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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars feisty girls!
This another one of my favourites, and again explores many issues that go on in the outside world. i can refer to this story from my own experiences especially with little mary and the way her mum treats her. I don't think this book is suitable for under 12's because of most of it is grown up stuff with the girls constant fights, teenage pregancy, physical abuse. I am 19...
Published on 6 July 2011 by Bookworm

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Rather like an episode of Jeremy Kyle...
'The Diamond Girls' centres around the lives of Dixie and her three sisters, their mother who is expecting their fifth child (surprise surprise, they all have different fathers) and their new house in the middle of a run-down old council estate. Naturally, not everything goes swimmingly for the family. A family 'friend', Bruce, turns up to help the family with the move...
Published 13 months ago by saintsophie


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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars feisty girls!, 6 July 2011
This review is from: The Diamond Girls (Kindle Edition)
This another one of my favourites, and again explores many issues that go on in the outside world. i can refer to this story from my own experiences especially with little mary and the way her mum treats her. I don't think this book is suitable for under 12's because of most of it is grown up stuff with the girls constant fights, teenage pregancy, physical abuse. I am 19 and i love this book so much so i had 2 get it in the hardback edition!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The most awesome book ever!!, 11 Aug. 2014
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This review is from: The Diamond Girls (Kindle Edition)
Out of all the books J.W has ever written, this one is by far one of the best. It explores many issues that go on in the outside world. The basic story is mum is having a baby and she thinks that the family needs more room. So she buys a house in a place called the planet estate and she tells the diamond girls that there moving straight away. There are four diamond girls Dixie, who is ten, Jude, who is fourteen, Rochelle, who is eleven and Martine, who is sixteen. They don't all get on and there are is a lot of arguing between them and the oldest has a secret that she doesn't tell anyone. Jude also gets into a lot of fights. All the girls have different dads but the only dad you do meet in the book is Dixie`s dad. There is also a guy named Bruce who helps them move in to the new house and he acts like a sort of uncle to the girls. When the family move to there new house its in a very rundown area and the house is a tip, all broken and messy and damaged. But they have not even started unpacking yet when mum goes into labour. Mum is convinced the babies a boy but only Dixie knows the truth. Full of drama, excitement and madness, this book shows you the fun and not so fun things about having a huge family. I read this book from start to finish in a day. I found the story so easy to understand and the way that J.W writes her novels is just amazing because the story flows perfectly from one bit to the other. I like all J.W books but the diamond girls is definitely one of my favourites. I would recommend this book to ages 10 and up because the book contains a little bit of teenage pregnancy and domestic abuse but its not that bad so i think it its suitable for all ages really. Teenagers buy this book. Because its awesome!!!
By Jessica Lenton
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars an excellent book, 2 Aug. 2011
This review is from: The Diamond Girls (Paperback)
well actually they're called the diamond girls because that's their name. they're not fabulously rich or famous or beautiful. they're a bit rough,but their hearts are in the right place -they're rough diamonds! there are four diamond girls.there's martine,jude, Rochelle and Dixie. four girls,four different fathers.but only mum lives at home with the girls.so that makes five diamond girls really.buts that the end of the diamond girl can run because mums having another baby and this times its a boy. mum knows because they have seen it in the stars. that why they have to move. they need more space now there's a little footballer on the way
I'm doing this for all of us. We need a bigger place, now you're all having a little brother.' Mum patted her stomach.
She said it as if we'd all begged for a brother. We'd all been appalled and embarrassed when she told us she was going to have another baby.

Can you imagine what it's like living in a house full of girls, even if they are Diamonds? Maybe you already know what it's like? With the Diamonds there's a great deal of squabbling, and tears and tantrums, and oodles of nail varnish and pink fluffy bits and pieces and bottle blonde hair. And there are boyfriends, of course. They cause a bit of a stir. It's all a bit much for Dixie, who's a dreamer. She hangs on to Bluebell. A budgie. Up her sleeve. Pretend.

It's a bit much for Mum as well, what with the baby, and the move, and all. What they really need is a nice steady bloke with a heart of gold who'll come and help them move their stuff to the new place and sort things out for them a bit:

It was a small skinny guy with a bad haircut and round glasses. They didn't sit comfortably so he had to wrinkle his nose and hitch them up every few seconds.

Poor Bruce. He doesn't know what's about to hit him! Read on. It's another lovely Jacqueline Wilson story, full of high drama and gentle moments, and the blinding truth. Highly recommended. I know you'll love it.

i really enjoyed reading this book by j.w. it kept me in suspence the whole time because it's so easy to understand.The way j.w writes her books is different to the way other authors write their books. Even though this book is fictional it is almost real! All j.w books relate to young and old! if you think your family has difficulties and you dont know how to cope i recomend you read this book and alot more of j.ws books. Her books may all be the same but their the same in different ways. There about diferent problems that teens like you and me face every single day.i give j.w 'The Dimond Girls' and all of j.ws books 10/10
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good book, but ended to suddenly, 1 April 2015
This review is from: The Diamond Girls (Kindle Edition)
The Diamond Girls is about four sisters. Martine is sixteen and is the eldest. Jude is fourteen and is the tomboy of the family. Rochelle is almost thirteen and is very pretty, clever, flirty and mean. Dixie, the youngest, is ten and is a daydreamer.

Their mother is called Sue Diamond and she is thirty-two. All the girls have different fathers and now Sue is going to have another baby. Sue is determined that it will be a boy, she read it in the stars. She decides that she will call the baby Sundance, and that they will have to move away.

All the girls exept Dixie object to this plan for different reasons. Martine, who has a boyfriend next door, doesn't want to leave him. Jude, who happens to have gangs of boys hanging around with her, has her own 'territory' and doesn't want to leave it. Rochelle has the room she shares with Martine 'perfect' and doesn't want to mess it up.

Martine objects most of all because she really doesn't want to leave Tony, her boyfriend. She refuses to come at one point, but Sue appeals to her and and she agrees to stay until the baby's born.

Bruce, a friend of Dixie's dad, helps them move all their stuff to their new house, but when they get to 30 Mercury Street, it's an absolute tip and there's graffiti, litter, and there's sick in the sink. Then, just as they clean up a bit, the baby starts coming.

Sue goes to hospital with Bruce and Martine. Jude, Rochelle, and Dixie stay at home. Jude goes out for some chips and as they have no electricity, some matches. Earlier that day, Dixie was at the bottom of the garden and she made friends the little girl in the garden across from her's and when Jude comes back, she and Dixie go around to her house to ask for some candles.

Mary's mother looks like she is a perfect mother, but as they are leaving Dixie hears something that she doesn't like the sound of at all.

Sue comes back from the hospital extraordinarly early. She brings little Sundance with her but she behaves very strangly with him, not letting anyone hold, touch, dress, change or bathe him exept her. Then Dixie discoveres Mum's secret.

Over all I thought that this was a very good book and I thought that the 'constant things happening' plot was good, but it ended quite suddenly. I wanted to know what happened to Mary, and if her mother was prosecuted.

Overall I think it's a exellent book.

By a ten year old girl
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3.0 out of 5 stars Rather like an episode of Jeremy Kyle..., 23 April 2014
This review is from: The Diamond Girls (Paperback)
'The Diamond Girls' centres around the lives of Dixie and her three sisters, their mother who is expecting their fifth child (surprise surprise, they all have different fathers) and their new house in the middle of a run-down old council estate. Naturally, not everything goes swimmingly for the family. A family 'friend', Bruce, turns up to help the family with the move and ends up being bogged down in the family's dirty laundry. And then stuff... just happens.

The majority of the book just felt like a never-ending Jeremy Kyle soap-opera saga. Although there are some surprisingly interesting plotlines in this story (mainly Mary and her mother, and Dixie's mother's subsequent post-natal ''weirdness'') the majority of the plot just involved endless bickering dialogues amongst the siblings. They argue, they get into endless scraps, one keeps trying to leave the house to meet a boy in McDonalds (why is it ALWAYS McDonalds in Jacqueline Wilson books?) and one of them leaves her mother after calling her a slag. Some of the material (one of the fathers overdosing, physical violence and graphic descriptions of birth) are a little too much for younger readers, so approach with caution. Jacqueline always handles these matters delicately, but it sometimes feels a little raw.

For me the book was just incessant unnecessary quarrelling with a dirty nappy thrown here and there. There are some good parts though as I said, which were just about enough to salvage what would've been a very poor story.
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5.0 out of 5 stars My Daughter LOVES This Book, 18 Jun. 2014
This review is from: The Diamond Girls (Paperback)
My daughter adored this book when she was growing up and recently re-read the book and updated me on how amazing it was. Diamond Girls, admittedly, didn't really draw her in at first. The title made it out as if the girls were rock stars and as if everything was amazing, and truthfully: my daughter doesn't like that. However, after purchasing it she found that she should never judge a book by it's cover.

Diamond Girls is about a family of girls written in the perspective of youngest daughter, Dixie. A big family with a new addition, and everything turns to...maybe even worse then they thought. After a move, after an unexpected arrival and a few fights, the family find themselves all with a secret and Dixie knows every single one. She knows her friend is being abused, she knows her mums dark secret and all of her sisters little stories and little tales. She has to carry the weight of the world.

The book also touches on several topics, all of them controversial. I think this book educates young readers on new things as well as allows the reader to decide on how to view the character as you get alternative ideas. A beautifully harsh book which is enjoyable to read.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars relevant issues, 30 Jan. 2005
This review is from: The Diamond Girls (Hardcover)
As a (semi) adult reader of Jacqueline Wilson, I have developed and increasing amount of respect for her books and the way they deal with so many awkward gritty issues, like child abuse, divorce, child neglect, etc... And in this book, bad parenting - not by the fathers, but by the mothers. I was touched by this book, highlighting the strength of children in the face of some of the darkest adversity. And the kindness and warmth of strangers, in Bruce. Most of all, it was Mary's story that saddened me. The book doesn't deliver a wishy-washy feel good ending either. Teen pregnancy, delusional mothers, absent fathers ... this book has it all, and gives it to you how it is. And, in the end, family's unconditional.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!, 23 Dec. 2012
This review is from: The Diamond Girls (Kindle Edition)
I think this book is really good and shows all different types of personalities. It also shows girls like us how girls like Dixie cope without all the technology and new clothes. I definitely recommend this book to readers who don't know what to read.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A tough book for older tweens, 28 Dec. 2014
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This review is from: The Diamond Girls (Kindle Edition)
When I say tough, I mean the hard-core subjects of The Diamond Girls. It has mild language, not a thing you don't know, and themes are pregnancy and... I don't know. Martine, Jude, Rochelle and Dixie are sisters all with a different dad. They go to the Estate to move somewhere. Their mom is pregnant, Martine is cross, Jude's gone wild, and Rochelle is flirting with boys. Dixie, the baby of the family, just wants to have a peaceful life back at home. But Martine goes missing- and there's something odd about little Mary next door... The Diamond Girls is a real-life read full of suspense, grit, wit and imagination. Classic Jacqueline Wilson at its best, and recommend for girls who want an exciting and modern read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A good read, 12 April 2015
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This review is from: The Diamond Girls (Kindle Edition)
Personally I am a massive fan of Jacqueline Wilson. I am 12 now and probably be reading more adventurous books but the hunger games Harry Potter and Jacqueline Wilson are the best. Diamond girls is quite a moving book that goes through lots of harsh unfair things like dealing with massive family issues and also happy joyful things like mum giving birth again. Much like most of Jacqueline's books they are impossible to put down and I found that I read this book in 2 days. I would definitely read this book again as I love it and rate it 4 stars. I would recommend reading book at the ages 10-13. I think that this is a slightly more advanced book by Jacqueline
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The Diamond Girls
The Diamond Girls by Jacqueline Wilson (Hardcover - 7 Oct. 2004)
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