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64 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As easy as wrestling a hologram!
At its heart, David Bohm awe-inspiring book explores a deceptively simple and [I think] very old idea: everything in the universe that we can observe, measure, describe, and come to understand is connected, even if we cannot observe, measure, describe and come to understand that connection (Bohm's "implicate order"). It's not for the faint hearted. You'll be confronted...
Published on 21 May 2004 by Peter FYFE

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars then this is an easy read. If not
If you understand the idea of "implicate Order", then this is an easy read. If not, Start with Rupert Sheldrake, Lyall Watson and Carl Sagan, then make a comment on this book. :)
Published 9 months ago by Nimrod


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64 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As easy as wrestling a hologram!, 21 May 2004
By 
Peter FYFE (Erskineville, Sydney, Australia) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Wholeness and the Implicate Order (Routledge Classics) (Paperback)
At its heart, David Bohm awe-inspiring book explores a deceptively simple and [I think] very old idea: everything in the universe that we can observe, measure, describe, and come to understand is connected, even if we cannot observe, measure, describe and come to understand that connection (Bohm's "implicate order"). It's not for the faint hearted. You'll be confronted with a devastatingly beautiful philosophical insight that completely undermines our post-"enlightenment" western tendency to divide, conquer, fragment and isolate everything we attempt to understand. You may need to skip the mathematical chunks and do some background reading into Quantum physics to survive the rigours of the argument. You'll probably get frustrated at Bohm's winsome ability to be mathematician and physicist one minute and philosopher and mystic the next. But if you hang in there, you'll find yourself returning again and again to contemplate this profound contribution to occidental thinking, as I have.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Deserves to be better known, 6 Jan. 2008
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This review is from: Wholeness and the Implicate Order (Routledge Classics) (Paperback)
This book deserves to be better known - it should be as popular as the "Tao of Physics". The only reason I don't give it 5 stars is that there are sections that don't live up to the claim to be written without technical jargon. But don't let that put you off as it mainly concerns just one chapter and, while the rest of the book may require a little intellectual exercise, it is well worth the effort so that you can share Bohm's view of the universe as a holomovement. He even resolves the problem of non-locality and thus reconciles the differences between quantum theory and relativity. Bohm has taken science forward, it is just a pity that so few have followed him.
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47 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Physics for the 21st Century, 15 Jan. 2002
This is a superbly written exposition of intriguing ideas on the nature of reality. I have not studied Physics but was able to understand the key concepts used to convey Bohm's theory. Bohm's key idea is that reality is a totality in movement and can not be completely grasped by fragmented and static thought. Rather we must allow our own understanding to move and change with what we observe to stay closer to reality. Deep, enlightening and insightful stuff!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars All is Flux, 5 Dec. 2012
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This review is from: Wholeness and the Implicate Order (Routledge Classics) (Paperback)
The first three chapters of this book,use philosophy and etymology to reposition the fragmentary belief systems prevalent in modern physics and further incorporate them as sub-sets in the larger framework of a wholly inclusive higher dimensional reality,of which our experiential existence is but a projection.
The middle section of the book is a mathematical treatment of an attempt to prove that it is possible to introduce new concepts into Quantum theory,that while still giving the same results,support the idea that certain hidden variables are responsible for as yet unexplained experimental phenomena,such as the paradox of Einstein,Rosen Podolsky(spooky action at a distance) and electron interference patterns (two slit experiment).This section is particularly heavy going for the general reader,although the explanations between equations do elucidate what is generally implied.
Finally the last chapters round up the previous lines of thought and use the example of the Hologram and its enfoldment of information,to explain this theory of wholeness and how consciousness and matter can be interrelated and our explicate reality is born out of an implicate reality.
This is,not to my mind,a book aimed at a general readership as is implied in some other reviews.I couldn't help thinking that large sections could have been more clearly written and more examples and allegory used particularly in the first half.It is technical in many places and quite verbose due to the academic standards of its author.However if you are a reader of popular science then it shouldn't present any difficulties although "The Holographic Universe" by Michael Talbot is a less rigorous treatment and extension of the same theory that has more appeal to the general reader.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a classic series of seminal essays, 14 May 2013
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Angus Jenkinson "angusjenkinson" (Cambridgeshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Wholeness and the Implicate Order (Routledge Classics) (Paperback)
Bohm's thinking on wholeness had great significance for my work in thinking about the integrated organisation and integrated marketing. Bohm is acknowledged as one of the major physicists of the 20th century, but his thinking led to a position that challenged the conventions of the time. In an attempt to resolve the divide between relativity theory and quantum theory, he postulated an underlying deeper order that united the two (the implicate order). I'm not convinced that this will win through in the end, at least not in the form that he outlines it, but in the process of doing this he outlines and discovers the fundamental of wholeness that underpins and permeates all reality. He also comes to an awareness of the importance of thought itself and the means by which the kinds of thoughts that we have determine the kind of reality that we have, so that the fragmented nature of science, and human knowledge more generally, as taught leads to a fragmented view of the universe. Moreover as long as we give prominence to the analytical mode this will always be the case. Other forms of thinking, for example analogic, circular and Zen give rise to quite different modes of knowing. Moreover the observation of thinking itself as a dynamic flow leads to a quite other understanding of the nature of consciousness, life and the universe. This led him to his work on dialogue and has parallels with Whitehead's Process and Reality and Heidegger
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hard Going, but Worth It, 4 Feb. 2013
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This review is from: Wholeness and the Implicate Order (Routledge Classics) (Paperback)
This is an intense book and not at all an easy read, many of the concepts being difficult ones to grasp and being articulated in great depth! Slow and thoughtful perseverance and ponderance of the text does make this a fascinating read, however.

The book contains a great deal of essential philosophical wisdom and some thought provoking science, crucially being a strong reminder that our scientific theories are the progeny of our ideas about reality, rather than a representation of reality itself. There is so much we don't know, but it's fascinating finding this out.

However, there is also much that we (humanity) are learning. As Bohm points out, one of the key things we are starting to learn is not to look so much to fragmentation for answers, but rather to also adopt a holistic perspective, viewing the relationships between `objects' as key to understanding, rather than focusing strongly upon the perceived structure of the objects themselves.

I am familiar with a certain amount of quantum physics, having done some studying, so this helps with comprehension of the concepts discussed. I'm not sure how a complete novice would cope with the quantum theory (well, actually, I am fairly sure!), but if you have already done some reading on this subject, most of the more technical parts can be understood!

Overall, a very fine piece of work.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What a read!, 8 Sept. 2011
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What a read! Both in terms of difficulty (even forgetting the maths!) and the concepts discussed.
Mr Bohm's name is deservedly uttered in the same breath as the likes of Newton, Einstein et al. and I'm not surprised that his ideas have brought about a paradigm shift in scientific thinking. The subject he tackles in this book is a big one: the universe and our place in it. This is not an easy read as he deals with abstract concepts like thought, knowledge, intelligence etc., and you may find yourself reading and re-reading chapter after chapter, but persevere....this book has answers to big questions!
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29 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bridges the chasm between science and spirituality, 6 July 2001
I read this book eight years ago but its impact is still with me to this day. David Bohm writes with great authority and clarity. He uses language, which by its very nature, is dualistic, to describe something which has no opposite. In doing so, he has enabled me, and any other reader who so chooses, to transcend the tiresome Aristotelian dialectic which seems to be so necessary to preserve the world-view that time and space are real!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Krishnamurti meets modern science, 5 Nov. 2011
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This review is from: Wholeness and the Implicate Order (Routledge Classics) (Paperback)
David Bohm's "Wholeness and the Implicate Order" is a curious book. Modern quantum physics meet Henri Bergson, Advaita Vedanta and presumably Jiddu Krishnamurti. Some sections of the book are so technical than I don't understand them. Others sound like new agey flim flam. Bohm was a world-renown scientist, but he also had a longstanding friendship with Krishnamurti, self-defrocked Theosophist and spiritual teacher in the Hindu-Buddhist vein. What Bohm calls "the implicate order" or the "holomovement", a Hindu would presumably call Brahman. In Bohm's more Bergsonian version, the holomovement is constantly evolving, implying that somehow humanity can evolve further, too. (Note the Theosophical antecedents for this idea.)

To Bohm, both matter, life and consciousness arise from the holomovement, which is itself neither. Curiously, Bohm's speculations are on some points more "rational" than official quantum physics (the Copenhagen interpretation), since he attempts to explain various bizarre quantum phenomena by deriving them from a higher order of reality, which is open to scientific exploration, at least up to a certain point. The seemingly "occult" behaviour of atoms and particles in standard quantum physics could thus be explained as caused by the implicate order. Mystery solved. On the web, I found some "sceptics", read atheists or agnostics, who are interested in Bohm precisely for this reason, since they consider the Copenhagen interpretation to be down-right irrational flim flam. It's therefore ironic that Bohm himself was looking for Brahman!

Bohm's metaphysics could be regarded as pantheist, panpsychist or perhaps panentheist. "Our" reality is an abstraction or holographic projection of the implicate order. It looks dualist or fragmented, but on a deeper level, we are all part of a seamless Whole. Bohm speculates that the implicate order might itself be a sub-set of an even deeper order of which we can say nothing. Of course, in Hinduism such a statement implies mysticism, and Bohm often uses terms I associate with meditation (right attention, etc). By expanding our consciousness, we could overcome our fragmentation and create a peaceful world community in harmony with Nature. Or so Bohm believes. These themes are only hinted, however, since the book is supposed to be a scientific treatise.

When I read "Wholeness and the Implicate Order", I was struck by the fact that my own opinions have been roughly similar to those of Bohm for as long as I can remember - and yet, I regarded myself as a materialist until a few years ago! My "materialism" was in reality an implicit (implicate?) evolutionary panpsychism. Amen. However, I can also sense some problems with Bohm's position. How is "abstraction" and fragmentation possible at all, if reality is a seamless whole? The Eastern philosophies can't explain this jump from monism to pluralism either, except by suggesting that Maya is indeed inscrutable. Presumably, we'll all stop asking awkward questions once we get the mystical Insight.

Still, it's interesting that Bohm believed that at least part of the non-materialist, implicate order can be proven by modern science.
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5.0 out of 5 stars OVERWHELMINGLY FASCINATING, 1 Dec. 2013
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Mrs. Judith Lugg "Judith Lugg" (Wolverhampton, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Wholeness and the Implicate Order (Routledge Classics) (Paperback)
As others have said, this is not an easy read - I am not a physicist, nevertheless, I WAS able to 'get my head around' the concepts being presented here.

I feel that this book should be read by as many people as possible - the concepts contained therein are infinitely fascinating and point to a different way of understanding that which now seems to be un-intelligible because of the very way in which we approach it. Our current way of thinking that everything is fragmented and separate leads to great misconceptions and if only we can grasp the fact that utterly everything is connected we shall have come a long way along the road to a deeper knowledge of all that is.

In other words, we could come to see the great wholeness that is everything.
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Wholeness and the Implicate Order (Routledge Classics)
Wholeness and the Implicate Order (Routledge Classics) by David Bohm (Paperback - 4 July 2002)
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