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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Incredible - buy it now!
This is an amazing book - when I first saw it...I thought it would be just another vampire story - but never judge a book by its cover! The most memorable book I have ever read, it will make you laugh, cry, gasp and want more! It has gripped my interest both in gothicism and in Byron himself - both the man and the myth - and is surely a must for those who already find his...
Published on 28 Dec. 2002

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9 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars HORRIBLY WRITTEN AND PAINFUL TO READ
This is bad. Oh so bad! Lord Byron has a crash on maiden in distress by the name of Haidee and together they are trying to escape the big bad vampire, the Vardoulacha. They ride their horse and are chased by Haidee's family of vampires and her entire village of vampire zombies until finally they are caught and the poet is turned into a vampire. He then gets involved with...
Published on 12 July 2010 by Eleni


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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Incredible - buy it now!, 28 Dec. 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Vampyre: Being the True Pilgrimage of George Gordon, Sixth Lord Byron (Paperback)
This is an amazing book - when I first saw it...I thought it would be just another vampire story - but never judge a book by its cover! The most memorable book I have ever read, it will make you laugh, cry, gasp and want more! It has gripped my interest both in gothicism and in Byron himself - both the man and the myth - and is surely a must for those who already find his story fascinating. It chronicles Lord Byron's life, travels and relationships with a twist - his transformation into a powerful vampire - or vampyre - by an evil Pasha, and the changes it brings about, both good and bad. Erotic yet terrible, this is a book you won't forget in a hurry - believe me when I say that words fail me, you must read it for yourself. A literary treat not to be missed - I look forward to reading more Tom Holland soon!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A great Gothic novel, 10 Jan. 2014
By 
G. Napier - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Vampyre (Paperback)
A great Gothic novel, and indeed memorable. I read it ages ago, and recently found it rewarding to revisit (having read much more about and by Byron in the interim). An intriguing blend of fantasy and reality, with poignant episodes, mystery, horror, passion and drama. Very good characterization, both of sympathetic and villainous personalities. I am also fond of novels where the author demonstrates depth of historical knowledge. Holland's fictitious premise meshes so well with the real history that you almost wonder whether he might not have been on to something...
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4.0 out of 5 stars Byron: aristocrat, poet, vampire, 8 Oct. 2013
This review is from: The Vampyre (Paperback)
If you come to this on the back of Tom Holland's history writing, you'll be surprised. In this fiction book, Holland reinvents Lord Byron as a vampire. Byron relates his life to a woman who came looking for the missing autobiography - a touch of Interview With The Vampire - and Holland meshes the known facts of Byron's life with his life as a vampire - a touch of Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Slayer. It's cleverly done, but it has been done better elsewhere - the two books previously mentioned, for a start. A little slow to start but steadily improves throughout.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Changed my perception of fiction!, 30 Jan. 2013
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This review is from: The Vampyre (Kindle Edition)
Usually not at all a fan of fiction, more a fan of Holland's factual work. I can safely say however, after reading this that I have completely changed my perspective about the genre. A couple of reviewers rightly point out that it is not the most complex work to understand but that is what makes it so engaging. An easy to read, fun and intelligent piece of fiction... (i hope)..
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Damned to Everlasting Infamy, 4 April 2008
This review is from: The Vampyre (Paperback)
George Gordon, better known as Lord Byron, is one of England's most famous 'Romantic' poets. He was born in 1788, the son of John Byron and Catherine Gordon, but inherited his title and property of his great-uncle in 1798. He travelled extensively throughout Europe and Asia Minor - his trips abroad included Albania, Greece and Italy - particularly when he was in trouble at home. (He piled up debts, his marriage collapsed after little over a year and caused a great deal of scandal with a series of illicit love affairs - his romantic entanglement with his half-sister, Augusta Leigh, was particularly noteworthy. In fact, it is believed that Augusta's daughter was fathered by Byron, rather than by her husband). After his marriage to Anne Milbanke failed, Byron left England in 1816. He settled in Geneva for a while - where he became friendly with Percy and Mary Shelley - before moving on to Italy. In 1824, he sailed to Greece to help in their fight for independence from the Ottoman Empire. However, Byron caught and died from a fever before seeing any action.

"The Vampyre" tells Byron's life story, though from a slightly different angle. Byron, as it turns out, never actually died and the book sees him telling his story to Rebecca Carville. He covers what he feels to be the key period of his existence, beginning with the trip to Greece where he became a vardoulacha - a vampire - and finishing with his faked death in Greece. Although the story is (obviously) embellished, Holland clearly had done his research before writing this book. It features Byron's most notable love affairs, his friendships with John Hobhouse and the Shellys, even the feeble contribution of his rather pitiful doctor, Polidor. In all honesty, I enjoyed how Holland wove Byron's `real' life into the story more than the vampire angle...in fact, the thought of a vampire playing such a key role in the 'creation' of Frankenstein was something I found quite funny. All in all, a very readable story, though it won't necessarily keep you awake at night.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well-written and genuinely scary stuff!, 25 Sept. 1999
This review is from: The Vampyre (Paperback)
The theme might appear - and surely is - preposterous. But from the first page, the author leads you very persuasively through a series of vampiric events. The horror is used quite sparingly, but with considerable effect. The book is a pleasant change from the stereotypical Dracula-derived tale; Holland creates images which are genuinely scary and not easily forgotten.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great story, 10 May 2014
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Love this vampire story. Much better than most in this genre and hauntingly good by the end. A wonderful insight, into the fictitious mind of Lord Byron too.
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9 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars HORRIBLY WRITTEN AND PAINFUL TO READ, 12 July 2010
By 
Eleni - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Vampyre (Paperback)
This is bad. Oh so bad! Lord Byron has a crash on maiden in distress by the name of Haidee and together they are trying to escape the big bad vampire, the Vardoulacha. They ride their horse and are chased by Haidee's family of vampires and her entire village of vampire zombies until finally they are caught and the poet is turned into a vampire. He then gets involved with the Makri sisters of the prominent Athenian family, who are here presented as concubines, turns his friend and personal physician John William Polidori into a vampire, kills his daughter Alegra, befriends other vampires in Italy, apparently most of his friends were vampires, discovers that Haidee had been a vampire all along, and lives unhappily ever after, occasionally drinking blood in modern day London. Oh I forgot Byron in modern times goes by the name of Ruthven from Polidori's Vampire, and the past events take place near the Greek river Acheron, that leads to the underworld.

In total, a complete mess! A little bit of Polidori, a little bit of Hobhouse's recollections, some references to Greek mythology that make no sense at all, some references to the Greek War of Independence without any historical accuracy whatsoever, a dash of romance, a little bad sex, some blood and a great deal of childish talk about freedom, all that horribly written, and to think that it includes some quotes from Byron's verse, what audacity!

Read Lord Byron! Read Polidory if you will! Read any book on vampires you can find, just don't read this one. The only good thing I can think of is that it is kind of interesting to read, just so you can see how far it will go and how bad it will get.

And a note concerning the book's description; No, Lord Byron would never "have been pleased by such an eerie, erudite addition to his myth". He would have enjoyed a macabre story, the idea of immortality would have thrilled him, and undoubtedly he would love anything that would contribute to his myth as Mad Bad and Dangerous to know, but certainty he would be appalled by any piece of literature so badly written, that would make a mockery of everything he stood for in life.
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9 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Romantic and wonderful, 30 Jun. 2002
This review is from: The Vampyre: Being the True Pilgrimage of George Gordon, Sixth Lord Byron (Paperback)
When I picked up The Vampyre a few years ago I couldn't believe my luck. Lord Byron as a vampire? It all makes sense and this is definitly the story Lord Byron would have choosen himself.
Tom Holland delivers a story that feels waterproof. Everything's there in history and it's all correct in time and mind. I love this book and I urge every Lord Byron fan out there to read this. I don't agree this should be placed in "horror" it feels more of "history".
Wonderful and very romantic.
The myth lives on...
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding Read - A Cut Above, 10 April 2007
By 
V. Beddoes (Clent, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Vampyre: Being the True Pilgrimage of George Gordon, Sixth Lord Byron (Paperback)
This is my favourite book of all time! I am not usually attracted by the vast amount of vampire fiction that is available, however, the book was lent to me by a friend and I couldn.t put it down!! It is well written and Holland captivates his reader! The book seems to contain everything, humour, romance, thrills, Well worth buying!! I have had my copy for ten years and it never gathers dust!
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