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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
87
3.5 out of 5 stars
Format: Mass Market Paperback|Change
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on 27 January 2013
Most American authors when setting a story in England, peopled with English characters have the courtesy to get the details right. Within the first few pages I encountered several sidewalks, the police detective wore a snapbrim which later turned into a snapbrim fedora (neither of which are appropriate) and the victim's purse (handbag) was missing. The American spellings too proved annoying. This language laziness eventually distracted from the storyline and I started to notice historical accuracies. e.g the News of the World in wartime was not a tabloid in any sense of the word. The story itself moves at a fast pace but with no real depth, and all of the factual details about the real people and places of the period(Agatha Christie, Bernard Spilsbury, the Windmill...) began to take over from the fiction. I started the book this morning. Can I be bothered to finish it?
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on 21 June 2013
I found myself being more and more irritated by the American terms used in this book - if a book is set in London and aimed at an English audience I feel an effort should be made to avoid too many American terms. Sidewalk, purse (instead of handbag), fedora hat etc all became so irritating that they were a distraction to the story - which wasn't too good anyway. If the story had been set in New York the language would have been appropriate and added local colour, but in a book set in London it just spoils it.
The 'collaboration' between Spilsbury and Agatha Christie doesn't work either - just too implausible.
I also disliked the way in which a real set of murders by Gordon Cummins has been used as the basis for this fictionalised account - it detracts from the real forensics and detection of the case. If you're going to write about a fictional collaboration between pathologist and fiction writer then it would have been much better to have a fictional murder too - using a real murder seems to be a lazy way of doing things. The more I read, the less impressed I was by the book. Can't recommend it.
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on 12 February 2013
Dialogue absolutely infuriating. An American view of Londoners dialect. Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins springs to mind.
The use of the Agatha Christie character fails miserably.
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on 19 July 2013
In the first chapter describing war time London the author says " broken windows had become the exception, not the rule"??? I should have stopped there but decided to keep going thinking it can only get better - silly me. One of the worst books I have ever tried to read. Not worth anyone's time.
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on 12 February 2013
I bought two books by Max Collins "Titanic" which was V Good and this which to me was awfull. It was all about Agatha Christie and a very poor storyline.
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on 1 September 2013
Avoid and spare yourself comparing the narrative with Dick Van Dyke`s character in Mary Poppins. And an obsession with blue eyes.
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on 30 January 2013
Sorry but I didn't think much of this book l was looking forward to a good murder mystery but what a disappointment Scotland yard would never let anyone else get involved . Unbelevable.
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on 27 January 2013
For a mystery based on real events, there was simply not enough detail and not enough suspense. Really could have been better, in line with a Louis Bayard or Matthew Pearl, as a real person taking part in true events. A good enough mystery but not enough darkness, suspense, or fear. But interesting and enjoyable enough to want to read more of the series.
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on 15 May 2013
Trash cans, sidewalks, etc.. in wartime London? It's a pity the author didn't research the English language and word useage.
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on 24 November 2013
Having read the first few pages of this, I think it is truly dreadful. Cliched, with anachronisms, and Americanisms, it is clear that the author does not research, nor does he have the talent to write a novel.
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