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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absorbing and informative read
I liked the way the book demonstrates DID from different multidisciplinary perspectives. It has helped me to clarify and understand clients problems as they present in my therapeutic work. This book is recommended!
Published on 5 Feb 2011 by Galatea

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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More disjointed than my mind
Firstly, I would say, the book says that it is good reading for therapists and professionals working with DID. I am not a professional; I have DID however I thought that since I am well educated and of reasonable intelligence, I would be able to understand the content. I was wrong! It doesn't matter how intelligent you are, if you havent studied psychology, there is a lot...
Published on 30 Dec 2011 by Candycanandco


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More disjointed than my mind, 30 Dec 2011
This review is from: Attachment, Trauma and Multiplicity: Working with Dissociative Identity Disorder (Paperback)
Firstly, I would say, the book says that it is good reading for therapists and professionals working with DID. I am not a professional; I have DID however I thought that since I am well educated and of reasonable intelligence, I would be able to understand the content. I was wrong! It doesn't matter how intelligent you are, if you havent studied psychology, there is a lot of material in the book that WILL NOT make any sense to you at all. It uses a lot of jargon and technical terms that no amount of brains will help you understand if you haven't already got the knowledge of psychological terms (and I don't mean a BASIC knowledge either). That is not however the fault of the authors as they don't advertise themselves as being a useful book for people with DID. I'm just putting that in as a warning. If you think you can handle it and don't know A LOT about psychology then you should probably add a psychology manual to your shopping basket as well. But in my opinion, if you have DID or want to know more about it and aren't a professional in the field, you should just buy a different book.

I did like the fact that the book seems to be evidence based. I have read other books on DID that were easier reading and really informative but had cited no evidence to back them up. I think a book that could have the writing style of other more manageable books but the evidence that this book quotes would be more useful to the inquisitive DID sufferer.

Now, despite not having a clue about some of the content, I did read the whole book (most pages four or five times over... very slowly) and was able to glean some useful information from it. Having said that I found that there was a variation in the readability between chapters. Each chapter is written by a different author and brings their insights on attachment, trauma and multiplicity to the book. Some chapters were difficult to manage because of the psychological content of the book (as I said before: not the fault of the book), however other chapters were just difficult to read because the writer used excessive complicated and I felt unneccessary vocubulary, which in my opinion is just done to try to sound knowledgeable but isn't helpful. Even if I had studied clinical psychology instead of the subjects I did, I would find this off-putting.

In addition, I felt the book was poorly edited. Some of the layout of material was mish mashed (chapter 3 for example, introduces a clinical case then skips back to treatment theory for trauma for a few pages before starting to talk about the clinical case later on). There were several spelling mistakes and errors where sentences did not make sense due to having an extra word or word missing. I feel that where this book is a second edition, the editors have cut and pasted bits and added in bits but didn't take enough time to check the spelling and grammar. Or maybe the person proof reading it was so overwhelmed by the wordiness and jargon that they couldn't tell the mistakes from the complicity. It doesn't take much to make sure the book doesn't contain errors before it's printed and this is one of the main reasons I haven't given it a high rating.

Another point I would like to make is that there seems to be a strong emphasis on 'ritual abuse' in the book. In some chapters I almost felt that the writer was of the opinion that ritual abuse is the only cause of DID. I did not really understand why there was so much emphasis and why some of the assumptions about things that have happened to people with DID were made. At one point (chapter 12) the author states that people with DID have suffered organised sexual abuse arranged by the father. Now, of course, this does happen, but it hasn't happened to everyone with DID and future editions of the book I feel should not make so many assumptions. It is important to talk about the causes of DID but I found myself feeling like an anomaly for not having suffered torture and endured satanic rituals as a child.

I questioned the helpfullness of the chapter called "Snow White and the Seven Diagnoses" where the author attempts to relate DID to the fairytale of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. To be honest I found it slightly offensive; as though the author was trying to romanticise the condition, but without really giving a good reason as to why it would be useful to do so. Plus, I found the descriptions confusing. The author states themselves: "It is not fashionable to cite Disney versions when applying fairy tales to clinical questions." I would say, she should have followed this fashion advice.

I also feel the chapters didn't really follow a set path. The book is more like a conglomerate of different professionals thoughts on attachment and trauma; each coming from a different perspective. This probably had its benefits but also meant there was some repetition and no 'beginning, middle and end' to the book. It is more like a lucky dip. You could read the chapters in any order and it wouldn't really matter. Maybe that's not a flaw, but I didn't like this element.

I have been very critical so I would just like to emphasize that a lot of my opinions may not be agreed with by others reading the book. The things I liked about it, was the actual information on attachment. Once I was able to decipher some of the chapters, I learnt a lot about what types of attachment are and how in families where abuse is taking place the child can be both seeking attachment and fearful of the care giver leading to disorganised attachment styles which then follow through to adulthood. I liked how this is related to the client-therapist relationship and I found it very informative on a personal level, for me with DID as a client in therapy. Therefore, if you have DID and are brave and brainy, I would say you will get something from the book if you buy it.

For any professionals, I would say you should read it. I would want my therapist to read the book, but be warned, you may agree that the layout, editing and some of the authors' writing styles make it more than light reading.

I hope this is useful!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Somewhat weird, 20 Feb 2012
By 
John Rowan (London England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Attachment, Trauma and Multiplicity: Working with Dissociative Identity Disorder (Paperback)
This is a book about the psychiatric condition known as Dissociative Identity Disorder. It is up to date and contains numerous first-person accounts of what this is like, as well as a full roster of experts to tell us what it all meant. But there is no discussion at all of the idea that we are all multiple, and that multiplicity is normal.
It is an extraordinarily varied book. The first chapter, by Phil Mollon, is all about Freud and the early days of psychoanalysis. It does not seem to me a particularly useful way of starting.
The next chapter, by Moskowitz, Corstens & Kent, is much better. It is entitled `What can auditory hallucinations tell us about the dissociative nature of personality?' It actually mentions the work of the Stones in Voice Dialogue, which indicates a degree of openness to non-psychoanalytic ideas not much found elsewhere in this book.
Then we get a highly coloured chapter by Sinason herself on `The verbal language of trauma and dissociation' which shows off her twin fascination with the extreme, and with wordplay. Luckily we have now lost her earlier fascination with ritual Satanic abuse, which was so remarkable a few years ago.
Chapter 4 is by Mary Sue Moore, all about children's art, which has some quite interesting material. But she, like all of the authors in this book, comes from a psychoanalytic background, and there is no awareness of any of the many other theories of multiplicity within the person, such as the dialogical self theory of Hubert Hermans, which is causing such a stir at the moment. This is also true of the next chapter, by John Morton, which presents a very restricted and oversimplified view of the dissociative brain. The sheer ignorance of the recent work comes out even more in the next chapter, by Margaret Wilkinson, which contains some weird statements, such as "Each baby, whatever their earliest experience, enters the world in an unassociated state of being.." which ignores all the work of Grof, Verny, Lake, Chamberlain and others who have studied foetal life and the birth process, and even ignores the striking research of the analyst Alessandra Piontelli using video recordings of twins in the womb.
The narrow psychoanalytic bias of this book comes out again in the chapter by Susie Orbach on body development, which starts off with the extraordinary statement that "We have little theory that discusses the development of self from clinical evidence." This ignores the huge corpus of work in body psychotherapy by people like Boadella, the bioenergetics work, the Continental bodywork network, which puts on big conferences, and so on. She goes into the theory of attachment, and ignores the idea that the four categories of adult attachment correspond very closely with the idea from Transactional Analysis that there are four basic existential positions, often labeled as the OK Corral.
Possibly the weirdest chapter is by Ellert Nijenhuis, which continues for 40 highly technical pages, largely based on the theory of Thomas Metzinger, a German philosopher of experience. But whereas Metzinger himself is clear and succinct, the author of this chapter is more wordy and pompous, and not easy to follow.
After the torment of Chapter 8, it is quite a relief to come to the final chapter, by Richard Chefetz and Philip Bromberg. I had not come across Chefetz before, but Bromberg has contributed many chapters to good books on consciousness and multiplicity. Much of this chapter is oriented around a particular case, and I felt that this was well done and quite moving in parts. But it is miles away from the narrow psychoanalytic view of Sinason and some of the other writers collected here.
So what are we to make of this? To me a lot of it seems like a quite ignorant, psychoanalytic mishmash. But there is also some good stuff here for the patient reader. It seems to me a prime example of schoolism - restricting oneself to one's own school even when others have more and better things to offer. This arena of multiplicity has been growing of late, not only through the efforts of Hubert Hermans and the Dialogical Self school, but also through Assimilation Theory, Schema Theory, Narrative Therapy and so forth, all of whom have made contributions noted in my own book `Personification' (2010).
John Rowan January 2012
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Spreading a harmful myth, 30 Jan 2014
This review is from: Attachment, Trauma and Multiplicity: Working with Dissociative Identity Disorder (Paperback)
This book consists of chapters written by a variety of therapists, who have several different slants on on the strange condition called Dissociative Identity Disorder.One thing they all have in common is an questioning belief that this condition results from severe childhood trauma. They disregard the widespread scepticism that surrounds thie concept of multiplicity and dissociation, which to many people is a consequence of intensive psychotherapy rather than anything that happened in the client's childhood. These authors also appear unconcerned at the known damaging effects of this therapy, which alienates its clients from their families,leaves them with many horrific memories which are demonstratively false. No reliable outcome studies have been undertaken for the various types of therapy described in this book, and no benefits have been established to outweigh its heavy cost. There is no science in this book, just a jumble of untested and misleading theories.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absorbing and informative read, 5 Feb 2011
This review is from: Attachment, Trauma and Multiplicity: Working with Dissociative Identity Disorder (Paperback)
I liked the way the book demonstrates DID from different multidisciplinary perspectives. It has helped me to clarify and understand clients problems as they present in my therapeutic work. This book is recommended!
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