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45 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A humble masterpiece
This book by Carl Rogers on client-centered therapy may lack the drama, the force or the cleverness associated with some books on other forms of psychotherapy. What it doesn't seem to lack is a quiet wisdom that flowed from Rogers' many years of experience and sensitivity to his patients.

Despite some redundancy, being a collection of papers and presentations...
Published on 15 Oct 2007 by calmly

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71 of 83 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Are the core condtions truly 'enough'?
I am currently trying to read this book in preparation for a counselling diploma beginning next month. Having already read Rogers's book, "A Way of Being", I thought I would enjoy "On Becoming a Person", however I am struggling to be engaged with it.

I think the problem is that I feel as though I am just covering ground that he has already discussed in A WAY OF...
Published on 30 Aug 2006 by Brida


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45 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A humble masterpiece, 15 Oct 2007
This review is from: On Becoming a Person (Paperback)
This book by Carl Rogers on client-centered therapy may lack the drama, the force or the cleverness associated with some books on other forms of psychotherapy. What it doesn't seem to lack is a quiet wisdom that flowed from Rogers' many years of experience and sensitivity to his patients.

Despite some redundancy, being a collection of papers and presentations from Rogers over many years, "On Becoming A Person":

1) presents a branch of psychotherapy distinct from psychoanalysis and learning theories as well as from behaviorism, focused more on basically well people growing than on helping disturbed people get better.

2) is rooted in Roger's positive view of human nature as basically good and constructive, as he discovered in encounters with his patients. Roger's emphasis on empathic understanding, on not imposing theoretical speculations about the clients state of mind and on avoiding forceful interference would seem to avoid some of the abuses associated with some other psychotherapies.

3) presents ideas about the helping relationship that Rogers extended from psychotherapy into other areas such as education. Rogers's nondirective approach suggested to him the possibility of a progressive education free of examinations, of grades, of conclusions, and even of teachers.

4) despite its "fuzziness", Rogers does present some experimental evidence in favor of client-centered therapy as compared to those based on learning theory and behaviorism.

5) Rogers' shows appreciation of the growing power of the behavioral sciences but expresses concern less this science, like other sciences, becomes manipulated by politicians to the detriment of people. He basically wonders, if a culture is to be designed, as Skinner had suggested, what safeguards there are on the designer.

Rogers may seem too rosy and to be cherry-picking his results. The kind of measurements he presents, such as a psychological test measuring "changes in the self" based on self reporting may seem too fuzzy. How long it takes, compared to other available approaches, to get effective change seems not to have been a primary consideration for Rogers and may explain the rise of more recent approaches like Cognitive Therapy and Constructive Living. As a lay person, I respect the humane treatment Rogers recommended toward those entering psychotherapy as clients.

A major contribution by Rogers seems to be his recognition that his clients were not objects to do things to but rather fellow people whose experience he could share in.
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179 of 191 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Easy to understand where Rogers was coming from with book., 16 Sep 2001
By A Customer
This was one of the first books I read when doing my course work in counselling skills training. It was easy to read, and understand what Carl Rogers was trying to get over about the need for the Core Conditions in the building of a therapeutic relationship. I felt it was more of an autobiography than a training manual, as reading it gave a small insight into how Roger's told of his own personal growth and how everyone can live life to their own maximum potential if they want to.
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113 of 122 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's view of Psychotherapy, 5 Sep 2003
Carl Roger's is one of the few theorists who you feel you really get to know through his writing, this book is no exception and helped me so much when I was training to become a counsellor. Roger's writes with ease and this book is essential for those trying to understand the importance of the Core Conditions to the therapeutic relationship. My copy is tattered now, read often and borrowed by many!
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94 of 103 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic in psychotherapy, 29 July 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: On Becoming a Person (Paperback)
I've been told that this book is a classic among books about psychotherapy and I've found that, indeed, it is an interesting read for anyone interested in the inner world of humans - not only for the experts.
One of the main points of the author is that, in any personal relations, be it with patients, pupils, colleagues, friends or partners, the route to personal growth (for all sides) requires empathy, acceptance and thruthfullness. Trying to force "mental" change in a patient or, say, ones maritial partner does not provide lasting improvement, but providing a solid relationship helps the other on his way to finding his self. In other words, by becoming a friend, the councelor can help the patient become the person he is.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worthwhile, 8 April 2014
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Is Carl Rogers boring? Well he is rather persistent and takes time to make a point. I have found that the Rogers I have read gave me something useful every time so I am glad to class Rogers as a 'useful author'. I don't think the reader with some kind of interest (including the self-interest of a patient such as myself) will miss out spending some time on Rogers work.

What interested me most - the revelation of what client-centred therapy is supposed to be- as compared to the service actually delivered by the Mental Health Service - the phrase 'client centred approach' is often bandied about by medical and untrained staff. The truth is that the procedures and ideas outlined by their originator rarely put in appearance in the reality of an actual hospital setting.

I wanted to hear the story from the horses mouth and was not disappointed by what I have read.

A useful book that gives the reader something to work on.
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71 of 83 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Are the core condtions truly 'enough'?, 30 Aug 2006
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Brida "izumi" (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: On Becoming a Person (Paperback)
I am currently trying to read this book in preparation for a counselling diploma beginning next month. Having already read Rogers's book, "A Way of Being", I thought I would enjoy "On Becoming a Person", however I am struggling to be engaged with it.

I think the problem is that I feel as though I am just covering ground that he has already discussed in A WAY OF BEING. While I agree that for a relationship to be helpful there has to be the core conditions of empathy, unconditional positive regard and congruence, I feel as though I need more than just this if I am to develop as a counsellor. I feel as though you need to have some knowledge of how your clients can help their situations - people come to counselling because they want to improve aspects of their life, and I am not sure that just the core conditions are enough.

While I shall try and continue with ON BECOMING A PERSON for my course, I have already started looking for alternative books whcih may offer more. One that has caught my eye is Egan's SKILLED HELPER - a book which suposedly takes Rogers's core conditions as a starting point, but then develops ways of actually helping clients meet goals which would be helpful to them.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Helped me decide the person centred approach was not for me, 29 Mar 2009
This review is from: On Becoming a Person (Paperback)
An interesting read, especially when the flavour of the private man seeps through, as it often does. Rogers guru-like status has been bolstered by this book but it left me wondering 'wheres the beef?'.

Being 'nice' has it's place but is also a good way of dancing round the heart of the matter without ever engaging with it.

That said, I would recommend it to people who favour an uncovering approach as it conveys much of the value of attending to the lived moment-by-moment relationship - never a bad thing to be reminded of but not sufficient on it's own, whatever the assertions.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars if you love carl rogers, 8 Nov 2013
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This review is from: On Becoming a Person (Paperback)
it is hard for me to get going with this, it does help if you love the person centred Therapy
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Person centred, 12 July 2013
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This review is from: On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of Psychotherapy (Paperback)
It's a good book that describes the change from self concept to becoming an actualising individual. However found it hard going in places.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars On becoming a person, 27 Sep 2010
This review is from: On Becoming a Person (Paperback)
Excellent book, highly relevant for anyone interested in person centred counselling. Easy to read and understand.
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On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of Psychotherapy
On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of Psychotherapy by Carl R. Rogers (Paperback - 31 Oct 1995)
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