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76 of 79 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A solid addition to the series
I have followed the adventures of Mma Ramotswe and the collection of colourful Botswana characters through the previous 12 volumes in the series, and was beginning to think that, with the latest two volumes in the series in particular, AMS was starting to run out of steam. So I'm delighted to report that Volume 13 is a very strong addition to the series.
Mma...
Published on 29 Mar 2012 by John M

versus
53 of 57 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A familiar dish?
Sometimes a familiar treat you have been looking forward to proves to be a little disappointing, somehow not so tasty as you remember it. It's still good, but somehow not the same. For me, "The Limpopo Academy of Private Detection" is a little bit like that. The appearance in person of Clovis Andersen, author of Mma Ramotswe's professional bible, "The Principles of...
Published on 30 Mar 2012 by Alun Williams


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76 of 79 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A solid addition to the series, 29 Mar 2012
By 
John M "John M" (UK) - See all my reviews
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I have followed the adventures of Mma Ramotswe and the collection of colourful Botswana characters through the previous 12 volumes in the series, and was beginning to think that, with the latest two volumes in the series in particular, AMS was starting to run out of steam. So I'm delighted to report that Volume 13 is a very strong addition to the series.
Mma Ramotswe finally meets Clovis Andersen, the author of the famous (or not so famous) 'Principles of private detection', and join forces to assist Mma Potokwani. Fanwell runs into a spot of bother with the law, and Mma Makutsi (or should I say Radiphuti)and her husband Phuti decide to have a house built.
This book is full of all the usual innocent charm, observational humour, and the typical dialogue to make the reader smile, which is the trademark of the series. And the tiny white van is still running too.
An excellent addition to the series and a return to top form. Fans of the series are sure to enjoy it!
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gentle Humour, 9 May 2012
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I agree with previous reviewers that the latest Mma Ramotswe offering is much better than the previous two in this long series. The gentle humour and simple storyline are a pleasure to read. Mma Makutsi is evidently getting ideas above her station now that she is married to a wealthy man, and the small jibes between herself and Mma Ramotswe are very amusing. highly recommended.
my only small issue is with the size of the hardback book. I have the whole series on my bookshelf, and this volume is larger than the others and the cover is from a different designer. I would have preferred all the books to have been the same size.
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53 of 57 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A familiar dish?, 30 Mar 2012
By 
Alun Williams "mathematician manqué" (Peterborough,England) - See all my reviews
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Sometimes a familiar treat you have been looking forward to proves to be a little disappointing, somehow not so tasty as you remember it. It's still good, but somehow not the same. For me, "The Limpopo Academy of Private Detection" is a little bit like that. The appearance in person of Clovis Andersen, author of Mma Ramotswe's professional bible, "The Principles of Private Detection", is a nice idea, and there is more happening than in some recent episodes: three of the long running characters run into trouble after getting involved with the wrong kind of businessman. Yet, despite at least one very enjoyable moment, courtesy of Charlie the apprentice, I cannot bring myself to give four stars this time around - 3.5 would be about right.
It is a long time now since I first discovered this series. Some people might wonder how a male Scottish author could write convincingly about African women, but I did find the early books very believable. Mma Ramotswe and Mma Makutsi both had enough troubles and weaknesses to seem real, and over the course of the series other characters came into the limelight from time to time, and moved the series on. This time, unfortunately, I felt that Mma Ramotswe, and particularly Mma Makutsi, were in danger of becoming parodies of themselves - the joke of Mma Makutsi's shoes talking to her has gone on more than long enough. I felt too that the baddies were so transparently bad that it was hard to believe that anybody could be fooled by them for a moment. Another minor annoyance is that Puso and Motholeli (the adopted children) were wheeled on for a page or two and then forgotten about. I am disappointed that Violet is once again an off stage presence. Overall I was left feeling that Clovis was introduced to spice up a dish that has been reheated too often. This book is less satisfying than the stews Mma Makutsi regularly prepares for Phuti.
I have bought almost all of this series in hardback, often on the day of release. Having come so far with it I'll probably continue to do so until the bitter end, but I do think it has gone on for too long now. There is a very confusing misprint on page 156, which I hope will be corrected in later printings.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another stunner!, 29 Jun 2012
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McCall Smith is a master in transporting his readers to Botswana....I've not set foot in Africa, let alone Botswana but, when I read the "No 1" books, I feel I know it so well. This series hasn't faded in my view.....the characters have developed beautifully over the series and I'm always impatient and eager to read the next one (will there be a next one??!!).
Can't get enough of them!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars wonderful as ever, 16 July 2012
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Jen 24 (Buckinghamshire, England) - See all my reviews
These are my favourite of the all the series McCall Smith writes, there is something so gentle and calming about them. The characters are wonderful and I like how the stories reflect philosophy of life. I enjoyed 'meeting' Clovis Andersen and the counting of how many cups of tea are drunk. Sheer enjoyment!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slow progress..., 9 Jan 2013
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J. Newell - See all my reviews
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Perhaps I have read too many books in this series, but I became bored with this. The conversations are so long drawn out, as if the author is struggling to find something for the character to say.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars deja vu, 16 Dec 2012
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I have enjoyed this series from the beginning especially the first 6 or so. This book continues in the same vein and, to be honest, I felt like I had read it before as this series has become rather formulaic and repetitive. Still an okay read but i think i know everything now about Precious Ramotswe and Co.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointed, 8 April 2012
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C. A. Brooks (UK) - See all my reviews
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Perhaps its the way it has been abridged that's the problem. It has all the makings of a good story but leaves you wanting more. Only 3 discs its usually 5 for these books. I'm going to have to read the book to see how much has been left out of this audio version.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars delightful, 16 April 2012
By 
Cloggie Downunder (Australia) - See all my reviews
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The Limpopo Academy of Private Detection is the thirteenth in the Number 1 Ladies Detective Agency series by Alexander McCall Smith. In this instalment, Mma Ramotswe and Mma Makutsi find themselves investigating not for clients, but rather, for themselves and their friends. Precious and Grace are delighted to find that Clovis Anderson, author of their much-consulted bible, The Principles of Private Detection, is visiting Botswana and decides to stop in for a chat. Precious uses the opportunity to get his advice on a troubling situation affecting her dear friend, Matron of the Orphan Farm, Mma Potokwani. It seems the Orphanage Board has decided to institute changes which Mma Potokwani feels will be detrimental to the orphans, and her dissension is to cost her her job. In an uncharacteristic move, the usually forthright matron retreats to her lands: is this the end for Mma Potokwani? Fanwell, the irreproachable apprentice at Tlokweng Road Speedy Motors, reluctantly agrees to help an old acquaintance and finds this decision has unforeseen serious consequences. While Mr J.L.B. Matekoni and Mma Ramotswe give him their full support, a surprisingly resourceful Charlie demonstrates unexpected loyalty and comes to the rescue. And newlyweds, Grace and Phuti, find that building a house can be complicated, especially when the builder is not completely honest. As always, the lives of our favourite Gabarone residents keep the reader engrossed; their dialogue, especially that of Mma Makutsi and even Puso, provide many light moments; Mma Ramotswe's inner monologue is full of gentle philosophy and it was a lovely surprise for the reader to meet the much-quoted (and apparently very human) Clovis Anderson. Another delightful novel, conveyed with consummate ease in the evocative voice of Adjoa Andoh.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The No 1 Ladies detective agency does it again, 25 Jun 2012
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Mrs. D. Patterson (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This series never disappoints. It's like slipping on a pair of comfortable slippers when you start to read the next book in the series and this the thirteenth does it again. All the familiar characters are there and one surprise new one. I loved it.
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The Limpopo Academy Of Private Detection: 13 (No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency)
The Limpopo Academy Of Private Detection: 13 (No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency) by Alexander McCall Smith (Paperback - 14 Mar 2013)
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