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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant as Usual
Once again we meet Kay Scarpetta, Medical Examiner for Virginia. The murders keep coming. This time there is a connection between five dismembered bodies found in Ireland some time ago and four more in Virginia. Victim ten seems to be different, a copy cat killing, but then comes another body which announces that the killer has obtained the smallpox virus which could...
Published on 1 May 2002 by pennymwood2

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Unnatural Exposure
You could review this book, number eight in the Dr Kay Scarpetta books by Patricia Cornwell, one of two ways.
On the one hand it is another good solid addition to the Scarpetta series of thrillers. It has all the usual ingredients, gory discoverings, Scarpetta's scientific examinations, a ruthless killer and the usual accompanying characters.
One the other hand...
Published on 5 Mar 2005 by Rich Milligan


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Unnatural Exposure, 5 Mar 2005
By 
Rich Milligan (Thatcham, Berkshire) - See all my reviews
You could review this book, number eight in the Dr Kay Scarpetta books by Patricia Cornwell, one of two ways.
On the one hand it is another good solid addition to the Scarpetta series of thrillers. It has all the usual ingredients, gory discoverings, Scarpetta's scientific examinations, a ruthless killer and the usual accompanying characters.
One the other hand it is another good solid addition to the Scarpetta series of thrillers that offers nothing new to what has gone before. Indeed some of the regular characters are becoming so changed from their original conception you really wonder if you want to carry on with the series. There's not enough of Pete Marino in this book for a start, niece Lucy is still an enormous pain in the neck and Benton Wesley seems to be becoming a needy wimp with his constant whinging to Scarpetta. Scarpetta herself is so driven at times she must be an absolute nightmare to work for.
What the series really needs is an insertion of some new blood, or at the very least the re-introduction of some the excellent minor characters we saw in previous offerings. Why can't sister Dorothy, who has only made one actual appearance in "The Body Farm", or even lawyer Nicholas Grueman who appeared in "Cruel and Unusual" reappear in some form or another to give the series a much needed injection of life.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars ANOTHER KAY SCARPETTA MYSTERY..., 1 Jan 2003
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This is a somewhat interesting, Dr. Kay Scarpetta mystery, replete with its usual attention to forensic detail, as well as a myriad of subplots, contributing to the tension that is tautly maintained throughout the book. Though not her best novel, this one still manages to entertain the reader.
Once again, Dr. Scarpetta, Chief Medical Examiner, finds herself on the hunt for a serial killer, when the body of an elderly, dismembered woman is discovered in a Virginia landfill. Moreover, a mutated, high tech, small pox variant virus appears to be on the loose, and Dr. Scarpetta finds herself receiving taunting emails from the alleged killer, signing as "deadoc". Couple all this with an overly ambitious and unscrupulous law enforcement agent named Percy Ring who arrests an obviously innocent man for the elderly woman's death, and the reader has an intriguing mystery to unravel.
Homicide Detective Pete Marino is pivotal to the success of this book. His relationship and repartee with Dr. Scarpetta contribute to many of the book's highlights, and it is he who gives dimension to the book, as he is simply a wonderful, down to earth character. Dr. Scarpetta's relationship with FBI Agent Wesley Benton is less memorable, as he is on the periphery of the story, for the most part, though in the end he provides closure for the torch Dr. Scarpetta was carrying for her ex-lover, Mark.
The only real fly in the ointment, however, is the continued appearance of Dr. Scarpetta's niece, Lucy, who is an obnoxious character. In the real world, Lucy would not be allowed to hold the positions of responsibility that she does in the book, due to her compete immaturity. She is a loose cannon waitng to misfire at any moment. It flies in the face of her professionalism that Dr. Scarpetta seems unable to fathom this, but blood is thicker than water.
The ending is somewhat surprising, though in retrospect, the clues are, in fact, there for the reader to discern the identity of the killer. The problem is that the resolution occurs almost too abruptly, as if the author had only a limited number of pages in which to wrap it all up. While the book moves somewhat slowly for the most part, the last few chapters move at lightening speed. A better editing job may have helped make this book into a more cohesive, better written mystery. Still, Kay Scarpetta fans will find something to enjoy in this offering.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant as Usual, 1 May 2002
Once again we meet Kay Scarpetta, Medical Examiner for Virginia. The murders keep coming. This time there is a connection between five dismembered bodies found in Ireland some time ago and four more in Virginia. Victim ten seems to be different, a copy cat killing, but then comes another body which announces that the killer has obtained the smallpox virus which could mean death to millions. And the murderer is speaking to Scarpetta, threatening her family and friends as well as her and challenging her to bring him or her to justice. These Scarpetta novels keep readers on their toes and although they stand alone it makes it easier to read them in sequence.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars what a brilliant book!, 14 Nov 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Unnatural Exposure (Paperback)
Unnatural Exposure is the first of Patricia Cornwell's book's I have had the pleasure to read, the storyline had me hooked from the moment I picked up the book, where it all started in Ireland and soon linked back to Dr Kay Scarpetta's home town richmond, virginia. A possible connection between murders on both sides of the atlantic, which makes for a very good storyline with some very gripping chapters, such as Dr kay scarpetta falling ill just as the killers leathel weapon is exposed - smallpox.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Ridiculous ending - must try harder, 31 May 2007
Right up to the end, this book is excellent - making the obvious allowance that Scarpetta just has to keep sticking her elegant nose into the police investigation and the police, for some unaccountable reason, don't tell her to shove off, as they certainly would in real life.

But the ending! I won't reveal the name of the villain, but it's almost as if the author got to about page 340 without having the slightest idea who the murderer was, and then picked the single most unlikely character in the entire book as the bad guy - or girl, in this case.

And this girl is a REALLY bad girl. She's infected her mother with smallpox that she stole two decades earlier from a laboratory in England, and has managed to keep viable in all that time. She then cut her mother into small pieces with an electric saw, after lopping her head off while she was still alive, and photographed the result. Then she filled atomiser sprays with smallpox virus and sent them out to selected victims. Oh, and shot to death an intruder along the way. But why? Why this catalogue of discriminate - and indiscriminate - assassination? Well, she didn't get the promotion she was hoping for and, as we all know, hell hath no fury like a woman who doesn't get the job she wants, so it all makes really good sense. It doesn't, of course. It makes no sense at all.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Socialism - in Ireland?, 8 Aug 2010
By 
I liked this book. I think she writes well and her work is never less than gripping. I just have one reservation, which is why I have given her four stars. Did anyone notice that at the start of the book, she has an Irish state pathologist in Dublin grumbling about not having enough resources because of socialism? Socialism? In Ireland? It seems to me that Patricia Cornwell has conflated her experiences of meeting someone in England with a visit to Ireland, as the Republic of Ireland has never had a socialist government. Is she being an Ugly American here? "Britain, the Republic of Ireland, Iceland - I can't remember. It was somewhere in Europe ..." If so, that's a bit disappointing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No way of putting down, 23 Nov 2000
By A Customer
As usual, I highly enjoyed this Patricia Cornwell book. I found it very interesting to read - especially because of the medical point of view. Surprinsingly, this Cornwell book was in my eyes not as crucial as the earlier ones. The only negative comment I want to make refers to the end of the book. I think that the whole story about smallpox stretches too much and the ending is to abrupt and short. I can still recommend it to anyone who likes pathologist and medical examiner stories. Buy it - enjoy it - and trust me, you won't be able to put it down until you're finished.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Starts well, ends badly, 16 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Unnatural Exposure (Paperback)
I liked the storyline for this book. However I thought the wrap up of the story was poor and in particular the character of Scarpetta goes way off the rails at the end with no real motivation. I'm hoping the rest of the series is better than this (I'd only read point of origin before).
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still excellent, 6 Feb 2005
By A Customer
I will still give this book the highest mark, although I found its ending implausibly hurried. (Which made that I could read the book twice within two years or so, having forgotten the solution.) I also agree with another reviewer who thinks that Kay Scarpetta mysteries would be a lot better without the appearance of Lucy. But I wonder why nobody to my knowledge has remarked on another point. I duly accept the professional quality of the forensic stuff, knowing nothing about the area. But when Cornwell talks about computers, I feel that she tries to impress the reader with a lot of abbreviations and technical terms and to create an aura of mysticism about actually quite simple facts that are decribed better elsewhere. Which makes you doubt about the accuracy of the forensic stuff.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars ANOTHER KAY SCARPETTA MYSTERY..., 10 Mar 2003
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This is a somewhat interesting, Dr. Kay Scarpetta mystery, replete with its usual attention to forensic detail, as well as a myriad of subplots, contributing to the tension that is tautly maintained throughout the book. Though not her best novel, this one still manages to entertain the reader.
Once again, Dr. Scarpetta, Chief Medical Examiner, finds herself on the hunt for a serial killer, when the body of an elderly, dismembered woman is discovered in a Virginia landfill. Moreover, a mutated, high tech, small pox variant virus appears to be on the loose, and Dr. Scarpetta finds herself receiving taunting emails from the alleged killer, signing as "deadoc". Couple all this with an overly ambitious and unscrupulous law enforcement agent named Percy Ring who arrests an obviously innocent man for the elderly woman's death, and the reader has an intriguing mystery to unravel.
Homicide Detective Pete Marino is pivotal to the success of this book. His relationship and repartee with Dr. Scarpetta contribute to many of the book's highlights, and it is he who gives dimension to the book, as he is simply a wonderful, down to earth character. Dr. Scarpetta's relationship with FBI Agent Wesley Benton is less memorable, as he is on the periphery of the story, for the most part, though in the end he provides closure for the torch Dr. Scarpetta was carrying for her ex-lover, Mark.
The only real fly in the ointment, however, is the continued appearance of Dr. Scarpetta's niece, Lucy, who is an obnoxious character. In the real world, Lucy would not be allowed to hold the positions of responsibility that she does in the book, due to her complete immaturity. She is a loose cannon waitng to misfire at any moment. It flies in the face of her professionalism that Dr. Scarpetta seems unable to fathom this, but blood is thicker than water.
The ending is somewhat surprising, though in retrospect, the clues are, in fact, there for the reader to discern the identity of the killer. The problem is that the resolution occurs almost too abruptly, as if the author had only a limited number of pages in which to wrap it all up. While the book moves somewhat slowly for the most part, the last few chapters move at lightening speed. A better editing job may have helped make this book into a more cohesive, better written mystery. Still, Kay Scarpetta fans will find something to enjoy in this offering.
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Unnatural Exposure (Kay Scarpetta)
Unnatural Exposure (Kay Scarpetta) by Patricia Cornwell (Mass Market Paperback - 27 Aug 1998)
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