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1.0 out of 5 stars HALF-WIRED, 29 Aug. 2013
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This is a disappointing book on an interesting and important subject. One might have assumed (most did) that the internet would vastly enhance the store of global knowledge. How could it not create a worldwide public of those - there are many of us - who wish to be informed and can't think of an unjoined up, uncosmopolitan world. In reality internet users tend to use the medium in order to shire up their prejudices when they are not communicating with school friends. The consequences of mass public ignorance are a rich subject, but Zuckerman doesn't really ever face up to them. He ran a website from Cambridge Mass., that assembled blogs from all over the world. It didn't take off but Zuckerman thinks that such efforts are probably the answer. He doesn't approve of 'mainstream media', and he may be =right in suggesting that the old outlets have had their day. But is solutions are, for the most part, feeble; and the book is spoilt by poor, hasty writing. I'm sure that Zuckerman's heart is in the right place, but I don't feel we'll become educated cosmopolitans by reading books such as these. It would be good, too, to feel the new media seers had any regard for the the notion that truth is inseparable from good writing, and that cliches get us nowhere. I wish, though, that someone will come up with some real solutions. Must the internet - the greatest invention since the printing press - necessarily result in vicious, moronic controversy and consciously willed ignorance. I want someone to tell me that things can be better. Maybe Ethan can do that - he could try writing another book on the subject.
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3.0 out of 5 stars The Jury is still out!, 6 Nov. 2014
This review is from: Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection (Hardcover)
Explains why the technological ability to communicate does not necessarily lead to increased human connection. And we need to consider how technology appears to be disconnecting ourselves from the rest of the world. Full of interesting – and important – issues, but pity not more statistical evidence to support the arguments.
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Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection
Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection by Ethan Zuckerman (Hardcover - 12 July 2013)
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