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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Audacity of Hope
It's not unsurprising that this book was a bestseller in the United States. This book postulates the shape of the 21st century and just what might happen. In 13 chapters, the author presents his opinion that this is the age of America. The war on terrorism: a counterfuge to stop the emergence of an Islamic superpower. The growth of China: a myth that will all fall apart...
Published on 30 Mar 2010 by Ed Foye

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49 of 56 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Big disappointment!
Friedman totally misses the point by contradicting his own opening statements about "identifying long-term underlying trends". He bases the whole book on misguided assumptions and geo-politics. Alvin Toffler pointed out 20 years ago that geo-politics is on the way out...
The real "long-term underlying trends" are not about "dominating sea-trade"! And they are not...
Published on 6 Jan 2010 by F. L. P. Souza


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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A World War in 2050 between Japan and tbe USA, 26 Dec 2012
By 
laurens van den muyzenberg "laurens" (Villa Lama, Super Cannes, 06220 Vallauris Golfe-Juan.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Next 100 Years, The (Paperback)
George Friedman refers to the underlying principles of this book, as "geopolitics does not take the individual leader very seriously any more than economics takes the individual businessman too seriously". "Their actions are determined by circumstances." He further supports this view by reference to the "invisible hand" from Adam Smith. "Geopolitics applies the concept of the invisible hand to the behavior of nations and other international actors, based on "The pursuit of short-term self interests by their leaders." With this as his basic beliefs the author describes what will happen in the next hundred years.
The book describes the process as it moved forward in time. It is easier to summarize going back from the end of the war in 2050. The US policy is assumed to be that it does not accept two powers of similar size to its own in the Euro-Asia area. Two powers through their expansion were on the way to become such powers, Japan and Turkey. It is assumed that Turkey and Japan agree to attack the USA. The USA in alliance with the UK, China and Poland defeats Japan and Turkey and after that rules the world as it imposes on the other countries their exclusive right to control space leading to a golden decade for the USA.
The main events leading up to the war is Russia that tries to expand its territory regaining the territories they lost when the USSR collapsed. They are opposed by Poland supported by the USA and the Soviet Union collapses. Poland occupies a large part of Russia including Petersburg. Turkey takes control of several of the Central Asian States and invades Russia from the South. Germany in the battle of 2050 fears the power of Poland. They therefore attack Poland from the West and and Turkey attacks Poland from the south. The Poles retreat but America and the UK support the Poles leading to the defeat of Germany and Poland. Friedman writes, "This represented the eclipse of Atlantic Europe that started in 1945 and would be complete in the 2050's.
In Asia, Japan succeeded in gaining economic control over several coastal regions of China. because the Chinese living there preferred the investments from Japan over control by Beijing, Japan is totally dependent on oil and minerals transported by sea and decides to attack the USA to abolish their control over the seas. The USA together with whatever power was still in Beijing and South Korea defeat Japan.
The problems Friedman refers to are real. Russia, Japan and Turkey have been empires and there are groups that resent the loss. Zbiginiev Brzezinski in his book "Strategic Vision". "America and the Crisis of Global Power" deals with the same subject. His conclusions are the opposite, in principle and in application. He believes that leaders of countries have influence and are motivated by more than their own short-term interest. His recommendations are that the USA should actively encourage reconciliation between Japan and China and between Poland and Russia. His view is that the USA should help strengthen the European Union and support Turkey in its efforts to join and with a longer-term goal for Russia to join too. The Grand Scheme is a Western alliance of the US and an enlarged European Union. Such a group can guarantee the security of its members and no Asian development could become a threat. On the contrary, the Western Alliance could help Asian countries in avoiding violet actions between them.
The "Next Hundred Years merits five stars for presenting interesting thinking about real risks but as its conclusions are not soundly based I awarded only one star.
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4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Possibly the worst argumented book I've read, 5 Jan 2011
This review is from: The Next 100 Years: A Forecast for the 21st Century (Hardcover)
The author repeatedly makes the mistake of respectively elevating his understanding of the world outside of the US to unbearable levels, and at the same contradicting himself in lack of even the slightest scientific validation of his postulates. And this comes across already in the so called historical part of the book which by definition shouldn't be speculative as opposed to the rest of the book which could be permissible pure and interesting speculations.

Alone one fact that the author hugely treats each and every country's current and easily foreseeable demographic and political setup / shifts with blatant disregard, leaves the reader with the feeling that the author has no idea what is going on outside the US - or for that matter in the US.

It is hugely irritating to pick up a book with such an interesting title just to realize that the author is standing on his own little personal bigoted soapbox.

So, had the author made the least effort not to constantly hammer the poorly argumented opinion home that the US is the greatest in nearly every sense would have made the book more believable.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good exposition of a self-centred worldview - 5 stars, 15 Jan 2012
By 
Wl Buckland - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Next 100 Years, The (Paperback)
This book purports to be a story about the next 100 years in geopolitics. And, at a superficial level, it is. Countries ascend and descend the pecking order in the usual game of snakes and ladders. China, for instance, descends. Turkey and Greece ascend. So far, in fact, that they stage an epic space battle that starts with missiles fired from the moon. Mexico ascends, too, for reasons that are not entirely clear. Europe drifts. And so on.

There are no prizes for guessing which country comes out on top. The greatest country in the world. The one with the noblest, cleverest people. The one which, although it stumbles now and again, stooping below its high ideals, always returns to those ideals in the end and represents the one best hope for humanity. The one whose self-image is so strong that it has managed to convince a substantial (but rapidly declining) chunk of the rest of the world of all the above.

So, this book isn't really about global geopolitics at all. It is about one country, 'us', the good ones. Every other country has a supporting role that shines a positive light on 'us'. The usual solipsistic worldview, the lazy assumptions about the innate goodness of 'us', the desire to be loved, and the yearning for legitimacy, are all present in abundance.

If you don't know which country I am talking about, then it may be worth your reading this book for an insight into your own self-regarding, self-congratulatory culture. If you do know, then don't bother with this book. It's exactly as you would expect and you won't learn anything about the world.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bold geopolitical predictions for the coming century, 26 April 2010
By 
Rolf Dobelli "getAbstract" (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Next 100 Years: A Forecast for the 21st Century (Hardcover)
In this bold, lively and entertaining book, political strategy researcher and analyst George Friedman makes highly specific predications about the 21st century. His discussion of the globe's changing face educates readers about the forces shaping international politics. Friedman is committed to a wide geopolitical perspective, and his predictions rest on broad, detailed historical knowledge. Even if you think some predictions are farfetched (or too specific for such long time frames), the parallels he draws between what happened historically and what he believes will happen in the future are quite educational. getAbstract recommends Friedman's book to professionals involved in international business or long-term strategic planning, and to any reader interested in pragmatic, interesting and, of course, theoretical, assertions about the future.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The next hundred years? Perhaps., 14 Mar 2010
By 
D. SWATMAN (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Next 100 Years, The (Hardcover)
Very provocative and obviously Americocentric. I have reservations about much of it, especially the dismissal of many of today's major issues as 'trivial'. It seems to be a reiteration of the 'Europe is dead, long live America' outlook, I think, and one that is stated so often in the book that I suspect the author is trying to convince himself. Isn't this called hubris? Nevertheless, it is a valuable catalyst to get one thinking (and arguing) - and that can't be a bad thing.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Book., 28 Aug 2010
By 
W. Farmer "wf01" (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Next 100 Years, The (Paperback)
* PLEASE NOTE : It basically talks about the next 100 years in geopolitical terms, if you want something more social/technological read The Next 50 Years.

However, thoroughly enjoyed this book, it has even changed my view from Anti-EU to pro-EU and pro Mass Immigration :). Reassuringly Britain is only mentioned a few times, we should be safe for the next 100 years provided we stick with the US!
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4 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Fictional Best Seller - At Best, 18 Jun 2010
By 
M. G. Chisholm "chiefengineer3" (UK) - See all my reviews
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Utter pap.

I was given this to read by a chap I work with under the impression that it was a well researched and impartial book. What a load of old tripe.

Firstly lets get the elephant out in the open. This is a book primarily designed to sell well in America, and on that basis the only point of view is that America is the numero uno country in the world and all others shall follow.

There are clearly massive holes in that argument if you have ever spent any time in the US for kick off. China is discounted as still a country that will lag behind America for a number of reasons. Russia is a waste of space and as for Europe - well we no longer count. So immediately we see where it's nonsense. China already has more purchasing power than the US, whilst Europe as a whole is the biggest economic zone in the world. And as for writing off Russia - how dumb?

This book is nothing more than an ego panderer to a inwardly looking American public. It has no place as a serious work of future trends.

Buy this if you are American or your view of the USA is entirely based upon Hollywood movies. If however you have been there, especially in work, then by page 50 you'll be spitting feathers.
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The Next 100 Years: A Forecast for the 21st Century
The Next 100 Years: A Forecast for the 21st Century by George Friedman (Hardcover - 20 Jan 2009)
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