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5.0 out of 5 stars The Master and his Emissary
It's terrifying to think that Arthur Schopenhauer nearly fell out of history; to die alone, unknown, his writings to vanish, deleted forever, along with his name. How many other genius' have vanished like this? It makes you wonder.

Only by fluke was Arthur Schopenhauer discovered; 8 years before his death. The wilderness years is the reason why Schopenhauer...
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45 of 61 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This is not a Nietzsche book!
Think about this, if you want to read "The Will To Power": This book is simply a compilation of unused Nietzsche writings done by the philosopher's sister Elisabeth Nietzsche and former intimus Peter Gast. They wanted to transform him into a nationalist, militarist and racist to get more publicity for him. So they falsificated many of his aphorisms he did...
Published on 4 Sept. 1999


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5.0 out of 5 stars The Master and his Emissary, 29 Mar. 2015
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This review is from: The Will to Power: In Science, Nature, Society and Art (Vintage) (Paperback)
It's terrifying to think that Arthur Schopenhauer nearly fell out of history; to die alone, unknown, his writings to vanish, deleted forever, along with his name. How many other genius' have vanished like this? It makes you wonder.

Only by fluke was Arthur Schopenhauer discovered; 8 years before his death. The wilderness years is the reason why Schopenhauer didn't notice the many contradictions in his system, like arguing that the Will was a Hell but the voice of the Will was beauty personified, and, so, being all alone, his prose is a madness to the eternal; for Arthur Schopenhauer, the plug was but a few years away. Saying this, if he really believed his own system, then getting washed out of history was the ultimate denial of the will. So his late fame dragged him back into hell.

If the dark ocean of oblivion was to be his port of no-call, then Einstein would need to find another favourite philosopher, Freud would never had succeeded in fooling the world and there would be no Friedrich Nietzsche and no Triumph of the Will.

Bitter with the universe, Arthur Schopenhauer was convinced he would never be discovered because of the dead weight of `the professors', the eternal chorus of the `foolers and the fooled', those wretched Hegel mongers and the sheer idiocy of the crowd, an idiocy the Gods themselves rolled their eyeballs at, an idiocy that always flattens the individual genius

Schopenhauer does have a point in hating academics and stupid people. Though some academics are keeping his head out of the dark ocean, so he'll probably be smiling at this irony but, alas, he won't be impressed with the exponential growth of the crowd.

However, Schopenhauer is full of contradictions. His pessimism is alien to Indian soil and his woe to life is contradicted by his going to nice hotels and eating excellent lunch.

Another mistake is that he didn't recognise the link between Kant and the East. Kant speaks in inadequate words, which hide a mighty and scarcely apprehended intuition. Kant's system recognises that the world is phenomena, or maya, or, to use the cutting edge, a hologram. In India, this hologram, also known as Brahman or satchitananda, is consciousness, consciousness isn't inside you, rather, you are inside It. Peel away the categories and it is there. So when the body rots, the in-dweller in you still exists. Even Schopenhauer hints at this, then leaves it there.

For Schopenhauer, Kant's insight, the world being phenomena, gets boxed into brain phenomena, the much heralded 'epiphenomena' of the 'neuromaniacs' (Raymond Talis). This is why Schopenhauer writes that the Will is blind and that what we call consciousness is a parasite inside your skull! Therefore, Schopenhauer's theory of consciousness is mere materialism. However, in other places Schopenhauer claims to understand and to hate materialism! Materialism is a giant with clay feet, but Schopenhauer didn't know the East so he missed the atman doctrine.

There are many contradictions in Arthur Schopenhauer. A believer is strict determinism who is angered at the choice of others. He would even visit lunatic asylums to see the crazy people exhibiting odd behaviour.

Arthur Schopenhauer, master of Friedrich Nietzsche, would visit lunatic asylums to study individuals who has lost their ego. Schopenhauer found enlightened buddha's, outstanding genius' and other malcontent's languishing in the mad house.

Friedrich Nietzsche, his disciple, will eventually confirm the masters thesis.
Fancying himself a fierce opponent of his once master, Friedrich Nietzsche eventually succumbed to madness. Schopenhauer was therefore proved correct in writing that genius' resided not in universities, but in mad houses. Nietzsche indeed went mad, thus proving Schopenhauer was correct.

This new translation signals the Kings return.

C.G. Jung says that where Nietzsche was constantly on the boil, like a true genius, Arthur Schopenhauer was sometimes seen babbling silently to himself, like he's chewing over something profound. The locals would sneak behind his ear, only to hear the philosopher moaning about taxes.

I read somewhere that C.G. Jung feared going to Rome. Why was the psychiatrist afraid of going to Rome? Because Rome is just the symbol.

Jung had created a philosophy around his mighty mind, and that philosophy was afraid of being shattered, falling into ruination.

Thinkers create such vast, cosmic systems, and all those systems are now in ruins. The fear is that going to Rome means going to the ruins of the great systems that the past has created.

Faced with the eons, we think, 'What about your small system'? 'What about this small corner I've cleaned and decorated'? 'What about my philosophy'?

Look at Rome now? Great philosophies have tumbled down and gone to dust: go to Rome, see what has happened! Go to Athens, see what has happened! Where are the schools of Aristotle and Plato? All have disappeared into dust. The greatest systems in the end come to dust; all thoughts finally prove to be useless, because thought is just a man-created thing.

No system will last.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Diamonds in a Hay Stack, 13 Aug. 2010
By 
Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles "FIST" (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Will to Power: In Science, Nature, Society and Art (Vintage) (Paperback)
Not to be read in a straight sitting because this is compiled from notes. It is desirable to read his other books first as this is an anthology of ideas scrambled together by his sister. After his death she assembled his texts to assist in her greater cause.

Hidden within the haystack are rubies, emeralds, sapphires and diamonds, its just you have to sift. Fred couched his brilliance within shrouds of misanthropy and misogyny; a resentment against those with vital signs of life.

In his wake however he shredded the crass versions of Christianity, scientific rationalism, communism, anti Jewish sentiment, German sensibility, British myopia, the sacred cows of philosophy, whilst celebrating art, music wine and all forms of exuberance.

He never practiced what he imagined a full life would be. He died a protracted illness where he suffered a form of dementia. This is often attributed to syphilis and used by his enemies to chastise him with their version of morality. Fred made many enemies with his thoughts as he destroyed the sacred cows of herd values.

In the Will to Power he is kind to Christ but severe with Christians who have deliberately misinterpreted his beliefs. He rails against the middle classes and their destruction of taste, value/emotions wiping out those who they perceive as inferior and those who are deemed superior. He takes on money and greed in usurping art and creation. He paints a picture of the superman as beyond existing values but also constrained with them but making the challenge against thought bondage. Instead of nihilism and iconoclasm he posits an alternative view. He championed emotional knowledge over all forms as the supreme arbiter.

Alternatively he hated women and saw them as inferior, wanted a hierarchy of humanity based on a caste system. He looked up to tyrants and distrusted any form of democracy as it would allow the ordinary people to have the same say as the extraordinary. Although he distrusted German values this was only because they had veered from his sense of artistic production. He wanted to reinstate them even more firmly.

Often mistakenly perceived as a precursor of National Socialist belief, Nietzsche pronounced the eternal return, belief in instincts over rationalism, the celebration of art. A right wing anarchistic radical, the destroyer of false idols, his lance penetrates into the 21stC but beware of the poisonous tip because it will burn you up inside once it pierces.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading for anyone interested in Nietzsche., 10 Aug. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Will to Power: In Science, Nature, Society and Art (Vintage) (Paperback)
While the structure of the book is not Nietzsche's own, that should not detract from what is an essential collection of Nietzsche's otherwise unpublished work. Best read in conjunction with Nietzsche's other work, the Will to Power provides valuable additions to the ideas Nietzche presents elsewhere, i.e. eternal recurrence, will to power. Taken in this context, it is essential in trying to understand all of Nietzsche's thought.
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Most Unusual Puzzle, 27 Mar. 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: The Will to Power: In Science, Nature, Society and Art (Vintage) (Paperback)
To understand Nietzsche's philosophy one has to have a very alert mind. One has to keep the pieces of the puzzle in the mind's eye at all times. However, with The Will To Power, one may not ever solve the puzzle. From raw Power to Eternal Recurrence, Nietzsche's aphorisms take one throughout his inner universe. A universe that does not have Ariadne's thread to lead us back to some hoped for beginning. Nevertheless, the sheer potence of his emotional impetus, provides one with the building blocks towards his cherished Superman. It is the reader's job, therefore, to use these blocks, and build the bridge himself--an awesome task--which will liberate him from the bonds of anachronisms that are rampant in our "civilized" and "modern" society.
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45 of 61 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This is not a Nietzsche book!, 4 Sept. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Will to Power: In Science, Nature, Society and Art (Vintage) (Paperback)
Think about this, if you want to read "The Will To Power": This book is simply a compilation of unused Nietzsche writings done by the philosopher's sister Elisabeth Nietzsche and former intimus Peter Gast. They wanted to transform him into a nationalist, militarist and racist to get more publicity for him. So they falsificated many of his aphorisms he did during 1886 to 1888. This book and ONLY this book made it possible for Nazis to abuse him, the anti-nationalist, the philosemetic and anti-biologist.- Be careful with this book. I agree, it is sad that Nietzsche didn't leave a real "master work", so there is only one solution: Read ALL his books, starting with "The Birth Of Tragedy", finishing with "Ecce Homo". So you can get all the changes and the whole development in his philosophy. So all together, all his books summa sumaris are his "master work"!
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23 of 32 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A glorious pile of rubble!, 13 April 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Will to Power: In Science, Nature, Society and Art (Vintage) (Paperback)
The Will To Power was the title for a book which Nietzsche considered but never followed up. The book itself is a grotesque patchwork of Nietzsche's notes, observations or considerations awaiting refinement and incomplete thoughts cobbled together by his sister. The book has little or no coherent structure and should be avoided by those with an interest in the works which Nietzsche himself published or wished to publish. If the book has value, then it lies solely in the raw, VERY raw materials of Nietzsche's philosophy. If books like "Beyond Good And Evil" and "Twilight Of The Idols" could be compared to palaces or majestic skyscrapers, then "The Will To Power", would be sand, cement and a pile of bricks. Naturally, it is one hell of a pile of rubble! No lover of Nietzsche would wish to be denied access to his fascinating trains of thought, his incisive aggression and his kaliedoscope of perspectives but, viewed along side his published works, it falls short of his consistent lucid brilliance. Blame his sister's autonomic ignorance. Nietzsche cannot be blamed for this posthomously-wrought travesty.
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Utterly essential., 14 Dec. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Will to Power: In Science, Nature, Society and Art (Vintage) (Paperback)
Much derided and contains a great deal that could be deemed 'unacceptable'. However it also contains passages and fragments that must rank amongst the most powerful and persuasive philosophy in the Western, or indeed any canon.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Life is Will to Power, 3 Dec. 2010
By 
Luc REYNAERT (Beernem, Belgium) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Will to Power: In Science, Nature, Society and Art (Vintage) (Paperback)
In a furious tirade, Nietzsche shouts his utter disgust with the way of the world at the end of the 19th century. Its inhabitants are a herd of cowards, nihilists, socialists, l'art pour l'art artists, ignorant scientists and (dominated by) Christian moralists. `Civilization' should return to the Greek world, but before Plato (!), the great viaduct of corruption of philosophy by morality.

Christianity
The Christian Church invented the holy lie: a God who punishes and rewards in afterlife. Therefore, it had to create the (immortality of the) soul, the equality of the souls before God and psychological counterfeiting: sin, redemption, salvation. Truth is identical with the teachings of the priests. Its morality denies the `noble' nature of man, his egoism, responsibility, splendid animality and the instincts that delight in war and conquest.

Philosophy, science, socialism
He abhors the vulgarity of J. S. Mill and his `niaiserie anglaise': `Do not unto others what you would not have them to unto you.'
Darwin is `complète bÍtise'. He is mad about science, which made man loose his central place in the universe: `Since Copernicus man has been rolling from the centre toward X.'
Science is preparing a sovereign ignorance, a seduction by `numbers and logic', by `laws'. The atom is a subjective fiction.
The gospel of `we are all equal' is an insult of the `free spirit', of privilege, egoism and dominion. The `suffrage universel' equals the dominion of inferior men. He is opposed to parliamentary government and the press, because they are the means by which the herd animal becomes master.

Art
Art should be the great means of making life possible, the great seduction to life, the great stimulant of life. It is the redemption of those who see the terrifying and questionable noble character of existence and who want to live it.

The Will to Power, his world, his policies
The inner will of the real, noble man is the Will to Power, an insatiable desire to manifest power: `the mature man has, above all, weapons: he attacks.'(!)
The maintenance of the military State is the last means of maintaining the great tradition of the superiority of the strong type.
Marriage should be in the old aristocratic sense a question of breeding a race, a class of rulers, a class of `overmen'.
His world is `a monster of energy', a Dionysian world of the eternally self-creating and self-destroying `beyond good and evil'.

Evaluation
It is evident that major parts of Nietzsche's `moral rage' are totally wrong or unacceptable. His scientific vision is `pure and bad fiction'. His anti-democratic theories are an insult of humanity. He turns his `overmen' into `cold, calculating' breeders in order to dominate the `inferior' herd.
His world is a permanent bloody battlefield, a full blast decimating carnage among the `noble' warriors.

This book (with an excellent index) is not a good introduction to Nietzsche's work. It is composed of short comments, aphorisms, sometimes loosely connected sentences or paragraphs with a lot of repetitions and without a global plan. Better books are `Genealogy of Morals' or `Twilight of the Idols'.

Only for Nietzsche fans.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thanks, 13 Feb. 2013
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This review is from: The Will to Power: In Science, Nature, Society and Art (Vintage) (Paperback)
Was buying this as a gift - it was easy to find and exactly what I wanted! Thank you for it!
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The Will to Power: In Science, Nature, Society and Art (Vintage)
The Will to Power: In Science, Nature, Society and Art (Vintage) by Friedrich Nietzsche (Paperback - 28 Jun. 1973)
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