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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dark Parody of Mary Webb and Stella Gibbons, 14 Jun 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The dark frontier (Fontana books)
The Dark Frontier is the debut novel of Eric Ambler, who contributed so much to the espionage and crime genres through such marvelous books as Background to Danger, Epitaph for a Spy, Cause for Alarm, A Coffin for Dimitrios, and Journey into Fear. Written in 1936, the book varies quite a lot from the rest of his work, and will be less satisfying to almost any reader. Serious Ambler fans, however, would be making a mistake if they passed up this book. Seeing this effort will help them appreciate the mature Ambler talent even more.
Most Ambler fans would do well to wait to read this one until they have read all the others, because it is clearly a lesser work for several reasons. First, it is an extreme parody of two popular English novelists that Ambler fans will undoubtedly not have read. As such, some of the pleasure of reading the parody is lost. Second, the book depends in part on Ambler's concepts of what might develop in weaponry after 1936. He did pretty well for his day, but not being surprised by the astonishing conjectures of "science fiction" element of the story also causes it to lose what was powerful color for contemporary readers. Third, the plot complications are not quite as delicious as those in the later Ambler works, and are intended to be pretty transparent as part of the parody.
That having been said, the sense of local color and suspense are strong and compelling. Mr. Ambler's story telling talents come through the parody quite well. I'm glad I read it, and I'm sure you will be too.
Make your efforts as timeless and universal as you can!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Conway Carruthers. international man of mystery, 6 Nov 2013
By 
Leonard Fleisig "Len" (Virginia Beach, Virginia) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Dark Frontier (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard) (Paperback)
Long before le Carre's George Smiley and Deighton's Harry Palmer there were Eric Ambler's accidental spies. In the 1930's the loosely defined adventure/spy genre was not much advanced from the earlier works of Erskine Childers and John Buchan Typically, Ambler would take an unassuming, unsuspecting spectator and immerse him in a world of mystery and intrigue in pre-World War II Europe. The result was a series of highly entertaining and satisfying books that many believe set the stage for the likes of le Carre, Deighton, and, most recently, Alan Furst.

Ironically perhaps, Dark Frontier (Ambler's first book) was not as much a departure from earlier works in the genre as much as it was a parody of those works. While reading Dark Frontier after having read Ambler's later stories it struck me that by this parody perhaps he sought out to destroy the genre before recreating it. A brief look at the outlines of the story lends some small weight for this assertion.

It is 1935 and Henry Barstow is an unassuming, unsuspecting English physicist on vacation in the English countryside. It is during this holiday that he happens to meet a gentleman calling himself Simon Groom who claims to be involved in the munitions industry. And does he have a tale to tell Henry. A small country in eastern or central Europe has successfully unleashed the power of the atom and is on the way toward creating an atomic bomb. (This in and of itself is an interesting plot twist as the idea of an atomic bomb seems quite prescient for an author writing in 1936). Groom tries to enlist Barstow's help in sabotaging the plans before the balance of power in the world is changed, and not likely for the better. Barstow laughs off the invitation and goes on his merry way. But soon enough he manages to bump himself on the head and after waking up in a concussed state believes that he is one Conway Carruthers, man about town and master spy. The rest of the book follows Barstow/Carruthers in a role best described as two-parts Walter Mitty and one-part Austin Powers. The result is a book that is two-parts entertaining and two-parts wholly unbelievable.

Dark Frontier is far from Ambler's best work. For him the best was yet to come. Yet at the same time it was enjoyable to read. The plotting was good (once you got over the bump-on-the head premise) and the story had enough twists and turns to keep me engaged in it. Ambler's prose can be very funny and the observations made by Carruthers as he careens from pillar to post in this eastern European quasi-police state were both funny and sometimes acerbic.

I heartily recommend this book to any fan of Ambler. Anyone who has read and enjoyed his later works will certainly derive some benefit to seeing where his writing life started in earnest. For someone new to Ambler I would not suggest you start here. I think if you start here you may not feel compelled to explore his other stories and that would be a great loss. Anyone who likes Alan Furst (amongst others should like Ambler) and I would suggest starting with any of the following, in no particular order: A Coffin for Dimitrios (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard);Epitaph for a Spy (Penguin Modern Classics); or Cause for Alarm (Penguin Modern Classics).
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dark Parody of Mary Webb and Stella Gibbons, 14 Jun 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Dark Frontier (Paperback)
The Dark Frontier is the debut novel of Eric Ambler, who contributed so much to the espionage and crime genres through such marvelous books as Background to Danger, Epitaph for a Spy, Cause for Alarm, A Coffin for Dimitrios, and Journey into Fear. Written in 1936, the book varies quite a lot from the rest of his work, and will be less satisfying to almost any reader. Serious Ambler fans, however, would be making a mistake if they passed up this book. Seeing this effort will help them appreciate the mature Ambler talent even more.
Most Ambler fans would do well to wait to read this one until they have read all the others, because it is clearly a lesser work for several reasons. First, it is an extreme parody of two popular English novelists that Ambler fans will undoubtedly not have read. As such, some of the pleasure of reading the parody is lost. Second, the book depends in part on Ambler's concepts of what might develop in weaponry after 1936. He did pretty well for his day, but not being surprised by the astonishing conjectures of "science fiction" element of the story also causes it to lose what was powerful color for contemporary readers. Third, the plot complications are not quite as delicious as those in the later Ambler works, and are intended to be pretty transparent as part of the parody.
That having been said, the sense of local color and suspense are strong and compelling. Mr. Ambler's story telling talents come through the parody quite well. I'm glad I read it, and I'm sure you will be too.
Make your efforts as timeless and universal as you can!
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dark Parody of Mary Webb and Stella Gibbons, 3 April 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Dark Frontier (Paperback)
The Dark Frontier is the debut novel of Eric Ambler, who contributed so much to the espionage and crime genres through such marvelous books as Background to Danger, Epitaph for a Spy, Cause for Alarm, A Coffin for Dimitrios, and Journey into Fear. Written in 1936, it was not published in the United States for several decades. The book varies quite a lot from the rest of his work, and will be less satisfying to almost any reader. Serious Ambler fans, however, would be making a mistake if they passed up this book. Seeing this effort will help them appreciate the mature Ambler talent even more.
Most Ambler fans would do well to wait to read this one until they have read all the others, because it is clearly a lesser work for several reasons. First, it is an extreme parody of two popular English novelists that Ambler fans will undoubtedly not have read. As such, some of the pleasure of reading the parody is lost. Second, the book depends in part on Ambler's concepts of what might develop in weaponry after 1936. He did pretty well for his day, but not being surprised by the astonishing conjectures of "science fiction" element of the story also causes it to lose what was powerful color for contemporary readers. Third, the plot complications are not quite as delicious as those in the later Ambler works, and are intended to be pretty transparent as part of the parody.
That having been said, the sense of local color and suspense are strong and compelling. Mr. Ambler's story telling talents come through the parody quite well. I'm glad I read it, and I'm sure you will be too.
Make your efforts as timeless and universal as you can!
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The Dark Frontier (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard)
The Dark Frontier (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard) by Eric Ambler (Paperback - 11 Dec 2012)
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