Customer Reviews


8 Reviews
5 star:
 (8)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An enthralling sequal to The Seven Crystal Balls., 5 Jan 2002
By A Customer
If you've read The Seven Crystal Balls and are gaging to read the sequal then here it is! This engaging comic follows Snowy, Tintin and his coif to Peru in search of the kidnapped Professor Cuthbert Calcus!
Now that all seven members of the Sanders-Hardiman expedition are in a strange hypnotic sleep its up to Tintin to solve the mystery!
We also wait in anticipation to see if Captain Haddock can survive without his spare monocles!
A excellent read!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WOW, 7 Dec 2011
By 
This is one cartoon character which doesn't need any review. Every single story is a favourite of mine and I wish they would turn each of that into a motion picture. An excellent addition to my Tintin collection.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The one with the total eclipse of the sun, 6 July 2010
By 
Keris Nine - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Prisoners of the Sun is the second part of a story started in The Seven Crystal Balls, but really, until very late in the adventure, there's little reference made to events in the earlier book and consequently, there's no need to have read the previous book, terrific though it is (one of the best Tintin adventures, in fact), since as far as second part is concerned, it can be summed up as... Calculus has been kidnapped.

Well, ok, to expand slightly on that - since it's a regular occurrence in Tintin adventures - Calculus has been kidnapped and taken to Peru, although the reasons for his abduction are rather flimsy, it seeming to be on account of him inadvertently picking up and wearing a precious artefact belonging to the mummy of the ancient Inca ruler Rascar Capac (which seems to have disappeared, vaporised in a ball of lightning in the last book). All you really need to know is that Tintin, Snowy and Captain Haddock are in Peru to try to rescue Calculus from persons unknown, since no-one seems to being willing to give them clues as to who might be holding the Professor. Showing kindness to one young Peruvian boy, Zorrino, however Tintin finally gets a lead and a guide to take him to the mysterious and secret Inca site of the Temple of the Sun.

The abandoning of many of the mystic elements of The Seven Crystal Balls is slightly disappointingly, Prisoners of the Sun becoming much more rational in its explanations and more like a typical Tintin adventure, but in a way this just provides a strong balance for the earlier half. Having used the earlier book as a set-up (and what a set-up!), Prisoners of the Sun just goes for all out adventure in a way not seen since Cigars of the Pharaoh. Consequently, it's one of the most memorable of Tintin books, creating a strong impression particularly on younger readers, for the terrific variety and extremes of terrain that the adventurers have to cross. Snow-covered mountain passes, verdant tropical jungles, rocky deserts and vast waterfalls, all of them are beautifully rendered by Hergé and his studio of artists, each of the locations filled with potential hazards and populated by dangerous exotic animals - llamas ("perambulating fire-pumps" as Haddock memorably describes them), boa constrictors, condors, tapirs, bears, ant-eaters and alligators - that fire the imagination and keep the story moving from one magnificent and thrilling sequence to the next.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A top Tintin (but read part one first!), 10 Jan 2010
By 
Henk Beentje "Henk Beentje" (Kew, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
The second part of a 2-part series, this comes after 'the seven crystal balls' and was first published in 1949. I think this is on a par with the excellent 'Tintin in Tibet' in being a good all-round adventure story, pretty scary in places (at least for a 7-to-10-year old), respectful of other cultures and anti-racist. The drawing and coloration is top-notch, the setting (Peru) is great, the quest is noble - it is all here, it is all good. My only quibble is that the trick by which our heroes escape from a horrible fate (I can't give away the plot, of course - don't want to spoil it for anyone!) is rather unbelievable - the Inca were pretty sophisticated where that particular subject was concerned.

Altogether an excellent story. If you are new to the Tintin series, I would start with Tintin in Tibet, the Cigars of the Pharaoh, or Land of Black Gold; but as a follow-up, this 2-parter is excellent fodder for kids and the young-at-heart alike.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great as always, 11 Mar 2014
By 
Chess Quant (Sydney, Australia) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Its Tin, tin you know what you are going to get, but I feel this was one of the better ones as they climb through the mountains and jungles of Peru.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars great as always, 9 Dec 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
great stories and pictures and alwys adventure, my 6 year old son loves them and reads them with me and by himself
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A great 2 part adventure, 23 July 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Superb Tintin story with fantastic illustrations as per usual.
But do get the the Seven Crystal Balls first as this is a two part adventure with lots of references to the first part.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great comic books, 15 Dec 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
We have bought lots of these books and our children keep requesting more (ages 7, 9 and 10). They are an excellent way of encouraging a reluctant reader, although they all seem to love them (boys and girl)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Prisoners of the Sun
Prisoners of the Sun by Herge (Hardcover - Mar 1973)
Used & New from: 2.78
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews