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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Suspenseful,intriguing and satisfying novel set in China.
This novel of the intersection of language, identity, cultures and sex in an archeological expedition in China today is one of the best I have read in quite a while. With the Jesuit rebel priest and anthropologist, Teilhard de Chardin, as the leit-motif behind most of the personal interactions. the reader is offered new insights into human as well as divine love.The...
Published on 2 Feb 1999

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully descriptive, mildly entertaining & engrossing
The first few pages caught me but as a whole, the book was disappointing. First, I found the descriptions of China very vivid. I especially enjoyed the cultural aspects and nuances. The story of Lucille and Tiellard was much more facinating than Alice's story. Alice was whiney and repetitous. There wasn't a single character to sympathize with. I wanted more character...
Published on 19 Feb 1999


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Suspenseful,intriguing and satisfying novel set in China., 2 Feb 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Lost in Translation (Hardcover)
This novel of the intersection of language, identity, cultures and sex in an archeological expedition in China today is one of the best I have read in quite a while. With the Jesuit rebel priest and anthropologist, Teilhard de Chardin, as the leit-motif behind most of the personal interactions. the reader is offered new insights into human as well as divine love.The protagonists are an American woman trying to get as far away as possible from her racist father and the culture he ordains, an American anthropologist trying to recover Peking Man to restore his career, and a Chinese anthropologist who has been traumatized by the Cultural Revolution (called the Chaos by Chinese today)and his wife's destruction by it.Alice Mannegan's attempts to become Chinese are doomed despite her proficiency in the language and knowledge of the culture and history of China. It's painful but enthralling to watch her try to come to terms with her father, her "true Chinese man" Dr. Lin, and her possible future in China. She is not the most likeable person, but she is not repellant in any way. Just foolish in her understanding of herself and her history.Adam Spencer the American anthropologist who hires Alice as translator is the least interesting. Dr. Lin and the many Chinese actors in this tale reveal a great deal about contemporary China which I daresay most westerners,including myself, do not know.The mystery and the history of Peking Man's discovery, disappearance and possible final end is exciting. One learns much Chinese geography, customs and traditions, the subtleties of Chinese ideas, and the difficulties of life there today. We are very different from one another and we Americans do not realize how fortunate we are.As one who has lived in a foreign culture, I understand some of the difficulties an expatriate faces. This is a grand book which leaves one feeling satisfied by the truth of the emotions revealed and by the resolution of the mysteries at the core. Read it, you'll like it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A mesmerizing page-turner of past, present & future lives., 13 Aug 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Lost in Translation (Hardcover)
Running from her father's racism, Alice Mannegan has carved a life of sorts in Beijing,China. By day she is a translator opening the Chinese world to foreigners. At night she moves from bar to bar hoping that Chinese world will open for her. All that changes when she teams with American and Chinese archaelogists in a search for the remains of Peking Man. As the search unfolds, Mones offers her readers wonderfully panoramic glimpses of her characters, each as complex as the Chinese culture itself. This is a compelling story of cultural and family histories, each complex in their own way. It is also a story of love - losing it , regaining it, and realizing that sometimes it is never lost at all. Mones' knowledge, and obvious love, of China combined with her storytelling create a novel that enriches its readers. I highly recommend it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I loved this book!, 23 Aug 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Lost in Translation (Paperback)
This book is so original, like another reveiwer I didn't want it to end. Nicole Mones obviously loves China and "Lost In Translation" contains many insights into both the country and the people. At the begining of the book you learn that Alice wishes she were Chinese, and as the novel progresses you understand more and more why she feels this way.
If you only read one book about a foreigner's experience in China, this should be the one.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wondeful read, 29 Jun 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Lost in Translation (Hardcover)
I really enjoyed this book. The back drop of searching for Peking Man gave it a very entertaining adventurous quality. And the other side of the novel, Alice Mannegan's search for herself and for love, was even more engrossing. One reviewer said that it was impossible to relate to any of the characters - I disagree. I found immense character development in this novel, and I especially sympathized with Alice. I loved this book and would recommend it to anyone.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Inspirational, fulfilling, mysterious and wonderful., 3 Oct 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Lost in Translation (Hardcover)
The author, albeit a new author, has found a way to weave in mystery, love, history and an unusual cultural background into a most beautiful tapestry. Thought provoking, energizing, mesmerizing(at times) and has a unique style I found almost academic without being dry as old papyrus (as most writers tend to do when utilizing cultures not their own into books). For a first-time author, Mones is well endowed with the properties and talents to become one of our "Great American Authors". As a known "book-a-holic" to my family and many friends, this is not a light comment for me to make. I heartily recommend this book to anyone who loved "Memoirs of a Geisha" - along the same genre with a different style of writing. Bravo to both Nicole Mones and Arthur Golden - our new stars rising!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delicious, engaging story of an American expatriot in China, 3 Nov 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Lost in Translation (Hardcover)
This book immediately draws you into a fascinating world of an American female who is escaping her life as the child of a racist politician in Texas. We see the depth of the character in her relationship to her father and to her Chinese lovers as well as her choice to join a group of Chinese and American scholars on an expedition to find the remains of Peking man. Eventually we, as readers, are privileged to witness dramatic changes in awareness that lead both romantic characters slowly and profoundly toward one another. The thread of quotes from the philosopher, Teilhard de Chardin, that run through the story is intriguing as is the opportunity to witness landscapes both physical, cultural and emotional in the world of China. A brilliant, intricate book which will engage readers of many interests.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A long and winding trail to an ironic conclusion., 4 Nov 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Lost in Translation (Hardcover)
This is an absolute gem of a book. Once I started it, I didn't want to put it down. The author's style is very readable, and the plot flows naturally and in a very captivating manner. The reader is truly swept into a different world, and we are reminded, both gently and not so gently of all the freedoms we take so often for granted. There are so many wonderful and ironic plot twists, and I thought the final disposition of the highly sought-after Peking man was amusing, horrifying, and perhaps even fitting for the cultural setting! I would highly recommend it to anyone who likes a good read, with a slightly scientific or investigative bent.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing, 14 July 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Lost in Translation (Hardcover)
The search for the missing remains of Peking Man, using the letters of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin as a guide, forms the basis of this elaborately plotted novel of personal conflicts competing with material desires. Alice, the American translator, seeks to bury herself in the role of "outsider" as a self-inflicted punishment for being the daughter of a famously racist US Senator. The archaeologist hopes to win the love of his estranged son and the respect of the academic community. And the Chinese liason hopes to finally solve the mystery of his missing wife, swept up in the chaos of the Cultural Revolution twenty years before.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent view of China and its history and culture, 8 Sep 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Lost in Translation (Hardcover)
I find myself fascinated with Chinese culture and enjoy being able to take a look inside. This book was fascinating, I couldn't put it down. The mixture of history, the characters, the travel, and the romantic potential are a driving force to keep you hooked. It is the story of Alice Mannegan who has submerged into Chinese life as a translator. She left the USA to get away from a controlling father and finds herself absorbed but without direction. She embarks on a new adventure with an American archaelologist and this is the beginning of change in her life.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't put it down!, 2 Mar 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Lost in Translation (Hardcover)
Once I opened this book and started reading, I couldn't stop. I agreed with the many reviewers in newspapers and magazines:these are fully realized characters, subtly shaded, and their journey through the story was compelling and affecting.At times,moving. This was a powerful portrait of China in the throes of change, humanistically done--through the feelings and memories of individuals living through those changes. A great love story without easy answers or perfect endings. Enthralling, intelligent and erotic. A great read.
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Lost in Translation
Lost in Translation by Nicole Mones (Hardcover - 29 Sep 1998)
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