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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite book when I was a kid
What if the letters A through Z aren't enough for you? Looking for adventure beyond the end of the alphabet? Let Dr. Seuss take you on a guided tour of the letters "On Beyond Zebra." Sure, when I was in elementary school some 35 years ago I loved Yertle the turtle and Horton the elephant, but this book was my favorite. For some reason it seems to be harder to...
Published on 26 Nov. 1997

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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Seuss's Structure Slips!
Doctor Seuss has taught us all to enjoy flawless humor, good fantasy, and fantastic illustrations. So it was a great surprise to me when this book didn't carry off its premise smoothly.
The book is a satire on those alphabet books that all children trudge through to learn their ABCs. A is for apple, and so forth, is the predictable format. Here, Dr. Seuss adjusts the...
Published on 12 May 2004 by Donald Mitchell


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite book when I was a kid, 26 Nov. 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: On beyond Zebra! (Classic Seuss) (Hardcover)
What if the letters A through Z aren't enough for you? Looking for adventure beyond the end of the alphabet? Let Dr. Seuss take you on a guided tour of the letters "On Beyond Zebra." Sure, when I was in elementary school some 35 years ago I loved Yertle the turtle and Horton the elephant, but this book was my favorite. For some reason it seems to be harder to find than Seuss' other books -- except at Amazon.com, of course!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great, 7 April 2014
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As usual Dr Seuss is a great read. Also the condition of the book was very good. ex Library book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 23 Jan. 2015
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This review is from: On Beyond Zebra (Hardcover)
Absolutely satisfied with both the quality of the book and the fast service. Thanks.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Seuss's Structure Slips!, 12 May 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: On beyond Zebra! (Classic Seuss) (Hardcover)
Doctor Seuss has taught us all to enjoy flawless humor, good fantasy, and fantastic illustrations. So it was a great surprise to me when this book didn't carry off its premise smoothly.
The book is a satire on those alphabet books that all children trudge through to learn their ABCs. A is for apple, and so forth, is the predictable format. Here, Dr. Seuss adjusts the format to be about animals. "A is for Ape. And B is for Bear."
The story opens with Conrad Cornelius o'Donald o'Dell announcing, "I know all the twenty-six letters like that . . . ."
Our narrator disagrees. "But not me." "In the places I go there are things that I see that I never could spell if I stopped with the Z." "My alphabet starts where your alphabet ends."
Now, here's the problem. Although the book has many interesting and new letters and creatures, each letter is actually just a combination of the first twenty-six. For example, YUZZ is the first new letter, and is illustrated by the tall and hairy Yuzz-a-ma-Tuzz. Although a sort of symbol is established to represent the letter, Dr. Seuss doesn't use the symbol in the rhyme. He always refers to the letter as YUZZ.
Dr. Seuss could have used his new letter symbol wherever it fit into the rhyme, or he could have made up letters that were not combinations of the first twenty-six letters. Either approach would have worked.
I suspect that the structure in the book can either consciously or subconsciously confuse a new reader about what a letter is, what a syllable is, and what a word is. It's all quite unnecessary.
If Dr. Seuss had used his new symbols to form new words, that would have been a nice basis for helping English readers learn how to move back and forth between English and languages with different methods of representation, like Russian, Chinese, Japanese, and Hebrew. So, the book's a bit of a missed opportunity in this direction, too.
My suggestion is that if you want to have fun with the story anyway (because the creatures are pretty swell), simply point out that Dr. Seuss made a little goof and clarify the point about what a letter is in whatever way makes the most sense to you for where your child is in reading readiness.
The animals and their names are terrific, and you will enjoy them and their illustrations. Here's a partial list: Wumbus ("my high-spouting whale who lives on a hill"), Umbus ("a sort of a cow" with 98 or 99 "faucets" for giving milk), Humpf-Humpf-a-Dumpfer, Miss Fuddle-dee-Duddle (a bird with the longest tail), Glikker (blue and small, eats seeds, and juggles cinammon seeds), Nutch (lives in small caves that are in short supply), Sneedle (a mos-keedle with a sharp hum-dinger stinger on its head), Quandery (a red creature on shells in the ocean that worries a lot), Thnadner (the big one has a small shadow and the small one a big shadow), Spazzin (a camel-like creature with amazing horns for carrying baggage), Floob-Boober-Bab-Boober-Bah (fish you can use like stepping stones to get across the top of water as they bob on the surface), and Zatz-It (like a tall giraffe).
The story concludes with young o'Dell getting the spirit of the narrator.
"This is really great stuff!
And I guess the old alphabet
ISN'T enough!"
o'Dell draws a new letter:
" . . . what do you think that
we should call this one, anyhow?"
Enjoy imagination, and honor it . . . wherever it may be found!
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Seuss's Structure Slips!, 30 July 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Doctor Seuss has taught us all to enjoy flawless humor, good fantasy, and fantastic illustrations. So it was a great surprise to me when this book didn't carry off its premise smoothly.
The book is a satire on those alphabet books that all children trudge through to learn their ABCs. A is for apple, and so forth, is the predictable format. Here, Dr. Seuss adjusts the format to be about animals.
The story opens with Conrad Cornelius o'Donald o'Dell announcing that he knows the whole alphabet.
Our narrator disagrees. "In the places I go there are things that I see that I never could spell if I stopped with the Z." His alphabet continues on after Z.
Now, here's the problem. Although the book has many interesting and new letters and creatures, each letter is actually just a combination of the first twenty-six. For example, YUZZ is the first new letter, and is illustrated by the tall and hairy Yuzz-a-ma-Tuzz. Although a sort of symbol is established to represent the letter, Dr. Seuss doesn't use the symbol in the rhyme. He always refers to the letter as YUZZ.
Dr. Seuss could have used his new letter symbol wherever it fit into the rhyme, or he could have made up letters that were not combinations of the first twenty-six letters. Either approach would have worked.
I suspect that the structure in the book can either consciously or subconsciously confuse a new reader about what a letter is, what a syllable is, and what a word is. It's all quite unnecessary.
If Dr. Seuss had used his new symbols to form new words, that would have been a nice basis for helping English readers learn how to move back and forth between English and languages with different methods of representation, like Russian, Chinese, Japanese, and Hebrew. So, the book's a bit of a missed opportunity in this direction, too.
My suggestion is that if you want to have fun with the story anyway (because the creatures are pretty swell), simply point out that Dr. Seuss made a little goof and clarify the point about what a letter is in whatever way makes the most sense to you for where your child is in reading readiness.
The animals and their names are terrific, and you will enjoy them and their illustrations. Here's a partial list: Wumbus (a whale who lives on a hill), Umbus (a kind of cow with 98 or 99 outlets for giving milk), Humpf-Humpf-a-Dumpfer, Miss Fuddle-dee-Duddle (a bird with the longest tail), Glikker (blue and small, eats seeds, and juggles cinammon seeds), Nutch (lives in small caves that are in short supply), Sneedle (a mos-keedle with a sharp hum-dinger stinger on its head), Quandery (a red creature on shells in the ocean that worries a lot), Thnadner (the big one has a small shadow and the small one a big shadow), Spazzin (a camel-like creature with amazing horns for carrying baggage), Floob-Boober-Bab-Boober-Bah (fish you can use like stepping stones to get across the top of water as they bob on the surface), and Zatz-It (like a tall giraffe).
The story concludes with young o'Dell getting the spirit of the narrator and agreeing that the 26 letter alphabet isn't enough.
o'Dell then draws a new letter and asks what it should be called.
Enjoy imagination, and honor it . . . wherever it may be found!
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On beyond Zebra! (Classic Seuss)
On beyond Zebra! (Classic Seuss) by Dr Suess (Hardcover - 31 Dec. 1998)
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