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Intertextuality (The New Critical Idiom)
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 19 January 2001
After tracing the 'origins' of the concept of intertextuality from Saussure and Bakhtin's dialogism, to Kristeva and Barthes, Allen gives a critical account of current controversies and developments of these ideas. He usefully illustrates his account with contemporary examples, fully referenced, from the fields of literature, art, theatre and dance. Allen is always illucidating and thorough.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 24 October 2003
If anybody needs a quick introduction into the meanders of modern literary theory, this book is an essential starting point. Around the topic of intertextuality, the author reviews modern theoretical contributions from Bakhtin to the poststructuralists that range far beyond the field of literature. Intertextuality, after all, is a cultural not a literary phenomenon. The book is highly readable, even enjoyable at times, and this is a major praise for a theoretical textbook. The series is also affordable and neatly presented. I recommend it unreservedly.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 12 February 2006
Although it is advertised as being for undergraduate use, I have used this book with doctoral students, who have found it to be extremely useful. Very well written and comprehensive treatment, easy to understand and yet well detailed discussion of the critical nuances, from Kristeva onwards. Highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 30 May 2011
Having not read much literary theory since the late 80s, I was surprised to see that the big names haven't changed much in over twenty years. It's mostly still Barthes, Derrida, Bakhtin, Kristeva, Showalter, Bloom, and their bloc. Though some, like Kristeva and Bakhtin, from the evidence in this book, seem to have risen in importance, while there's a whole batch of post-colonialist theorists who I didn't know about before, and the author also presents us a chapter with three interesting structuralists called Genette, Riffaterre and Jenny. Riffaterre, for instance, is a terrific inventor of new jargon, and Genette offers us the hypotext, the paratext, the architext, the peritext, the metatext and the epitext (I may have missed a few), to add to the boring old intertext and hypertext. There's also a section at the end on the internet, and hypertext's potential for changing how we read (this book was published in 2000), with the author suggesting that we may become more like Barthes' and Kristeva's engaged reader-writers, given the possibilities that we now have (e.g. through this website) to respond to texts in previously unavailable ways. Considering the density of the subject-matter, this is a very readable book, and did make me feel I understood concepts like The Death of the Author, dialogism, 'misreading' and intertextuality itself far better than I used to; no mean feat, really.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Allen does a very good - if unenviable job - here in discussing the emergence and history of `intertextuality' as a term and practice. Situating it within the complex and contested currents of theory (semiotics, poststructuralism, postmodernism), he manages to keep his narrative coherent without succumbing to the kind of totalising and essentialising discourse that intertextuality, by its very nature, disrupts.

Allen guides us through selected works of Kristeva, Bakhtin, Barthes, Genette et al. and also relates intertextuality to feminist and postcolonialist theory. He ends with a useful glossary of key terms and a working bibliography.

This is one of the few theory handbooks that it's worth owning as it's the perfect reference and jumping-off point for further research. This is excellent for undergraduates, postgraduates who need a refresher, and anyone else wanting to get an insight into where theory is today (as of 2000).
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on 26 May 2013
I have rated this as 1 star specifically for the Kindle Edition. This is a first rate text on intertextuality and provides detailed analysis on how intertextual theory relates to new media (which is what I was looking for). However, I am using references to this text in a research paper and the publisher seems to have failed to provide page references for all locations (some are provided and some are not). As a result I am now frustratingly in the position (rather late in the day) of having to buy a hard copy in order to provide the correct academic references. Publishers really need to address this issue for quality reference texts such as this one. If you wish to refer to this text in academic papers I would recommend NOT downloading the digital version as you will end up paying for it twice.
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on 29 June 2013
An easy-to-read introduction to how intertextuality works. If you are comparing books, want to know how books, authors and readers are influenced, this is an essential text.
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on 18 January 2015
good condition
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on 19 November 2014
very pleased
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on 3 December 2014
Good
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