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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Blinded Man renamed
Be warned.
This is exactly the same book as the one entitled "The Blinded Man".
I don't know whether this is an American problem or a Scandinavian problem. This renaming has happened with several crime novels sourced from Scandinavia - and it is very annoying.
Ken
Published 12 months ago by Ken Grierson

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Does Not Deliver the Action, Sex, or Violence that Larsson Did
"Misterioso" is a new crime novel, a police procedural, by the Swedish author Arne Dahl, another hot candidate for the attention of readers left bereft by the untimely death of that phenomenally successful Swedish author Steig Larsson, who gave the world the Millenium trilogy. MISTERIOSO is projected to be the first novel in this writer's "Intercrime" trilogy...
Published on 26 Aug 2011 by Stephanie De Pue


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Blinded Man renamed, 10 July 2013
This review is from: Misterioso (Hardcover)
Be warned.
This is exactly the same book as the one entitled "The Blinded Man".
I don't know whether this is an American problem or a Scandinavian problem. This renaming has happened with several crime novels sourced from Scandinavia - and it is very annoying.
Ken
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Misterioso--Arne Dahl, 25 Aug 2011
By 
Simon Clarke (Hackney, London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Misterioso (Hardcover)
This first novel of a series is a captivating,enthralling thriller.
A seriel killer is on the loose in Sweden,murdering wealthy business
men.-Shooting them with two shots to the head whilst listening to
'Misterioso', a jazz track by Thelonius Monk.
Detective Paul Hjelm,is expecting to be fired from the police,but
instead he is asked to join an elite task force to track down the
killer. The team work at a frantic pace chasing numerous leads,
which takes them into the murkier areas of Swedish life.
This novel has all the ingredients that make a first-class crime
thriller.Strong characterisation,social awareness,an innovative
plot,and endearing wit.
This edition was published in USA,and one can only hope that a
UK edition is published without delay.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars WARNING!, 8 April 2013
Misterioso is the same Arne Dahl book as The Blinded Man also sold by Amazon with no note saying they are the same book. I have wasted money buy buying both and am not happy!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First in long-awaited Intercrime series is an excellent start., 26 Sep 2011
By 
Maxine Clarke "Maxine of Petrona" (Kingston upon Thames, Surrey United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Misterioso (Hardcover)
English-language readers have waited a long time to read Arne Dahl's well-regarded series about a small unit within the Swedish police force that deals with serious crimes, set up in direct response to the massive and confused official response to the assassination of Olaf Palme. The eventual translation is a US edition - and we have to be thankful that the first book in the series (the second to be written but chronologically the first) has now been published in English, unlike many other crime series from non-English speaking countries which are translated mid-way through. (While mentioning the translation, I note that Tiina Nunnally has done her usual excellent job with this text.)

Misterioso focuses on Paul Hjelm, a police detective stationed in a Stockholm suburb who defuses a hostage crisis before it gets out of hand. Because of the ethnic origin of the perpetrator, and because of his method of resolving the situation, Hjelm is handed over to internal affairs and is interrogated by two unpleasant Sapo (state secret police) officers. Worried that he is going to lose his job, and feeling alienated from his wife and teenage son, Hjelm even begins to doubt his own motives for his actions. He's soon plucked out of his dilemma, however, by being invited to join a small, dedicated team of police officers in the national crime squad who will be assigned to particularly serious crimes. Hjelm signs up and meets his new colleagues in a useful (to the reader) meeting where each of them briefly identifies themselves and provides a bit of background.

The timing for the formation of the group (informally known as the A team) has been forced by two very similar crimes in which rich businessmen have been assassinated. In the absence of any clues, Hjelm and his colleagues embark on the kind of classic investigation that is familiar to the reader of police procedurals: the team searches for any connection between the men, social, financial or professional, in order to identify and protect the next victim(s). This investigation forms the bulk of the book, as the team follows up clues and possible leads in their increasingly desperate, and apparently fruitless, attempt that lurches from exclusive golf clubs to the Estonian mafia, and from private yachts to the boards of Sweden's main institutions. For those, like me, who love reading about these details, this book is a real treat - the author provides just enough details about Hjelm's personal life, and a few hints about the other team-members, to maintain the human interest in the characters while the plot twists and turns.

There is a break in the case after about 200 pages, when the title of the book, Misterioso, is revealed in a three-part `definition'. The key clue is a cassette tape which leads to a subplot that is quite quaint to readers in 2011: the book is set in 1997 when many people still listened to cassettes. The book itself has dated remarkably little, however, with the crash of the Swedish economy a few years before the book opens, caused by reckless bank lending - a situation which also contributes significantly to the plot and which is certainly extremely relevant today.

I very much enjoyed Misterioso. Although there are some necessary `setting up' sections paving the way for future novels about the same characters, and although the solution to the mystery involves one event that is necessary to frustrate the A-team's investigation but is otherwise not (to me) credible, the book is compelling and exciting. The chasing down of the clues was, to me again, more interesting than the showdown section near the end of the book and the revelation of what is going on and why, but overwhelmingly this is an absorbing and intelligent novel that makes me very keen to read more titles in the series (which so far number 11). I hope they will be translated soon.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Does Not Deliver the Action, Sex, or Violence that Larsson Did, 26 Aug 2011
By 
Stephanie De Pue (Wilmington, NC USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Misterioso (Hardcover)
"Misterioso" is a new crime novel, a police procedural, by the Swedish author Arne Dahl, another hot candidate for the attention of readers left bereft by the untimely death of that phenomenally successful Swedish author Steig Larsson, who gave the world the Millenium trilogy. MISTERIOSO is projected to be the first novel in this writer's "Intercrime" trilogy.

Stockholm police detective Paul Hjelm is enduring the requisite--and quite likely career-ending-- investigation by Internal Affairs after he has successfully ended a hostage situation at an immigration office in the city's suburbs by the unsanctioned use of his firearm that caused injury to the hostage-taker. But Hjelm is saved by the bell; luckily for him, a sophisticated new serial killer suddenly arises, accompanied by overwhelming news coverage. Hjelm is plucked out of IA's sticky grasp by the National Criminal Police commissioner, who drops the detective into an elite new task force of officers being assembled from across the country to find the recently activated killer. The murderer has been targeting Sweden's high-profile business leaders by breaking into their homes at night, waiting for them, placing two bullets in their heads, and removing the bullets from the walls. The unknown assailant performs all this ritual, the police discover, to a rare bootleg recording of the world-renowned American jazz pianist Thelonious Monk's classic "Misterioso." The investigation will lead the detectives to the Russian Maffia in exile, yacht clubs, golf clubs, and the secret societies of the nation's rich and powerful.

Dahl, an award-winning crime novelist and critic, appears to have a competent grasp of police work, and writes well, although he was not able to bring his characters - the cops, the victims, nor the villain, alive to me. Nor Stockholm, or Sweden, in summer. Nor is he delivering the action that Larsson did in the Millenium trilogy. Nor the sex and violence that Scandinavian crime fiction seems frequently to deliver. And I actually was reading Scandinavian crime fiction long ago, going back to Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo's Martin Beck, and Peter Hoeg's SMILLA'S SENSE OF SNOW, which just might be distinguished by having the silliest, as Alfred Hitchcock called it, Macguffin (that thing the chase is actually all about)ever. Well, Dahl might have delivered a tight little mystery centered on "Misterioso;" but he seems to have instead labored to add layers of socio-politico-economic commentary to his work. He needn't have bothered for me.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Quite enjoyable, 26 Mar 2013
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I do feel that prospective buyers of this novel should be aware that the same story is also available as The Blinded Man - The 1st Intercrime thriller by Arne Dahl. I thought that with two different titles (Misterioso / The Blinded Man) I was buying two different police procedurals. No - they are one and the same, and maybe that fact clouded my overall reaction to the book.
At the end of the day, this is another police procedural from Scandinavia. I was kept interested throughout the narration that I wanted to finish the book, and so, in that sense, the book worked, but I don't feel that it stands a second reading. I enjoyed it enough that I am glad I read it, but I don't think I will rush (out) and buy another Arne Dahl, because I feel there are better writers from the region.
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Misterioso
Misterioso by Arne Dahl (Hardcover - 12 July 2011)
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