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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 5 July 2011
I was hoping for an interesting, fun overview of the aristocracy's impact on Britain over the last five hundred years. Instead, I found this book very uneven - some chapters are vividly written, well researched and full of the details that make social history come to life, and others are just a bewildering mishmash of names, opinions and summaries of other historians' work.

After a strong start, the book comes unstuck in the section on the Wars of the Roses, where it seems to take Shakespeare as a primary source. If I wanted a book about Shakespeare's history plays I'd have bought one. I was also disappointed that the chapter on the aristocracy in the twentieth century and the role of the House of Lords in a new millennium seemed so rushed.

Also, and it's a minor point, the index at the back of the Kindle edition is completely useless as it has no locations or page numbers.

I'm not sorry I gave this book a go, but I can't recommend it.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
A somewhat boring book which deals with the history behind the rule of the aristocracy and landed gentry here in the UK; I found it to be very dry, with little 'gossip' and way too much focus on the past; The cover suggests that you will have lots of info on modern day aristocrats, but only get one chapter on them, and even these selected few are dealt with in a very broad way.
If your after a decent, accurate, historical record of the basis here for the aristocracy than this is the book for you.
If your after a light, frivolous gossipy book than give it a pass!
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on 24 April 2014
Some years ago I read another book on the same subject ("Rise and fall of British Aristocracy").
I ordered this one expecting to find a fresher approach and possibly additional information.
Instead the book proved to be rather flat in my taste and quite simplistic.
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16 of 23 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 20 September 2010
Lawrence James, in his new book, "Aristocrats", takes a long look at the British aristocracy from 1066 to modern times. He examines the role the aristocracy has played in English history, society, governmental affairs, the arts, and warfare.

The aristocracy has held a middle place between English royalty and the common people. Great families were raised to aristocratic level - pointedly one layer under royalty - as a reward to helping the monarch in both war and peace time. Along with the Church, aristocrats were often the only members of society educated during the late middle ages and served their royal masters as government officials and representatives of the central government.
These families often fought among themselves for access at court - for continued royal favor. Great dynasties could flourish and often overwhelm a weak ruler. There was a constant balancing act between sovereign and the aristocracy over power. Royalty often married into aristocratic families and those families were particularly good at grasping at power. This has continued to present day; Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, was a member of high Scottish aristocracy when she married the future George VI. And, of course, Diana Spencer was from a wealthy aristocratic family.

Wealthy merchants and military officers were often given peerages as reward for their duties to the Crown. Old families died off and new people were ennobled, replenishing the aristocracy. James is particularly effective when writing about the social impact the aristocracy played in English life.

Aristocrats were often charged with running the various governments of the British Empire, as well as serving as high-ranking military officers. They were influential in importing the arts from countries on the Continent young men had seen on their "Grand Tours". The current aristocracy, made up of hereditary and life-peers, have staggered into the 21st century, their number being trimmed by war and death taxes. A stunning statistic, noted by James on page 368, was that "two hundred direct heirs to titles or major landed estates were killed between 1914 and 1918". For some reason, that number seems staggering to me.

Lawrence James is a lively, interesting writer. His book was a wonderful history.
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