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4.1 out of 5 stars
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on 17 April 2012
The book is really interesting. Telling and analyzing stories about different situations where harnessing the wisdom of the many pays more than an expert opinion. It goes far into cooperation and collaboration and links studies to real time events. Interesting reading.
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 26 July 2004
The premise of this book is interesting and the argument is well made. The book's premise is simple but powerful - large, heterogenious groups make good decisions if the decisions of the group can be aggregated in some way. In fact, they make better decisions than lone experts or even small groups of experts. Powerful stuff and persuasively argued.
The problem is that both the premise and argument could have been made in 27 pages - rather than 273. So, instead, he makes the same point again and again and again... and it all becomes a little repetitive and boring. In fact, I stopped learning anything half way through the book and my attention started to waver during the last quarter. I was relieved to finish it.
The book completely omits the Internet - a medium ready-made for large, heterogenius, aggregated groups. This is a pretty amazing omission which seriously damages the book.
There will be much better books on group decision making (and apply it to the Internet) but the first 100 pages of this one makes interesting reading.
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on 15 June 2015
A classic assault on a scourge of our age - the expert knows best. There is a good podcast involving the author here: http://alberttapper.blogspot.co.uk/ (click rosette banner link on right hand side).
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on 16 May 2014
All sort of examples, involved in all kind of topics, that help to understand how and why "WE" think better tha "I" do...

Very interesting and informative.
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on 10 October 2012
Really good book on the way a crowd can have a better guess at the solution to a problem that an expert.

Well worth reading
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on 11 May 2014
very good book, lots of theories inside! Explains the intelligence of a group of people over a single persons decision.
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 13 November 2006
Surely a must have for those interested in crowd behaviour, flow of information and social networks.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
This is the one piece of influence that has changed my line of thinking the most. From stock markets, to prediction markets to human behavior, Surowiecki covers everything in a light and refreshing way that entertains and enlightens at the same time.

get it, read it.
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6 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 17 September 2004
Always take one serious book on holiday - and this year it was the Wisdom of Crowds having heard an interesting review of it on Radio 4. So glad I did - its one of those books which you read and think "yes thats another piece of life's jigsaw that I understand now". The examples used to prove the point are diverse and brilliant from guessing jelly beans in a bottle, to how google works, to optimising the new product development portfolio of a global corporate.
Would have been 5 stars had the overal structure of the book made more sense to me - but that could be just me.
A must for anyone seriously interested on a new perspective on improving decision making, behavioural economic, or simply understanding how people can better work together to find the right answers. Should be mandatory for all students of economics and business.
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Perfect!
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