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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Every history student needs to read this
A short, pithy and very learned text. Read when sitting beside Google or a v. good dictionary as there is often a need (for me at any rate) to reference some terms.

Cannot rate highly enough. Superb and is on my re-read list immediately.
Published 9 months ago by D. Shadbolt

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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Important challenge sadly over-cooked
Jenkins post-modern critique of the discipline of historiography is interesting, but a bit over the top. His approach speaks of narratives constructing ways of seeing the past. This is the condition of perceiving history - we see the past through the 'thought style' of the present. Fair enough, but Jenkins fails to distinguish between history written by historians and...
Published on 15 Dec 2009 by Mr. Bde Wall


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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Important challenge sadly over-cooked, 15 Dec 2009
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This review is from: Re-thinking History (Routledge Classics) (Paperback)
Jenkins post-modern critique of the discipline of historiography is interesting, but a bit over the top. His approach speaks of narratives constructing ways of seeing the past. This is the condition of perceiving history - we see the past through the 'thought style' of the present. Fair enough, but Jenkins fails to distinguish between history written by historians and personal histories - is our own relations to people in the past a more accurate description of real events? What about historians writing in their own age about first hand events? This isn't very clear. He was trying to break with the dominant historical discourse, to allow a bit more room for historical exploration, which is fair enough, but he does go a bit far, abandoning the notion that their could be more or less adequate approaches to the study of history. I, however, do agree with his distinction between the past and history, and I thought the use of Steiner, Eagleton and Barthes work was good, thinkers I feel are perhaps more subtle and complex than Jenkins, at least in this text.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Every history student needs to read this, 30 Sep 2013
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D. Shadbolt (Oxford UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Re-thinking History (Routledge Classics) (Paperback)
A short, pithy and very learned text. Read when sitting beside Google or a v. good dictionary as there is often a need (for me at any rate) to reference some terms.

Cannot rate highly enough. Superb and is on my re-read list immediately.
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4.0 out of 5 stars This is a well written, though short, explanation upon the methodological motivation of historical writers and theorists., 22 May 2014
This review is from: Re-thinking History (Routledge Classics) (Paperback)
An engaging explanation of the subject of political history and its writing. All communication including that we use ourselves everyday is through the wearing of various masks for different situations that which is situated for the political requirements of the time. We are all political animals, all creatures included, and as such we engage in compromise, cooperation and conflict. When are masks slip or are perceived to have slipped by others we become the subject of political histories. As Keith Jenkins says these are all subjective interpretations. All any of us are trying to do is survive. Although we live in an unstable world I do not believe in the Postmodern idea that it is increasingly fragmented. The world has always been fragmented. It is just its type, variance and extent that have been constantly changing across the ages. What I do agree with is the difference between perception and reality which can only be achieved through test or Science. Though such experiment has to meet with ethical standards. This book widened the reflection on the subject of my thought to new and interesting areas.However I would highly recommend this read for anyone interested in history writing, history theory, the history of ideas, politics, philosophy, psychology and sociology.
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17 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fresh look at Historiography, 23 April 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Re-thinking History (Paperback)
I picked up this book having read EH Carr, and with an open mind, and was not disappointed. Jenkins really hits the nail on the head with this insightful book that prompts one to take a fresh look at some of today's most controversial historical problems. It is a very engaging, readable book that has been so useful in my personal study of history, particularly in the attention paid to the relevance and irrelevance of historical sources and facts. I thoroughly recommend this to anyone studying History!
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9 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A book that will change the way you look at everything, 19 April 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Re-thinking History (Paperback)
Rethinking History is an essential guide to the debates concerning the world we are living in, relevant not just for historians but for everyone. It raises interesting questions concerning our education system, politics and our perception of "bias" and "truth" when it comes to the past and our attitudes towards it. In some places the book leaves a great deal to be desired in its grammar and sentence structure, but get beyond the bad use of the English language, and this book does in fact have some very important things to say. Believe me, it will change the way you look at everything!
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16 of 27 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fatuous, overly-critical and irritatingly smug, 10 Oct 2003
This review is from: Re-thinking History (Routledge Classics) (Paperback)
Having read this book as part of a series of books for a Uni course, compared to the likes of Marc Bloch, Karl Marx and others, I couldn't help wondering why, if he knows so much about the problems with historical writing, Jenkins has never bothered to write a history book, rather than a historical theory book. Others have criticised the traditional methodology of historians but put their own ideas into practice to demonstrate what they mean. Jenkins seems to have neither the imagination nor the ability to write history, so instead he has turned his attention to criticising it. Having said this, he has some interesting ideas, but they must be compared to the writing of Richard Evans (In Defence of History), Bloch and as many others as possible, which will rather show up the flaws in his reasoning.
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Re-thinking History (Routledge Classics)
Re-thinking History (Routledge Classics) by Keith Jenkins (Paperback - 6 Feb 2003)
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