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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unleash the Natural Learner Within By Using A Changed Focus
This book deserves more than five stars, because it explains how you can be most effective in learning, gaining experience, and achieving higher performance. The principles are based on Mr. Gallwey's earlier successful coaching experiences and books about the inner games of tennis and golf. That may sound like an unlikely way to approach becoming more effective at work,...
Published on 23 May 2004 by Donald Mitchell

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Cut to the chase - go directly to Chapter 9
I know it's a best seller, and millions of people can't be wrong, but for me, this book is based on a very thin premise – that of a negative voice. This is expounded in the first 8 chapters – skip directly to Chapter 9 would be my recommendation. And unfortunately, thats almost the last chapter. Here things do start to get useful as we move into types of...
Published 20 months ago by Angela Sabin Executive Life Co...


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unleash the Natural Learner Within By Using A Changed Focus, 23 May 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Inner Game of Work (Hardcover)
This book deserves more than five stars, because it explains how you can be most effective in learning, gaining experience, and achieving higher performance. The principles are based on Mr. Gallwey's earlier successful coaching experiences and books about the inner games of tennis and golf. That may sound like an unlikely way to approach becoming more effective at work, but it is unusually effective for those who have ever played tennis or golf by providing a visceral point of reference.
I could immediately relate to the book's ideas, because both my tennis and golf performances are hindered by the critical stream of commentary that flows in my head as I play these sports. Occasionally, I quiet the criticism and I play much better.
To me, the explanation of how to help someone improve their tennis or golf games, or do their work better was a real eye opener. If you encourage someone to simply notice what is going on during the performance of the act (where they strike the ball relative to their feet in tennis, the lie of the ball in golf, or the important circumstances of the work environment), the person will quickly and easily find their own solutions to becoming more effective. That made sense to me because I have been operating without taking golf lessons for about a year and a half now, and many parts of the game have improved in major ways. I have taken charge of making my own diagnoses of what I need to do differently, and have learned a lot that I did not grasp from taking lessons. That experience validated the author's approach for me.
The other reason it made sense is that in my own coaching activities with business executives about their work, I always find that people know the answer to their own issues if you can give them a more helpful focus to open their minds and help them recall information that they have observed in other contexts. That is exactly the coaching method that Mr. Gallwey describes in this book.
The model here is that our conscious minds tend to focus on harmful criticism that provides limited useful information about what we should be doing. On the other hand, our subconscious minds are very good at directing us when we let loose of the chatter from our conscious minds.
Mr. Gallway takes that observation and builds methods to help you set inspiring, authentic, and meaningful goals for learning, gaining experience, and becoming more productive. He gives you tools to shift you focus away from the concerns of the conscious mind, and how to coach others to do the same in their learning. He then links all of this to creating conscious choices to change your direction and behavior in ways that serve you better. To make this last step easier, he provides several alternative perceptual analogies to encourage you. The book has a series of effective exercises you can do to pursue those analogies. The book also provides many examples drawn from the author's consulting experiences to help bring the points home. I am sure that many of these will strike a familiar bell with you.
I plan to cite this book in my future writing, because it is an important contribution to how we can reestablish the wonderful learning capability we all had as children, in a way that is appropriate for adults.
Be sure to share this book with others you care about so you can learn to coach each other, as a way to reinforce your progress toward nonjudgmental learning. That will be a 2,000 percent solution for you both!
I also suggest that you reread this book from time to time . . . especially if you find that you are not accomplishing things as easily and as joyfully as you would like.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simple but profound insights about learning, 7 Jun 2009
By 
DF McCleland (Johannesburg, South Africa) - See all my reviews
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In 1976 the author Timothy Gallwey, gained a remarkable insight when trying to coach tennis. He pondered whether he was aiding or preventing the learning experience. This revolutionary thought process was provoked when he discovered that by asking the learner to focus on the ball & not the shot - by stating out aloud what the ball was doing - immediately improved the person's ability to play the ball.

In fact he found that the generally accepted method of providing advice as a coach on how to improve the shot was having the converse effect viz preventing the shot from being played correctly. This insight calls into question the role of the coach in the learning process.

From this profound insight arose the concepts of Self 1 & Self 2 where Self 2 was the non judgmental & intuitive part of oneself whereas Self 1 was the judgmental part which was invoked or provoked by traditional methods.

Typical training invoked the Self 1 which hindered the learning process. Evolving from this is the concept that in most situations the person had the innate ability to perform the task themselves. To prevent the Self 1 from automatically kicking-in, the role of the coach would instead focus on invoking Self 2.

Gallwey then expands this concept & demonstrates into applicability in the world of work. His first assignment involves the improvement in the tedious job of call centre operator.

Gallwey discusses how one can maximize one's enjoyment of even mundane tasks. By enjoying a task one is in a "state of flow" or "in the zone".

Other concepts are also introduced viz STOP when "renewal" is required. This relates to STEP BACK, THINK, ORGANISE YOUR THOUGHTS & then PROCEED. This is also a powerful concept to employ when floundering under pressure.

However what resulted in a score of a meager 3 is the attempt to philosophize. Maybe it's Mr. Gallwey's attempt to shed light on the application of these concepts, but instead I found them tedious & repetitive.

The concept of Self 1 & 2 undoubted has wide applicability & will no doubt gain greater acceptance with quality of work life issues on the ascendancy in the Western world. This is useful book for the collection as one needs to "dip in" every now & then. Overall there are some powerful & appropriate concepts which can be learnt but it could have been covered in half the number of pages.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must have coaching resource, 4 Oct 2010
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A seminal work the forces you to reappraise your attitude to work, feedback and criticism. Those progressing a career in Coaching or Mentoring should employ this book as a keystone text to challenge not only their clients, but themselves.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gallwey meets corporate America, 24 Feb 2009
Most modern business coaches know of Tim Gallwey and his development of 'inner game' principles.

If you've followed his work applied to tennis, golf etc, you'll be familar with the approach of reducing interference, promoting focus and quietening the internal chatter between our two selves.

This book tracks the adoption if these principles by big business and sets out how Gallweys ideas, though founded in sport, can bring massive benefits in promoting better work performance.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Read, 11 Oct 2013
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All managers should consider this as essential reading when considering how to build effective teams that combine productivity with a good sense of the team and individuallity.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Read this first!, 16 Aug 2013
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This is an extremely influential book. It is the source of the successful work of so many people who have gone on to refine and publish their methods for coaching and consulting in the workplace.
It is easily understood and practiced, which is the whole point, really.
It offers opportunity for development for anyone today, not just those engaged in change processes.
It makes so much sense that you will be drawn into using the practices without knowing it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A great coaching book, 10 Aug 2012
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This is the first Tim Gallwey book I have read and can thoroughly recommend it. Tim started his career in formal education and then found a new way of learning, that formal education missed. Working as a coach and raising awareness of the coachee, he found that learning was enabled from their own experiences and so was more relevant for the learner. There is lots of great coaching insights in this book.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Cut to the chase - go directly to Chapter 9, 8 April 2013
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I know it's a best seller, and millions of people can't be wrong, but for me, this book is based on a very thin premise – that of a negative voice. This is expounded in the first 8 chapters – skip directly to Chapter 9 would be my recommendation. And unfortunately, thats almost the last chapter. Here things do start to get useful as we move into types of coaching conversations - for awareness; for choice and for trust. Great questions for my coaching toolbox.
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3.0 out of 5 stars good, 22 Nov 2014
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This review is from: Inner Game of Work (Hardcover)
For the price, good condition
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Inner Game of Work
Inner Game of Work by Tim Gallwey (Hardcover - 31 Dec 1997)
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