. But at the conclusion to this story he takes that philosophy to extreme lengths: never write a concluding chapter, when a sentence will do. The final thirty-five pages end the book in a bizarre sort of sequel to THE FIVE DOCTORS and to say that it feels a little abbreviated is to say the cover of MAD DOGS AND ENGLISHMEN is a little bright. The book flies through revelations and plot-twists faster than the news of rec.arts.drwho.moderated going live went through on-line fandom. The main villain of the story goes from being completely in command to being utterly defeated, literally inside a single paragraph (it's right there on page 279, if you don't believe me). It's impossible to take this sort of thing seriously, and I would advise any potential reader to just sit back and enjoy the ride. To look for logic and seriousness in a story where Terrance Dicks is just trying to have a good time is a fruitless task.
It relies a bit too heavily on coincidences for my liking, but overall I still found myself enjoying BLOOD HARVEST. The sequences of the Doctor and Ace running a prohibition-era speakeasy carry the rest of the book. Even during the more boring parts, I didn't find the book to be anything less than adequate. It's got some definite flaws, and while many of them are major, none are fatal. As a fan I enjoyed it, but I have no idea how anything without some serious knowledge of Who history could even understand major portions of it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A bloody marvel!, 14 Nov 2005
This review is from: Blood Harvest (Doctor Who New Adventures) (Paperback)
Another triumph for the series! Wittingly or no, Mr Dicks decided to follow Andy Lane’s scintillating All-consuming Fire with a historical Doctor Who adventure of his own. This time the TARDIS crew find themselves in 1930s Chicago and mixing it with the infamous Al Capone, amongst others.
What TD does so well is to keep it simple; like some of the classic Who scripts that he produced for the BBC (The Power of Kroll, The Mutants, Revenge of the Cybermen amongst others) the style is pacy yet taut and the action unencumbered with excessive sci-fi jargon or bickering associates.
This is how State of Decay could have been if it were a full-length DW novel – and for once the nod to the classic series and the continuation of one of its stories is inspired and appropriate. Romana’s return (the Lalla Ward version of course) is a treat for faithful fans and for once Benny & Ace have meatier roles and their presence doesn’t grate. If you only read two - The New Doctor Who Adventures - novels, then this has to be one of them.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xa0a8aae0)

This product

Blood Harvest (Doctor Who New Adventures)
Blood Harvest (Doctor Who New Adventures) by Terrance Dicks (Paperback - 21 July 1994)
Used & New from: 1.66
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews