Customer Reviews


 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a future baseball classic?
If you love the underdog, you will love the story of the Oakland Athletics from the last few years. I enjoyed this book a great deal, racing through it in a couple of days. Lewis has done a great job of showing just why the Oakland Athletics have been competing with the New York Yankees the past few years. The revealing chapters on Oakland's draft strategies and approach...
Published on 29 July 2003 by A.D.M.

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars Super boring
I dont find anything extra-ordinary about this book. It is very plain and boring and nowhere near a business book.
Its a book for baseball fans or people who have a good knowledge of the game. I do not recommend it to anyone who doesnt know about the game or hate it.
Published 4 months ago by Neelima Dahiya


‹ Previous | 1 2 310 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Read, another Lewis Classic, 29 May 2009
By 
A. I. Mackenzie "alimack" (Glasgow, Scotland.) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game (Hardcover)
Michael Lewis seems to have cornered a new patch of ground where sport meets economic analysis. That doesn't sound too promising as a subject for a book but this is a read in one sitting kind of book.

The basic thesis is that the baseball old guard mis-value systematically certain attributes in their players. They tend to test athletic basics and ignore a rich seam of statistical evidence that would allow a better valuation of players. Billy Beane of the Oakland 'A's is a poor man in a rich man's game, to compensate he uses statistics to substantially outperform expectations. In other words he looks for mis-priced players and exploits them to get his team into the World series.

Lewis manages to humanise this potentially dry stuff with acute character analyses of both Beane and the players, and some of the stories really get under your skin and are often really funny.

The writing is excellent and even if you have no interest in baseball, this is a book worth reading especially if you like 'Liar's Poker: Two Cities, True Greed(Coronet Books): Playing the Money Markets' or 'The New New Thing: How Some Man You've Never Heard of Just Changed Your Life'.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars MONEYBALL, 6 Oct. 2013
By 
Jet Lagged - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This book deals with the real life story of baseball player and manager Billy Beane.

Though I have no interest in baseball (I have only a hazy idea of the rules) - that is not the case with this book. I have read most of the author's books - beginning with his famous "Liar's Poker" one.

I also bought the CD version of this book, narrated by Lewis himself, and found it fascinating.

Billy Beane is a guy who many would say got a raw deal in life. After showing so much promise as a junior, it all went pear-shaped. Later in life he adopts an entirely new mathematical system for picking out promising baseball players. The system, born out of sheer financial necessity, is a new metric for spotting potential talent.

At first blush it seems a strange kind of thing for Lewis to be writing about. But this true story really grows on you.
It's a very interesting and thought provoking book. You don't have to have any prior knowledge of basketball to appreciate it. Neither do you need any knowledge of statistics.

The book was later made into a good movie starring Brad Pitt as Billy Beane himself.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No interest in Baseball - Catch 22, 26 Dec. 2010
By 
Mr. William Oxley "oxenblocks" (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
I have no interest in baseball but I have read and enjoyed previous books by Michael Lewis.

By page 22 I was hooked.

Once you start reading and get into the story you just can not put the nook down. I did, just long enough to write this review and return to finish the rest of the book. (Chapter 4 goes in depth into James the statistical writer and could be skipped without losing the thread of the story, as his importance is summarised in the first page of Chapter 5).

You do not have to know much about baseball - just think of rounders where you have somebody throwing the ball (pitcher) at a person with a bat (batsman/hitter). A batsman who hits a run that allows him to run around all 4 bases in one go, has hit a home run.

This is an interesting and gripping story of David and Goliath, or Blackpool in the Premiership (a self imposed maximum salary of £10,000 per week when others in the league are on anything up to £200,000 per week). This is how the underdog can win in a team sport heaped in tradition and run by ex-players who thrive on the tradition.

Read it and enjoy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moneyball: A truly valuable investment, 16 Nov. 2010
As a current sport scientist completing a MSc at University, I was recommended this book at a recent seminar by the head of the USOC (United States Olympic Committee) who was touring Britain and stated that he just had to read this book once a year.

From my perspective as someone who knows nothing about Baseball the book not only led me by the hand through the World of the Oakland A's and how they changed the game of Baseball through Science and Statistics but at the same time was not dull or boring as associated with books that review science but quite humerous. I loved this book and was not able to put it down once I started reading and I definitely plan to re-read it in the not to distant future.

The book is on many levels and would be easily read by anyone with any level of knowledge of science or baseball.

Although an interest in either sport, science or real world scenarios is probably beneficial when choosing to read this book. I would suggest that this book should be read by everyone at least once in their lifetime
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Book, 18 Mar. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If you like economics, finance, sport or statistics; this is the book for you.

Expertly written and gripping from the start, Moneyball opens you up to how stats can be effectively used in sport. I knew nothing about baseball but still found the book easy to follow and logical, and the story of the Oakland A's and Billy Beane is both enthralling and fascinating.

Easy to read; and so good I missed my train stop reading it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb book (better if you understand baseball however), 13 May 2007
By 
Mr. M. R. Wassell (Norfolk, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This was a great read; fascinating and thought provoking about professional baseball. It's great to see how a team has overcome a lack of financial clout to be able to still compete and to use educated statisticians rather than ex-players who go on hunches and their experience (that they believe to be a global one).

If you don't understand the game however, some of it may pass you by!

Very recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Baseball/Business Book for Non Baseball/Business Fans, 4 May 2005
By 
A. Ross (Washington, DC) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Lewis, who previously wrote some of the best books on Wall Street's go-go '80s (Liar's Poker) and Silicon Valley's go-go '90s (The New New Thing), here turns his attention to professional baseball. Now, I should preface this by saying that I used to love baseball and these days it doesn't interest me much at all. There was a time when I was a total stats geek, I bought all the Bill James abstracts, played tabletop games, etc., but a combination of playing in college and the escalating money completely turned me off to the game. I knew this was supposed to be a good book but had no intention of reading it until Nick Hornby's rave review in his column in The Believer. I figured if one of my favorite British novelists liked the book, there must be something to it. I picked it up and within ten pages I was totally hooked.
The basis for the book is the question of how the Oakland A's, one of baseball's poorest teams as measured by payroll, managed to win so many games in the first few years of the new millennium. Lewis's potentially boring answer revolves around inefficiencies in the market for players, but he weaves this story around the A's General Manager, Billy Beane. Now, if you have some axe to grind with Beane, you might as well not read the book, 'cause Lewis tends to be rather fawning in many places. Still, Beane's own background and mediocre career form the perfect framework upon which to build this story about evaluating baseball talent. Beane was a hugely athletic, "can't miss" prospect, who turned down a joint football/baseball scholarship from Stanford to sign with the New York Mets out of high school. His pro career turned out to be utterly undistinguished, and this disconnect is what drove him to seek new methods of scouting and evaluating baseball talent. It also helped matters that the A's new owners refused to spend any excess money, and demanded that the team be treated as a business. Beane jettisoned conventional scouting wisdom (and to a certain extent, methods), to focus on statistical indicators not widely followed inside baseball. Here, the book takes a detour into the realm of "sabremetrics" (the statistical analysis of baseball), and various attempts to arrive at more meaningful ways to calculating a player's offensive value.
The result of developing a criteria of player valuation that was radically at odds with the prevailing wisdom of the market was that Beane was able to get the players he liked for very cheap. The rest of the book is devoted to detailing this process. Chapter 5 is probably the best, detailing how the A's orchestrated the 2002 amateur draft so that they got an inordinate amount of players they coveted for below market value. Chapters 6 and 7 discuss the loss of their three star players after the 2001 season and how managed to compensate for this. To show the Beane methodology in action during the season, the reader is taken inside several trades and roster moves. This includes a chapter on the mid-season trade for relief pitcher Ricardo Rincon, bracketed by chapters detailing Beane's pursuit of certain players who were not considered major-league material (Scott Hatteberg and Chad Bradford). The book ends on a valedictory note, as the A's set a record by winning 20 games in a row and other teams start to buy in to their methods.
It should be noted that the book is far from perfect. Lewis has an unfortunately tendency for repetition when it comes to important points and themes, hammering them home, again and again. And although he does point out many of Beane's logical inconsistencies and emotional flaws, Lewis does often come across as more of an enamored fan than a strict journalist. Some critics feel that the A's success detailed in the book was based on several star players obtained the old-fashioned way, thus disproving the whole premise. However, it has to be understood that the practices detailed in the book can't really be proven to work one way or another for another decade or so. Still the insights into challenging conventional thinking and searching for alternative data or data patterns will likely appeal to readers of Lewis' other works and are applicable far beyond baseball. And while the jury is still out, several other teams have since hired general managers with the same basic philosophy as Beane. Ultimately, it's an interesting story, and one that Lewis tells very well -- even for non baseball fans.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Moneyball, 23 Dec. 2010
By 
PS "PS" (nr Milton Keynes, England) - See all my reviews
I enjoyed reading Moneyball, a straigt forward account of the use of staistics in player selection. To the non-baseball reader, the terminology is alien, and Micheal Lewis could have done more to explain 'walks' and 'bunt' etc.
This will appeal to the sports fan interested in an underdog team punching above their financial weight, albeit with virtualy no play-off success. Liverpool FC fans may get a glimpse of what is to come, as John Henry, their new owener, is a student of the concepts explained in this book.
I think Micheal Lewis is a huge fan of Billy Beane the man, and possibly overstates the use of stats as the reason behind the Oakland A's success'. Billy Beane comes across a a true wheeler-dealer, maybe the Barry Fry of Baseball (Barry Fry is an ex Peterborough Football Club Manager and Chairman, who's reputation for hireing and firing footballers was staggering)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The power of thinking differently, 21 Feb. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Other than the great insider view of the politics and power struggle of a Major League baseball franchise, the intriguing human interest story of the rise/fall/rise of Billy Beane, and the drama of the Oakland A's 2002 draft & season - the main reason this gets a 5 from me is the lesson it teaches of the power of thinking differently. What an inspiration it is to see people with nothing more than the desire to question the accepted truths and the ability to approach a subject from a different perspective. To this end Moneyball is an analogy for all the freethinkers out there and the impact they can have. If you've seen the film, don't think you've read the book - whilst the film is thoroughly enjoyable, it's still not a patch on the book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous Read!!, 3 Jun. 2008
By 
Mr. K. Mcgreskin (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I think all the other reviews say enough so I'll try to keep this short and simple. Even speaking from the perspective of a baseball illiterate limey, I must say that I found this book very very interesting indeed.... and most enjoyable. This was the first book of Michael Lewis' that I read and I have subsequently went on to read a number (not all) of his other works..... all of which have been equally as good. If you are interested in sports and/or the area athlete/player recruitment then this book will more than pique your interest..... some of the best money I have ever invested!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 310 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game
Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game by Michael Lewis (Hardcover - 8 Aug. 2003)
Used & New from: £0.43
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews