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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clear and comprehensive, 9 Mar 2011
This review is from: Routledge Philosophy GuideBook to Kant and the Critique of Pure Reason (Routledge Philosophy Guidebooks) (Paperback)
A clear and thorough guidebook/companion to the CPR, perfectly accessible to undergraduates and patient general readers. The book follows the structure of the CPR closely, so is perfect for side-by-side reading. The more dense and perplexing sections are clearly explained, often using Gardner's own and adapted examples. The reader is also introduced to some of the interpretative issues surrounding the text, and Gardner generally offers compelling replies to Kant's critics (where possible); the book is also good on historical context. This is another good addition to the Routledge Guidebook series that stands as the best 'side-by-side' companion for the newcomer to Kant's most daunting work. Its particular merit is in being accessible and introductory, but also comprehensive and detailed - the more technical parts of the book, and the web of interpretative issues are not skipped over but patiently and clearly dealt with.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best book on Kant, 11 Sep 2002
By 
Dr. Matthew Broome "matthewbroome" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Routledge Philosophy GuideBook to Kant and the Critique of Pure Reason (Routledge Philosophy Guidebooks) (Paperback)
Wonderfully clear and detailed exposition of Kant's critique of pure reason as well as situating the text in the concerns of Kant's predecessors and successors. If you are a novice, try Scruton's brief intro to Kant but when you get more into it then this is the book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you don't have time to read the Critique, read this instead.., 10 Aug 2012
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This review is from: Routledge Philosophy GuideBook to Kant and the Critique of Pure Reason (Routledge Philosophy Guidebooks) (Paperback)
I approached my study of the CPR by reading a few shorter summaries first, then reading this, then reading the Critique itself. In an ideal world you should always read philosophy in the source text, and most of the time this is the only way you will ever truly understand it. However in this instance, as I was reading the CPR, I very often felt that I wasn't getting very much more out of it than I had already got from the Routledge Guide, which is a testament both to the quality of the explanation in this book and to the rather dry and somewhat overcomplexity of the source text. This book really is a fantastic explanation that solidified the concepts for me in a way which none of the previous summaries I had read had even come close to.

However, there were several parts where this wasn't the case. The Transcendental Deduction in the Analytic (both the most important and the most complicated part of the book) I only really GOT from the source text. The reason for this is also an interesting critique of the Routledge guide: the occasional problem is that the guide often presents an analysis of the concepts of the Critique within the context of the fact that the book can either be interpreted from the Analytic tradition or the Continental/Idealist tradition. These two interpretations of the work are very very different, and if you buy into one the other will confuse the hell out of you. Personally I would say that I sit very firmly in the Continental camp in the way that I would read this, in particular I tend to read it very much as proto-phenomenolgy of the Heideggerian variety. Therefore, the description of the deduction in the guide, because it is sensitive to both interpretations, was actually very confusing; and it was only when I read the actual book that I truly understood the transcendental unity of apperception in my own way.

However, I am not saying this is a fault of the book; simply that you need to bear this in mind if you intend to read this instead of the source text.

One last note for Kindle readers: the book is not tagged very well in the Kindle edition, for example the contents page does not include the actual names of the chapters. Otherwise it's OK though
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential, 10 April 2011
By 
J. Higgins (Cambridgeshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Routledge Philosophy GuideBook to Kant and the Critique of Pure Reason (Routledge Philosophy Guidebooks) (Paperback)
Kant's Critique is hardly the easiest philosophical text you'll come across. I'd even go as far to say it is one of the hardest based on the ideas Kant is presenting and the style of his writing. This run through of the Critique is certainly the best to come out in recent times and is also the most comprehensible, but it does not make the task of understanding Kant any easier. It will take several reads of both the Critique and this analysis to fully understand what has been said, but this is normal when reading Kant (or any philosopher!). Overall this text is very useful if not essential when studying the Critique and the issues surrounding it.
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