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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent naval policy document but not someone for readers with a short attention span, 28 Jan 2013
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Geoffrey Till managed to produce a pretty comprehensive document on naval policy, which is certainly a helpful source for someone tasked with developing one for a specific country's navy. Having said that, it is also not a quick listing of the main points to consider, so a reader less interested in the historical development of the various approaches may feel frustrated with the pace of the book at times.

After defining the three types of naval forces, namely the pre-modern, modern and post-modern, he then launches into the activity spectrum of the latter two types, all the way from blue ocean naval dominion to protection of maritime ressources. Each point is derived from historical thinking / policy documents first and foremost, and then illustrated with practical examples from the last 500 or so years of naval history.

Having read the book, you will get a pretty comprehensive overview of the ideas of Mahan, Corbett, Gorshkov and smaller sections on a large number of other naval thinkers through the ages.

The penultimate chapter is then devoted to applying some of the ideas to the practical examples of some navies operating in Asia, specifically those of Japan, China, India and USN. This brings some of the ideas together but a more complete treatment of the subject would have been beneficial.

While one certainly sees the scholarship that went into the writing of this book - certainly not something a lesser author could manage - and the author manages a fairly fluent writing style, the book is still somewhat heavy going at times. Deriving every point from first principles is certainly academically laudable but does not do that much for the overall readability.

Having said that the book remains an excellent support for understanding and developing naval policy. If you are more interested in the actual platforms (i.e. ships, submarines, aircraft), you may be disappointed in what you get - those per se are not the focus of the book.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Feedback on Sea Power, 14 Mar 2013
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This review is from: Seapower: A Guide for the Twenty-First Century (Cass Series: Naval Policy and History) (Paperback)
Arrived very quickly, in time for my son to make good use of the information that is required before he starts his officer training in the Navy
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Seapower: A Guide for the Twenty-First Century (Cass Series: Naval Policy and History)
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