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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Understanding MCT
I thought that MCT was just another name for CBT, but wanted to find out more about the approach. This book makes it very clear how MCT is distinct from a theoretical and clinical perspective. It provides many useful clinical examples and clinicians will find this a great introduction to working with clients from this new perspective.
Published on 18 April 2009 by louise M

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1 of 28 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Oh Please!
Do we need an entire book to tell us not to ruminate about or troubles? - CBT is not all its cracked up to be, and to that end MCBT inserts a little more substance, but rather than attempt to highjack an uninteresting model, why not invent something better altogether?
Published on 3 Feb 2010 by sanyata


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Understanding MCT, 18 April 2009
This review is from: Metacognitive Therapy: Distinctive Features (CBT Distinctive Features) (Paperback)
I thought that MCT was just another name for CBT, but wanted to find out more about the approach. This book makes it very clear how MCT is distinct from a theoretical and clinical perspective. It provides many useful clinical examples and clinicians will find this a great introduction to working with clients from this new perspective.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent addition to the literature on Metacognitive Therapy (MCT), 24 April 2012
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This review is from: Metacognitive Therapy: Distinctive Features (CBT Distinctive Features) (Paperback)
Metacognitive therapy is one of the most important modern cognitive/behavioural therapies, without doubt, especially in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Adrian Wells has written an very comprehensive manual on metacognitive therapy (MCT) Metacognitive Therapy for Anxiety and Depression. However, this Distinctive Features series dictates a set format for the book that perhaps helps the authors here to provide similar information in a different manner, with new examples, etc. I found this very helpful as it clarifies the general approach and broadens the range of examples. For instance, there are a few more examples of MCT applied to social phobia in this book, an application not covered in much detail elsewhere. This book is perhaps also slightly more readable than Wells' main manual, and more concise. (It fits nicely in my jacket pocket for reading on the train!) I'd therefore recommend that anyone interested in MCT might want to read this book first and then the one mentioned above. MCT arguably offers a simpler and more consistent approach, in some ways, than traditional CBT. It's also accumulating evidence as potentially being slightly briefer and more effective than traditional CBT. MCT has shown particular promise as a treatment for OCD and GAD. Aaron T. Beck has now explicitly assimilated aspects of MCT into his revised cognitive therapy approach for GAD, and perhaps also in his revisions of the generic cognitive model of anxiety. In addition to the anxiety disorders, MCT has also shown promise as a more focused approach to the treatment of clinical depression than traditional cognitive therapy has offered, by targeting the key process of rumination. If I remember rightly, this book particularly has examples of OCD and GAD throughout and a chapter is dedicated to a longer example of MCT applied to PTSD. Wells has also desribed a transdiagnostic or "universal" MCT conceptualisation model which provides a basis for applying the approach to other, related problems, perhaps including certain subclinical or comorbid cases, etc. What's lacking here are some of the forms and diagrams that are central to the approach but these are available in the manual above.

Donald Robertson
Author of The Philosophy of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy
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1 of 28 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Oh Please!, 3 Feb 2010
This review is from: Metacognitive Therapy: Distinctive Features (CBT Distinctive Features) (Paperback)
Do we need an entire book to tell us not to ruminate about or troubles? - CBT is not all its cracked up to be, and to that end MCBT inserts a little more substance, but rather than attempt to highjack an uninteresting model, why not invent something better altogether?
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