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5.0 out of 5 stars The Poems Of Gerard Manley Hopkins - A Review by Barry Van-Asten
In many ways, Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889) is a rather neglected poet, but to anyone who cares to explore the life and work of this somewhat `peculiar' man, there are indeed many riches to be found! Hopkins, was received into the Roman Catholic Church in 1866 and was resolved on a life as a Jesuit Priest (he was ordained in 1877). He was a professor of rhetoric at...
Published 21 months ago by Mr. B. P. Van-asten

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Kindle version
I give it 2 not 3 stars since 2and a half is not an option. It's more "just about acceptable" than "OK".

No spacing between Titles and end of previous poems. Best read in landscape on the kindle. Individual Poems cannot be navigated to from contents. One for fans of Hopkins only I would suggest.

However everything seems to be here. If it was revised...
Published on 18 April 2012 by Chris


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Kindle version, 18 April 2012
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I give it 2 not 3 stars since 2and a half is not an option. It's more "just about acceptable" than "OK".

No spacing between Titles and end of previous poems. Best read in landscape on the kindle. Individual Poems cannot be navigated to from contents. One for fans of Hopkins only I would suggest.

However everything seems to be here. If it was revised according to the suggestions it would be worth 5 stars.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Poems Of Gerard Manley Hopkins - A Review by Barry Van-Asten, 16 July 2012
By 
Mr. B. P. Van-asten (London, England.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
In many ways, Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889) is a rather neglected poet, but to anyone who cares to explore the life and work of this somewhat `peculiar' man, there are indeed many riches to be found! Hopkins, was received into the Roman Catholic Church in 1866 and was resolved on a life as a Jesuit Priest (he was ordained in 1877). He was a professor of rhetoric at Roehampton in 1873-4 before studying theology at St. Bueno's in North Wales (1874-7) where he became entranced by the spiritual teachings and disciplines of St. Ignatius Loyola.
His poems are known for their poetic devices of `inscape' and `instress', words of Hopkin's invention; the former is the spiritual `essence' of a thing, and the latter is the `energy' which flows from that thing. Hopkins also uses a technique known a `sprung rhythm' which attempts to mirror speech rhythms using verse which is based on the number of stresses (not the feet) in a line. Among his complete poems in `The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins' published in 1918, are: `The wreck of the Deutschland' (1876), `The Windhover' (1877) and `Pied Beauty' (1877). But it is his `dark poems', or what is termed the `terrible sonnets' for which he is most remembered. They were written at a time of deep depression in the summer of 1885, while as a professor of Greek and Latin at University College, Dublin; poems such as: `To seem the stranger', `I wake and feel', `Patience, hard thing', `Carrion Comfort', `No worst, there is none' and `My own heart' have a tragic sadness about them which leads one to suggest Hopkins may even have contemplated suicide during that dark time of his life! We know he was infatuated by a young poet named Digby Dolben (1848-1867), and that his love was unrequited - `I wake and feel the fell of dark, not day. / What hours, O what black hours we have spent / This night! What sights you, heart, saw; ways you went! / And more must, in yet longer light's delay. / -- With witness I speak this. But where I say / Hours I mean years, mean life. And my lament / Is cries countless, cries like dead letters sent / To dearest him that lives alas! away.'
I count myself fortunate to have walked in the footsteps of such a wondrous soul! A marvel of misunderstood genius!
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23 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reflections on the work of Gerard Manley Hopkins, 20 Dec 1999
By A Customer
It is often thought that Hopkins represents the first truly modern thinker to come out of the turgid atmosphere of late Victorian poetry. The dynamism and energy of his writing fly from the page in tones which even his close friend Robert Bridges referred to as "obscure" and "peculiar". However, those looking to this Jesuit priest for modern themes will be disappointed. In his approach to God, and the general representation of the logos, we find a very different Hopkins. There is none of the assured atheism of Hardy here, but rather a lost and lonely believer. For Hopkins, God is not dead - rather He is hiding. This poet does not find its parallels with the writers of the 1920s and 1930s as Cecil Day Lewis suggests, but rather his writing is similar to that of the metaphysical poets of the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods. Donne would feel closer to Hopkins than Auden ever could. When Donne writes "Thou hast made me", it is in similar tones to Hopkins desires to find his God two centuries afterwards. "The Windhover" (I met this morning morning's minion...) with its ecstatic praise of God, dedicated to Jesus, is not the work of a doubtful Christi
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