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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Read
By avoiding describing the initial arrival of "zombies" other than in short flashbacks, the author manages to create some three-dimensional characters the reader cares about. This is in marked contrast to some other works in the same genre which, although they are rollicking reads, remain cartoon-like.

Feed creates a world I could see myself in, and the testing...
Published on 8 Nov. 2010 by Martin Barrett

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Missing certain crucial ingredients
I really enjoyed Feed and was looking forward to the sequel. However, possible spoilers ahead, Deadline was missing a few key ingredients that made Feed so good. It also included stuff that really wasn't necessary. If you liked Feed for all the action and fighting, you really might not enjoy the sequel.

As a read, its pretty good. Its just as accessible and...
Published on 2 Jan. 2012 by C. Verspeak


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Horribly written, no believable dialogue between characters; very limited vocabulary ; painful to read, 29 Sept. 2014
By 
raymond hickey (co.dublin, dublin Ireland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Feed: The Newsflesh Trilogy: Book 1 (Paperback)
Horribly written, no believable dialogue between characters; painful to read
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars not your average zombie book, 6 Sept. 2013
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got talked into reading this, and was reluctant as i did not think i would like a mindless zombie book, but from the first page I could see that it was not what I imagined. witty, funny, intense and a solid story from page one and throughout, once you read this book you will be desparate to read the other two in the series
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars does the post apocalypse need this many journalists?, 11 Nov. 2011
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The premise sounds good at first until you start to get into the main plot and find really that the author seems more interested in writing a weak political thriller (sans thrills) in which the zombies are barely relevant apart from as a device to create a slightly askew backdrop world. This is then used to display a set of weak in-jokes and an implausible take on a post apocalypse society where its no wonder they haven't found a cure as they seem to have devoted all their time to creating a micromanaged system of regulating journalists and news seems to be the only form of entertainment delivered by bloggers with no visible source of income.
If you can get past the bizarre and implausible society, the raising of journalists to the level of superheroes and the straight from a direct-to-video film dialogue; its actually well written and the creation mythology of the zombies is clever and unique. it does however, suffer from the sme fate as many books written in the first person; the main characters knowledge seems to expand to fit whatever the circumstances require which comes across as implausible and somewhat lazy.
five years ago, this would have been an acceptable attempt but with the current deluge of zombie literature you can afford to pick and choose and i won't be picking up the rest of the trilogy
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars, 16 Sept. 2014
By 
Mr. M. P. Roberts "theagelessstranger" (Green, Green Grass of Home) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Feed: The Newsflesh Trilogy: Book 1 (Paperback)
Too much about Blogging and Politics, not enough zombie action.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Much more enjoyable than "Feed", 30 May 2011
By 
P. Brooks "Peter Brooks" (Manchester, England.) - See all my reviews
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Mira Grant AKA Seanan McGuire really does raise her game in this follow up to "Feed", for those of you who enjoyed the techno babbling blogger shenanigans your out of luck as this one actually has a story to it rather the sordid quest for "audience/website hits" that seemed to be the driving force behind Georgia Mason the heroine of "Feed".
This story focuses on her Brother Shaun Mason and his quest to find his Sisters killer. Georgia is still in it but of course she is dead - sounds confusing but it really does work and is more more enjoyable for all that.

Still the odd thing niggles me is that it's 2041 but they seem to have exactly the same level of technology regarding computers as 2011? But hey it's only fiction and highly enjoyable Zombie fiction at that.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Context over content, 10 May 2011
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SonicQuack (Essex, UK) - See all my reviews
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The zombie genre is a crowded space and Mira Grant is determined to add a twist. The intended audience for Feed remains rather unclear, for it reads like an episode of teenage paparazzi show 'Press Gang' although it contains a complex and mature political storyline. The characters beyond Georgia Mason, the heroine, offer little extra which is disappointing since later in the book they are so important. The concept of bloggers in the near future being central to the world's communication and news network is the central idea in Feed and it's just not engaging enough for a future-tech backdrop. Feed is actually a detective story with zombies mostly on the periphery and barely sits in to the horror category at all. Disappointing, although readers will know what to expect should they head for the next book, Blackout.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The Book Geek, 12 Aug. 2011
Looks like I'm going to have to add this book to the list I call 'Popular books I can't appreciate' along with novels like The Lord of the Rings trilogy and Magic Bites. To all those goodreads members who loved this book - I tried, I swear I did. I finished a book that failed to grab my interest one bit right up to the last page, I have never forced myself to read 571 pages of a book that felt like wading through sludge. Perhaps I am not intelligent enough for this story, but whatever the reason, I've come away with nothing but relief that it is now over.

I won't give it 1 star, it is not a bad novel. The characters were varied and developed, the writing was sophisticated... but the story was just boring. Drab. Dull. I have mixed feelings about zombie novels; zombies themselves don't interest or scare me so there has to be something more to the story - this wasn't a problem. In fact, the book wasn't largely dedicated to flesh-eating and zombie moans, it was dedicated to something which I am very interested in and should have been what sold the book to me: politics.

I am a self-confessed politics nerd, I have been for a long time - probably ever since I was eleven reading Orwell's 1984 and discovering for the first time how politics could be used to create one hell of a fictional story. I was delighted when I read that the novel was more political than anything else. Ah, well, it wasn't what I expected. In fact, this novel is one very long, drawn-out presidential campaign that made me want to tear my hair out with boredom. I am very surprised that I finished the book at all.

I think I was waiting for a great pivotal change to occur about half way through - I've read several reviews saying that the pace picks up in the second half. I would say it does... marginally. I think other members obviously found a greater difference between the first and second halves that I didn't pick up on. It's difficult to say a novel is 'slow' to get going when I never really thought it did. Get going, that is.

I found Feed to be a novel that was too long, too dull and too concerned with technical mumbo-jumbo. I'm not a genius but I'm no idiot either and I can't believe that I could be the only one thinking "what on earth?" at all the medical lingo and weird descriptions of things that I'd never heard of. I like books that can be educational as well as fictional but if I don't know what the author's talking about I can't take anything away from the experience.

By about page 300 of this book, I would look at it on my desk and want to groan at the thought of picking it up again. I cannot imagine there would ever be any desire in me to pick up Deadline.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Internet versus The Undead - Part 2, 3 Jun. 2011
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Nothing stays buried for long...

Shaun Mason is a man without a mission. Not even running the new organisation he built with his sister has the same urgency as it used to. Playing with dead things just doesn't seem fun when you've lost as much as he has.

But when a researcher from the Centre for Disease Control fakes her own death and appears on his doorstep with a ravenous pack of zombies in tow, Shaun's relieved to find a new purpose in his life. Because she brings news: the monster who attacked them may be destroyed, but the conspiracy is far from dead.

Now, Shaun hits the road to find what truth can be found at the end of a shotgun.

Feed was hands down one of my favourite reads of 2010. It brought new life, if you'll pardon the pun, to the zombie novel. Pitched somewhere between The West Wing and Day of the Dead it was a terrific read and I have been looking forward to the arrival of it's sequel, Deadline, since I finished Feed's last page.

*Spoiler*

Since the death of his sibling, Shaun Mason has been going through the motions, merely surviving rather than living. He has been biding his time, waiting for the opportunity to track down the source of the conspiracy that ultimately led to Georgia being killed. Their website, After the End Times, has gone from strength to strength and Shaun finds himself in charge of a team who are all keen to help him learn the truth.

I always thought that dispatching the main protagonist toward the end of the first novel in a trilogy, was a rather gutsy move. Now, with the benefit of hindsight, I can see why it was the right thing to do. George is still a strong presence in Deadline, but only as a disembodied voice in Shaun's head. He has learned how to cope with her death by having an ongoing internal conversation with her. This back and forth nicely illustrates the distinct differences in their respective characters. All of Shaun's motivations are driven by George and her absence. He is uncomfortable with being in charge, and comes to rely on the spirit of his sister to fill the void she left behind. She helps him to continue to function and make the right decisions.

*End Spoiler*

Deadline seemed initially, to be a slower paced affair than it's predecessor. It takes more time to gather momentum due, I felt, to a distinct lack of zombie action in the first half of the novel. There were a few isolated incidents, but personally, I wished that there had been just a few more. However, now that I've finished the novel, I can see why the zombies had to take a back seat to begin with. This is a novel that is more concerned with revenge and conspiracy. Shaun is driven by his need for answers, and quite early on you get the feeling that things are going to get a damn sight worse before they get better.

There is a rather spectacular moment towards the end of the novel that caught me totally unawares. Kudos to Mira Grant for making me do a double take and exclaim "Whhhaaaat?!" (in the style of Moe the Bartender from The Simpsons). There is nothing I enjoy more than reading a novel and being thrown a truly unexpected curveball by the author.

Deadline is an intelligent, gripping read, with the same skilful writing that so engrossed me while reading Feed. If you are looking for zombie horror with brains, (sorry I couldn't resist) then this is the novel for you.

The good news is only a year or so till the final part of the trilogy, Blackout, is published. Who am I kidding - I am going to have difficulty waiting that long.
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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A hard slog about a blog, 5 Oct. 2011
I put in a lot of effort with this book. Although I found it mind numbingly boring, I pushed on through it as I actually believed that it would get better and that the shocking conspiracy that was promised in the blurb would actually materialise. I was wrong.
I don't know who this book is aimed at. The writing is rather childish, but I don't have a problem with that if it still manages to keep my interest, but it didn't. It goes into minute detail about blogging, internet sites, web traffic etc on such a regular basis that in the end I resorted to skim reading. At one point there is a whole narrative on the main character deleting spam from her email account. Spam is annoying enough at the best of times, but I don't want to have to read about it in a so called action thriller.

I could go on, but life is too short to waste time on a book so strangled by endless techno babble that any real story line is swallowed up by it and is never given the chance to develop or become exciting.

If you are a bit of a secret techie then this may be the book for you - otherwise avoid like the plague!
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This is not a zombie book!, 18 Feb. 2013
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If you found this book by checking through zombie and horror then chances are that's what you would like to read about so let me save you some time. This is probably the most boring book I have bought in a long time. It centers around George one of the most overly contrived heroines I've come across. This book is about how blogging is now the only truthful way people can get any news. George and her brother (the oh-so-whacky-and-wreckless type) go on a post zombie campaign trail for the US presidential election follow Senator Ryman. There are about 3 zombies in the entire book the rest of it endlessly drones on about Blogging and News and how our heroine has the zombie causing virus in her eyes- we are reminded about that on nearly every page. Even the boring politicial adgendas in the book made little sense- a rivial senator causing sabotage to Ryman's campaign. It's character's, especially George are a bunch of massive know-it-alls.
What really annoyed me was the sloppy way in which the author wanted to introduce her ideas of new technologies, George was born well after the virus had taken over the world yet she keeps on comparing the differnce between post and pre rising life, it's done in such a clumsy way it makes the novel very aware of itself...but by no means is that the story's only problem.
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Feed: The Newsflesh Trilogy: Book 1
Feed: The Newsflesh Trilogy: Book 1 by Mira Grant (Paperback - 7 April 2011)
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