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98 of 100 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "He was just like everybody else now"
I have read my fair share of fantasy and have therefore found several cases in which the author creates a well-crafted world. Orson Scott Card excels in this aspect, presenting a setting that is on the borderline between a fantastic world and a possible future for our own existence. One of the aspects that I enjoyed most about this work is the complex set of rules created...
Published on 16 May 2005 by Sebastian Fernandez

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Meh
The story had some great science fiction ideas. But ultimately was rather predictable. The big problem for me is that the hero is one of those who can do everything and is great and everything and never did I feel there was any challenge for him. It's a nice read but not much more than that.
Published 16 months ago by Mark Hardy


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98 of 100 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "He was just like everybody else now", 16 May 2005
By 
Sebastian Fernandez (Tampa, Florida United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I have read my fair share of fantasy and have therefore found several cases in which the author creates a well-crafted world. Orson Scott Card excels in this aspect, presenting a setting that is on the borderline between a fantastic world and a possible future for our own existence. One of the aspects that I enjoyed most about this work is the complex set of rules created by the author and the heavy weight politics and philosophy play in the story.
Andrew Wiggin, also known as Ender due to his sister's inability for voicing his real name, is a very special little kid. His parents received a special permission from the government to have a third child due to their outstanding genes, overriding the law that prevents having more that two kids. As a result Ender has worn a monitor since his birth and every one of his actions has been analyzed in extreme detail. But now the monitor needs to come off, and the people that have been monitoring him are interested in making life difficult for him to unveil his reactions.
Of course it does not stop there, and when the offer from Colonel Graff for joining the Battle school is presented to Ender, he has to go fulfill his duty and leave behind his family and the human being he cares about the most, his sister Valentine. The Battle School should not be taken lightly. Eighty years ago, the humans fought a war against the buggers and were only able to survive thanks to a brilliant commander. Now humanity depends on the ability of the high ranks of the military to find a new leader, and Ender is one of the hopes they have for salvation. The fact that he is younger than most in Battle School will certainly make things difficult for him, and keep things interesting for us.
Besides providing with great entertainment, this book makes us think about what may lie in the future, what are the ethical implications of war and whether or not is OK to achieve our ends without caring for what the means used are. We also get an interesting fictional look at life in the military, and our fare share of action. One thing about this book is undeniable; it is like nothing you have ever read, so if you are looking for something different, this one is for you.
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71 of 73 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Was my favourite read for a long time, 14 Aug 2003
I love reading, and I always have a book on the go. I have therefore read a fair few books. But of all the great books I have read, I only recommend three, and this is one of them. When I started reading Enders Game I was intrigued right from the start. I quickly became engrossed and then completely absorbed to the point I didn't want to put it down. I would read it for hours on end.
Why? People often say that the book is better than the film. Enders Game to me has the same distinction from other books. The story is incredibly absorbing and exceptionally fulfilling to read. You always want to know whats going to happen next and the story just keeps building and building. At no point does it disappoint or ebb. There are lots of books I have read and enjoyed, but Enders Game really stands out from the crowd. It was a real pleasure to read.
I had doubts about a book staring a six year old. I needn't have doubted. Ender is an exceptionally likeable and interesting character, he really grew on me and I felt a real connection. The only negative point I can think of is that its a real downer to finish the book, but only because it has finished. I can truly recommend this book to everyone as it is without doubt one of those rare books that truly rewards the reader!
A word of warning, if you are planning to buy this book, better not read lgonggr's review below (Leimuiden, Netherlands). He mentions some things that in my opinion may spoil your experience!
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A thought-provoking, exciting, and emotional novel, 10 Feb 2008
By 
Ender's Game is a book that will speak directly to whoever reads it, for it is about loneliness and specialist expertise - two things that everyone is familiar with in their own lives, in one way or another.

Ender is a young prodigy space battle commander whose adventures through training school make up most of the book. Ender makes friends and enemies, and must deal with life in a world where no-one understands him, except his sister who he never sees because she is on Earth while he is training in space.

The book covers a lot of different topics, but principle among Card's many theses is that to beat an enemy one must understand them completely: one must - in a manner of speaking - love them. This is a powerful notion and one that is explored in detail, with a very emotionally resonant ending and surprise epilogue.

I particularly enjoyed the videogame which Ender returns to throughout the book, where he is exploring an alien planet and battling various nightmarish foes, solving puzzles, and put under extreme emotional strain. It reminded me of the kind of videogames we are beginning to see nowadays (such as Shadow of the Colossus) and I was amazed an author had come up with it so many years ago.

An emotional and intelligent book, for adults and children alike.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very enjoyable read, 21 Jan 2008
By 
Trickle Tree (The universe) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
I am not in anyway a fan of science fiction genre but this book blew me away. I enjoyed the way that it is plot and character driven so the author's voice disappeared into the story and it wasn't full of self-conscious descriptions.

The book is about shaping a child to become a powerful leader and I felt it was written so that the reader too becomes a part of his adoring crowd. I enjoyed the battle games enormously and the way they had to detach themselves from their accustomed rules of gravity. I found myself so absorbed in Ender's World that I began to develop tactics myself on a shopping trip to the supermarket and planning the aisles I would go up and down to get to sections to avoid fellow shoppers. You had to be there.

I too was struck early on in the novel about its similarities to Harry Potter which I have never fancied reading but have seen clips of the films.

Anyway this book is plain and simple good old-fashioned escapism and has enough undercurrents to get your grey matter working applying the situations to current events. I also have recently read Slaughter House Five which is subtitled The Children's Crusade and I would recommend these books as a pairing. They aren't much alike but do throw up interesting thoughts.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good book with minor flaws, 4 Oct 2003
By 
Kelvin M. Green (Island of the Mosquito Women) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is an excellent science fiction novel, with a fun plot and brilliant characterisation. The game sequences are surprisingly involving and it's hard not to want to join in. It's also remarkably difficult to put this book down, as it flows so well.
My only criticisms are that its origin as a short story are very clear by the end, and that a final anti-war sequence feels as though it was tacked on, and is rather unnecessary as the book as a whole certainly has an anti-war message.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Science Fiction Masterpiece, 14 May 2003
By 
G. Haywood - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Ender's Game is an extremely well written book who's concept is that all the extremely intelligent children on Earth are being raised to fight a war against an enemy that tried to wipe out human life on Earth. My own experiences and that of others who've read this book shows the author has a great understanding of what it is like to be an intelligent child. The plot of the story plays with this understanding to perfection as Ender is moulded by the Battle School to be a perfect military genius.
I cannot recommend this book highly enough.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Riveting!!, 10 Oct 2003
By A Customer
I read this when I was seventeen and picked it up again (from the library!) on the off-chance that my non-fiction reading husband might like it. He did. I've never seen him forego conversation for a book before.
It's wild to read these super genius children conducting war strategy and Ender, who in the beginning of the book is only six, treats every single situation (including social encounters) from the view of a military commander. The action clues anyone in about the thrill of tactics and strategy. The story is a unique take on an old theme. And there is a fabulous twist at the end.
I wouldn't recommend my husband to read the sequels as I did when I was younger. I love novels and sci fi, he doesn't. So this book on its own merit I would recommend for everyone. The sequels are in a different vein so don't bother unless you're the sort, like me, who loves books both average and great.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding Fiction, 17 Mar 2007
By 
A. J. Silvers "AJ Silvers" (England, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Ender's game is an amazing novel, from the concept to the execution OSC has put together a masterpiece. Ender is a moving, compassionate and empathetic character. You will laugh, you will cry, you will track him through the high's and lows of this moving and gripping novel.

Many novels dealing with epic subject matter have a huge cast and are set upon a canvass as wide as the star field. Here, the fate of a boy and the fate of the human race come together in a deftly written novel. I cannot wait to read OSC's other work.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Meh, 2 Dec 2012
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The story had some great science fiction ideas. But ultimately was rather predictable. The big problem for me is that the hero is one of those who can do everything and is great and everything and never did I feel there was any challenge for him. It's a nice read but not much more than that.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good read, 20 Dec 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Ender's Game (Hardcover)
Ender's Game was a good book; when I was in Junior High. And Im not going to mark it down because Im older now. Its still a good book and will continue to be. I thought the story line and the characters were imaginative and well thought out. I dont suggest this book for the older audience, but It would make a good gift for a teenager. The lower scorers should have done thair homework and found out what level a reader would be reading this book. I feel Orson Scott Card did a good job at bringing in the younger crowd into the usually criptic realm of Sci-fi. When you read this book you must remember that it is Science Fiction; and not reality. Sure Ender is young to be acting like an adult; but so was Caesar and Augustus and they were real. All I can say is read it and keep an open mind.
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Ender's Game (Ender Saga)
Ender's Game (Ender Saga) by Orson Scott Card (Paperback - 1 Dec 2011)
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