Customer Reviews

30
3.5 out of 5 stars
The Joy of Work?: Jobs, Happiness and You
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:£14.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
As a born worrier, recently moved in with my partner, arranging a wedding and waiting and preparing to apply for my current job, I was looking for as little help on the worrying front!

The daily exercises form a good framework to work through the process of worrying and as there were many that I found particularly useful, I will be using these in the future if times get more worrisome. This book is very good for this, as once you've worked through it once, you can then pick and choose which exercises suit you and your needs best!

I didn't do (out loud) the verbal (talking) exercises, but instead wrote about them. This was a personal choice as I find talking about worrying embarrassing, but it may work for others!!

Writing down worries is something I find very therapeutic , relaxing and generally relieves the worry in my head, so having structured exercises to focus this was really useful.

This (or any) book will not stop someone being a total worrier, but it helps to relieve the stress of worrying with its variety of techniques suggested.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This book is usefull in that it will reassure anyone in any line of work that dissatisfaction is widespread. Different levels of satisfaction are imagined as levels of vitamins in one's system: there is a point at which the RDA is overshot and the vitamin works against you. It is possible to be too 'happy'. The authors list obvious facts of life inside and away from the workplace, but gives clear viewpoints that anyone needing clarification of their problems will find beneficial. They highlight the 'Nine needed' aspects of what makes a job satisfying - the reader can think of their current predicament as they read, but perhaps it would be unwise to jump ship at the present time!

The writing is friendly and well balanced, using few meaningless statistics - which have nothing to do with real life! - and there are also many pointing observations about being unemployed. An interesting book to help you weigh up the pros and cons of your life at work
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 18 March 2011
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
A useful book if you are looking to evaluate or re-evaluate your work situation. If you are dissatisfied at work or interested in happiness - work research. However, for the casual reader it is not like a "freakonomics" read.

There are practical tips and quizzes, so if you are dissatisfied, it could help you. But the writing is not the easiest in places being some times on the academic side.

It does make the point that happiness is often relative (millionaires are generally no happier than non-millionaires as they are just as likely to compare themselves to billionaires - as non-millionaires to millionaires - and make themselves feel relatively poor!) and if you measure yourself against factors outside your control then happiness becomes somewhat outside your control.

More of a special interest book, but should be helpful to some.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
An easy book to like. Because it manages to be positive and encouraging without sounding corny.

Eg. you will not be asked to repeat "I LOVE my job" first thing every morning.
Rather, you'll read about the various influences on your experiences at work, establish how these influences affect you in your own situation and have courses of action suggested as to how you can improve things. Including leaving your job!

Enjoying life in general has some common influences to work and this is recognised in the book. In fact, there are many observations which could equally well be applied outside work.

I would recommend this book as I find it a pleasing read and a really useful guide which clearly explains the theories behind the practical suggestions.

[My Ref: Your comments are really affecting my job satisfaction! Jan 11]
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Ask anyone, say the authors Peter Warr and Guy Clapperton, are they happy at work, and they will "go a bit shruggy. They don't really know... after all they do the job, it pays the bills, what else is there? Others say sometimes they quite like their job but often they don't, so they're not really sure. Or maybe they're OK about it, but does that really make them happy?"

One worker is quoted as saying "Frankly I hate work. Of course I could say with equal truth that I love work; that it is a supremely interesting activity; that it is often fascinating; that I wish I didn't have to do it; that I wish I had a job at which I could earn a decent wage. That makes six subjective statements about work all of which are true to me." I'm sure many of us would sympathise with such a viewpoint.

Warr and Clapperton distil research down to a dozen main points which affect job happiness as follows:

- Personal influence
- Using your abilities
- Demands and goals
- Variety
- Clear requirements and outlook
- Social contacts

- Money
- Adequate physical setting
- A valued role
- Supportive supervision
- Good career outlook
- Fair treatment

These categories further subdivide so that the first six of them require a happy medium to be optimal (there can be too much of a good thing).

That's the academic side of it. But can anything be done to improve happiness at work? The authors perhaps weaken the case for this prospect with a couple of chapters conceding that firstly, happiness in work is related to happiness in life in general and a person's natural disposition, and secondly that happiness is also relative, measuring yourself against others and thus things outside your control. The book does conclude with a couple of chapters attempting to consider how work happiness can be improved, but it is essentially questionnaire-based around the twelve factors, and considering how important each is to you. This doesn't mean that any of them are easy to change though; it thus feels to me only really useful if you are considering a job or career change (or deciding whether you like your current job enough to not consider a change), and thus points to look for in new employment. And in the current economic climate, that's not a likely prospect for many of us.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
VINE VOICEon 6 May 2013
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This is an odd little book. 75% of it discusses the concept of happiness, both inside and outside of work, and it's only in the last two chapters that any practical advice as to how to increase happiness at work. Unfortunately, for an academic work, there are few references that do not originate from one of the author's previous works, and it is grating to note how many times this other work is mentioned. It is unlikely that someone picking this book up would be interested in buying yet another title to supplement the information.
The chapters that include quizzes and questionnaires are the most interesting, not because of what the answers 'mean' but because of the issues they raise. The Top Twelve features about the different aspects of happiness in a job list a number of concepts about happiness, focusing on those that affect work specifically, and describing the ways in which these features manifest.
Unfortunately, this book tries to cover happiness at work in such a generic wide-ranging way that a lot of it seems irrelevant to people who don't work in office-based environments. It also barely touches upon those who work in the home, or who have their own business (which is strange, as many of the examples used were of entrepreneurs).
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
What I really like about this book is that if faces the issues of work - not about making a persons life good outside it but on what happens at work. This is a different way of looking at things than most other self help books I have read. The stories and comments are good. The tables relevant and clear.
This book helps the reader see their work as important to everyone else and mostly themselves.
Good.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This is a good book, that will be helpful to many readers. It is a useful condensation of a much larger more scholarly work. It is packed full of useful descriptions and good ideas for how to enjoy work more. And it starts from the basics pointing out that although your job might have its frustrations, imagine how much you would miss them if you became redundant.

The book is reasonably written and contains a lot of information within it. If I have any criticism it is that the book feels that a lot has been crammed in, a feeling that is compounded by its small size and dense text with narrow margins. The book could have been more generously designed.

The book is a useful guide to the pros and cons of working, and good at showing workers how to get more out of their jobs in terms of enjoyment, reward and satisfaction. My friend Adrian Kenny describes a job as being a balance between satisfaction, salary and support. This book will help you get a better balance of these from your own work.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Work seems a joy when compared to this. The book itself doesn't even want you to read it, so dense is the typeface, so minutely spaced the lines of text. Migraine inducing. Saving paper perhaps? Maybe I should have looked for a Kindle version.

Anyway, much of this the usual guff about redefining goals and outlooks that seem to be identical to various seminars and programmes I've sat through at several companies. Sure, there are self-evaluating parts of the book that may enlighten you...but you're not going to get much in the of feedback regarding your answers so the usefulness is debatable.

If you really are unhappy at work you might find some tactics herein that will help. My problem has always been following through. I sometimes resolve to start again, with fresh eyes, fresh ears, a fresh heart. Then two months later I'm back where I started. It might just be me, but I think I'm not cut out for reinevention. If you are, then try it. You never know.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I'll admit I gave up long before the end of this book. So I guess what you could take from that is, it wasn't for me.

But on the plus side, it is not a 'happy-clappy' 'work is good' book. In fact it is pretty sensibly written, setting out why it is we work and stating the less-than-startling fact that we all have to do stuff we don't like. But if you are wanting a guide to helping you think clearly about your workplace and whether you should change jobs (in today's dismal economic environment that seems like a luxury) then this is a good example of the genre.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
The Psychology Book
The Psychology Book by Nigel Benson (Hardcover - 1 Feb. 2012)
£11.89

Psychology at Work
Psychology at Work by Peter Warr (Paperback - 28 Mar. 2002)
£13.59

Work, Happiness, and Unhappiness
Work, Happiness, and Unhappiness by Peter Warr (Paperback - 2 May 2007)
£43.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)
  -  
Experience Unlimited Possibilities. Apply Today for a Career at Aflac