Customer Reviews


10 Reviews
5 star:    (0)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (5)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4.0 out of 5 stars bigswitch
turtledove continues to amaze in this science fiction series. as usual the characters stories are still interesting enough to keep you interested as with how the war is developing throughout.
Published 12 months ago by Aaron Wainyae

versus
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing and a dull read
SPOILER ALERTS

This is the third book in HT's new series and a series which started well with the first book - Hitler's War but has sadly quickly bogged down with HT's usual problem of lots of pointless conversations with lots of characters not really doing very much and this is true again in this latest offering - The Big Switch. For example a football match...
Published on 29 Aug 2011 by SJ SMART


Most Helpful First | Newest First

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing and a dull read, 29 Aug 2011
By 
SJ SMART "Smartie" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Big Switch (War That Came Early (Del Rey Hardcover)) (Hardcover)
SPOILER ALERTS

This is the third book in HT's new series and a series which started well with the first book - Hitler's War but has sadly quickly bogged down with HT's usual problem of lots of pointless conversations with lots of characters not really doing very much and this is true again in this latest offering - The Big Switch. For example a football match the German solider's play lasts 3-4 pages but I dont remember one battle or action scene lasting anywhere near as long.

As most of the other reviewers have pointed out that the big switch is that Britain and France make peace with Germany and then ally with her against the USSR (which I believe was one of Stalin's nightmares). Churchill is assassinated in an "traffic accident" probably by a German agent which helps make the change over possible.

Despite this major plot twist its a very dull book and despite some references to British and French troops being on the Eastern Front with the Germans we learn very little about anything that is going on there. Now in this story the USSR is facing Nazi Germany, Poland, Slovakia, Britain and France. I would have thought that this coalition would make a difference, be forcing back the Soviets at least a bit and create some really alternative history but all the characters are doing is complain about the cold, very stereotypical. Apparently the British dont have any cold weather gear is one remark I remember being made by a supposedly better equipped German soldier, the historical inaccuracy is horrendous sometimes. Perhaps its irony?

I do wonder why Turtledove bothers with these wartime scenarios since the wars, battles, etc play such a small and insignificant (and often badly told part) of his stories. He may as well just have a British person, French person, German person, Japanese person, etc. in peace time talk and talk and you would have exactly the same affect just a different date!

I really regret buying this book, very disappointed, have donated it to my local charity shop. I cant see this series improving now. I cannot recommend it.

For a REALLY good alternative history set in World War two I would recommend either Seelowe Nord: the Germans are coming. A completely fresh fictional new take on Operation Sealion - the German invasion of England in 1940, but the Germans land in the North east of England instead of the south. Very well written, full of action and very convincing or Guy Saviles -The Afrika Reich - really great reads unlike the above.Seelöwe Nord: The Germans Are Coming and The Afrika Reich
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Juvenile fiction?, 5 Aug 2011
This review is from: The Big Switch (War That Came Early (Del Rey Hardcover)) (Hardcover)
This is the 3rd book in HT's newest series, and I really do have to wonder. The level of historical accuracy is so appallingly bad this should probably be in his juvenile series.
It suffers from 2 huge problems.
First, he continues his technique of showing little disconnected snippets from various 'characters', who resemble a mixed set of cardboard cutouts which generate little or no sympathy. It also makes it far more difficult to work out whats going on in the war, which may be deliberate given the lack of any coherence in the war effort on any country involved.
Second, presumambly in order to 'shock' the reader, he comes up with an idea so daft I dont think anyone before has been arrogant enough to include it in a book. This is that the British and French (despite doing quite well in this war), suddenly decide they hate their ally (Russia) so much that they will instantly forget all the reasons they went to war, forget the fate of Czechoslovakia, Austra, Belgium, Denmark, Norway, and not only make peace with Germany (a possible outside chance if their governments both go collectively insane and the UK forgets 400 years of Continental war strategy), but ally with Germany and send their troops to fight with the German army!!
To believe this, one has to have the level of understanding of European prewar and wartime politics of..well, I cant think easily of anything so limited, to be honest.
Oh, and just to make it easier, the British government covertly assasinated Churchill to stop him complaining. With it kept a secret. Words fail me....

Turtledove used to write good books. Hes now descended into writing rubbish which gets published because of his name. Dont waste your money on this rubbish. Dont even bother when it comes out on paperback or in your local library. Sadly the system forces me to give it one star, it doesnt allow negative ratings.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing and a dull read, 22 Oct 2011
By 
SJ SMART "Smartie" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Big Switch (War That Came Early (Del Rey Hardcover)) (Hardcover)
This is the third book in HT's new series and a series which started well with the first book - Hitler's War but has sadly quickly bogged down with HT's usual problem of lots of pointless conversations with lots of characters not really doing very much and this is true again in this latest offering - The Big Switch. For example a football match the German solider's play lasts 3-4 pages but I dont remember one battle or action scene lasting anywhere near as long.

As most of the other reviewers have pointed out that the big switch is that Britain and France make peace with Germany and then ally with her against the USSR (which I believe was one of Stalin's nightmares). Churchill is assassinated in an "traffic accident" probably by a German agent which helps make the change over possible.

Despite this major plot twist its a very dull book and despite some references to British and French troops being on the Eastern Front with the Germans we learn very little about anything that is going on there. Now in this story the USSR is facing Nazi Germany, Poland, Slovakia, Britain and France. I would have thought that this coalition would make a difference, be forcing back the Soviets at least a bit and create some really alternative history but all the characters are doing is complain about the cold, very stereotypical. Apparently the British dont have any cold weather gear is one remark I remember being made by a supposedly better equipped German soldier, the historical inaccuracy is horrendous sometimes. Perhaps its irony?

I do wonder why Turtledove bothers with these wartime scenarios since the wars, battles, etc play such a small and insignificant (and often badly told part) of his stories. He may as well just have a British person, French person, German person, Japanese person, etc. in peace time talk and talk and you would have exactly the same affect just a different date!

I really regret buying this book, very disappointed, have donated it to my local charity shop. I cant see this series improving now. I cannot recommend it.

For a REALLY good alternative history set in World War two I would recommend either Seelowe Nord: the Germans are coming. A completely fresh fictional new take on Operation Sealion - the German invasion of England in 1940, but the Germans land in the North east of England instead of the south. Very well written, full of action and very convincing or Guy Saviles -The Afrika Reich - really great reads unlike the above.Seelöwe Nord: The Germans Are Coming and The Afrika Reich
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Harry has lost the plot, 30 April 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Big Switch (War That Came Early (Del Rey Hardcover)) (Hardcover)
I completely agree with all the other negative reviews, totally unbelievable, historically inaccurate, dull uninteresting characters etc. etc.

My other main gripe is the fact Turtledove continues to refer to the UK and it's armed forces as England/English, made all the more infuriating by the fact one of the leading British characters is Welsh!

I never intended to read this book, after finding the previous instalment suffered from a lot of the same issues, but someone decided to buy it for me, which is it's only saving grace.

I'm a big fan of Turtledove's earlier work, so I hope this is just a bad series and he will return to his usual good form in the future.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's a big switch, indeed!!!!, 14 Feb 2012
By 
J.Flood (Dublin,Ireland) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Big Switch (War That Came Early (Del Rey Hardcover)) (Hardcover)
The Big Switch is the third novel in this series. I am giving the book three stars as I did enjoy the parts of the story, that covered Soviet Union vs. Japan, and Germay/Poland vs. Soviet Union. However, the Big Switch element of the story, is a complete farce, and uttely implausible!! I could just about stretch believability(if that is a word) to a ceasefire between the countries involved, but the complete U-turn....ugh!!!! I plan to read the rest of the series to see how things turn out, maybe the author can make the 'U-turn' more believable!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A Truly awful book, 5 Nov 2011
By 
Mr. Paul Pimblott ""steve"" (newcastle, upon tyne, uk) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Big Switch (War That Came Early (Del Rey Hardcover)) (Hardcover)
Just to start id like to say that i have read most of turltedoves books and i have gotten used to relatively lazy writing and plotting but this book is so bad its unreal.. The premise is that Britain and France decide to join germany in fighting the soviet union despite the fact that they have spent at least a year fighting germany on french soil! This despite the fact that thousands of lives and countless millions of pounds/francs have been lost resisting a german invasion of france and the low countries..

ITS BEYOND PREPOSTEROUS.. It seems to me that he started this series without any idea on where its going or whats supposed to happen to its characters. Personally i believe that the publishers just went 'You can't write another series based on the second world war chronology AGAIN!'

DONT buy this book id give it to charity but i wouldn't want someone else to have to read its drivel!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars bigswitch, 7 Aug 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Big Switch (War That Came Early (Del Rey Hardcover)) (Hardcover)
turtledove continues to amaze in this science fiction series. as usual the characters stories are still interesting enough to keep you interested as with how the war is developing throughout.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Third book in a saga in which WWII started a year early, 29 July 2011
By 
Marshall Lord (Whitehaven, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Big Switch (War That Came Early (Del Rey Hardcover)) (Hardcover)
This is the third book in an alternative history series which speculates about what might have happened if World War II had started in 1938 after the failure of the Munich peace talks. This is going to be very much a "marmite" book which some people like and others hate: anyone who doesn't enjoy books which do not have the British as the "good guys" should probably avoid it.

The books in the series to date are:

1) "Hitler's War"

2) "West and East (War That Came Early)"

3) This book, "The War that came early: the Big Switch"

"The War that came early" is yet another alternative version of World War II from Harry Turtledove. It is quite astonishing that he can still find new perspectives from which to write about that war, but he does.

In the opening of the first book Turtledove made two changes in real history, and the first two volumes in the series work from there. First, in 1936 General Jose Sanjuro wasn't killed in a plane crash and consequently Sanjuro rather than Franco becomes leader of the Nationalist side in the Spanish civil war. Secondly, during the Munich negotiations, Henlein (leader of the Sudeten Germans) was assassinated, giving Hitler an excuse to press for even more punitive terms against Czechoslovakia.

In this history Chamberlain and Daladier finally recognised that Hitler was determined on war, and suspected that he had actually ordered Henlein's murder himself. They found the spine to tell Hitler that if he invaded Czechoslovakia, Britain and France would honour their obligations to the Czechs. Hitler did order the invasion of Czechoslovakia on the spot, and the war started a year earlier than in real history.

There was and is a commonly held view, at the time of Munich and subsequently, that the democracies were not ready for war in 1938 while Germany was. Many years ago my late father summarised this view in seven words when I asked why Chamberlain failed to stand up to Hitler at Munich: he answered "We would have lost the war then." My dad was a boy at the time but was accurately recalling the opinion of most of his elders.

This series is entertainment rather than a serious academic study, but the first two books tried to address the question of whether that view is right, by projecting through what might have happened, taking account of the fact that the lineup of countries on each side was not identical, of the state of preparedness of various nations, and of the military and naval kit which would have been available to the combatants in a war which began in 1938.

Both Britain and Germany would have been forced to make more use of armoured vehicles armed only with machine guns (Bren carriers and the Panzer I), or very light tanks such as the Panzer II: biplane fighters and bombers would have been used much more by all sides.

In real history, German war plans in 1938 for war against France were based on a slightly updated version of the Schlieffen plan which had been tried and failed in 1914. However, at the start of the war a copy of those plans fell into British hands. Knowing this, the Germans changed their strategy to the "Manstein Plan" for a punch through the Ardennes, and this strategy succeeded brilliantly and knocked France out of the war in 1940. In "Hitler's war" the Schlieffen plan was tried again with pretty much the results which most military historians think would have resulted if the Germans had been daft enough to stick with it.

By the start of this book the Germans have failed to secure the rapid victory against France which they actually achieved in 1940, and are slowly and painfully being driven back, though their armies are well inside French territory: in the East however, the Germans and Poles are gradually making progress against the Russians.

At this point Turtledove posits a further "What if" change in events from the real World War II - what if there were a change around in the pattern of alliances? Hence the title of the book.

Now if you were to ask me whether such an event would have been remotely likely I would have to say definately not. Particularly in the timeline proposed in this series, because some of the very same people who showed more spine in the first book "Hitler's War" than they did in reality, and were actually more willing to stand up to the evils of Nazism, diverge from historical events in quite the opposite direction in this book.

I also think this outcome is unlikely because some of the events in real history which reinforced British hatred of Soviet communism and nearly did lead to British and Soviet troops fighting one another - such as Stalin's invasion of Finland - were in this timeline forestalled by the earlier start to the war against Germany.

Having said that, there was an element within Britain and France, small minority though they were, who hated communism more than nazism and argued for a course of action similar to that which those countries take in this book. Which makes it a legitimate "what if" to ask provided you don't pretend it is a likely one. Turtledove also goes out of his way to recognise that there would have been many people in Britain and France who strongly opposed any rapprochement with Hitler.

As usual for a Harry Turtledove book, the war is seen through the eyes of a large number of fictional viewpoint characters, one or more from each of the countries involved. This time these include an American woman caught in Prague by the outbreak of war, who at the start of the third book is still trying to get home; a Jewish family in Munster; a German panzer wireless operator, infantryman, stuka pilot, and U-Boat skipper; British and Japanese sergeants; a Czech corporal who is now fighting with the free Czech forces in France; participants in the Spanish Civil War which in this history is still dragging on; a Russian Air Force pilot, an American Marine, etc.

The brother of the Jewish girl viewpoint character is hiding from the Nazis by having enlisted in the Wehrmacht under a false name, and in the second and third books Turtledove keeps us guessing about whether he is the driver of the Panzer II in which a Wehrmacht viewpoint character is radio operator. Major historical figures like Hitler and Churchill get mentions as they impact on the lives of the viewpoint characters.

Turtledove's homework on the tactical capabilities of equipment available to the armed forces of all sides between 1938 and 1940 is mostly pretty good, though he is open to challenge in a small number of cases. The main one in this book, continuing a storyline from the second volume, concerns the effectiveness of cannon-armed ground attack aircraft.

Both the Germans and Allies historically deployed ground-attack aircraft designed to destroy tanks. The Germans really did have "Panzerbuster" variants of the Stuka armed with 37mm guns, the JU87-G series, similar to the aircraft flown by a viewpoint character in this book, although it was not deployed in real history until much later in the war than it appears in these books. They had other anti-tank aircraft such as the Henschel HS129: the RAF deployed a Hurricane variant with 40mm anti-tank cannons, and later in the war used rocket-firing Typhoons.

But the main impact of such aircraft on enemy armour, whether they carried airborne anti-tank guns or anti-tank rockets, was to slow the enemy down and kill unarmoured targets: the majority of evidence suggests that they did not destroy large numbers of tanks.

Without the precision guidance systems developed later in the 20th century, or the ability to throw vast numbers of shells as the Gatling cannon on a modern A10 Warthog aircraft can, it was simply not possible to get the accuracy with air-to-surface weapons which was needed for a decent chance of destroying an armoured, moving target.

However, the psychological impact of being attacked from the air was considerable even for elite armoured units, and WWII air attack could and did cause devastating casualties to unarmoured targets like infantry, artillery, and supply units.

One famous incident where witnesses from both sides agree that air attack stopped an armoured assault cold took place at Mortain in 1944. RAF Typhoons and USAF P47s really did halt a major German thrust, but when investigated, their claim to have destroyed 200 enemy tanks was wrong by a factor of about twenty. A British military survey of the battlefield shortly afterwards found only 46 knocked-out German tanks and other AFVs, of which no more than nine had damage consistent with hits from the weapons deployed by Allied fighter-bombers: another seven tanks had been abandoned intact.

British investigators found that the vast majority of wrecked German AFVs had damage more consistent with hits from the weapons used by the American ground troops they were facing.

This absolutely does not mean that the air attack had no effect: all participants on both sides agreed that it had been a decisive factor. Interviews with captured prisoners confirmed that experienced panzer crews sought cover and some inexperienced panzer crews had bailed out when they came under heavy air attack. And for every tank knocked out by air attack, two or three support vehicles such as ammunition wagons and fuel tankers had been destroyed from the air.

The point I am making is that an undoubtedly SUCCESSFUL massed air attack had its impact through a dramatic effect on morale, causing armoured and unarmoured german units to take cover, through killing significant numbers of the infantry, artillery and support units essential to the armoured advance, and persuading nearly as many green panzer crews to abandon their vehicles as the number of tanks actually knocked out.

And NOT by directly killing large numbers of german tanks. Though, to be fair to the fighting men on both sides, the RAF and USAF planes did kill enough of the german AFVs to make it rational for the panzer crews to seek cover!

The JU 87-G1, the real historical aircraft most closely corresponding to the Panzerbuster Stuka in this book, carried six rounds for each of its two 37mm anti-tank guns. It came into being about three years later in real history than in this book, and was exclusively deployed on the Eastern Front, apparently because the Western allies often had air superiority and all Stuka variants were hopelessly vulnerable to Allied fighter planes. Most of its successes against Russian tanks were obtained by attacking Soviet tank columns from behind and penetrating their thinner rear armour. Turtledove does recognise in this book that the stuka was a sitting duck for allied fighters and refers to his viewpoint character making an effort to hit Soviet tanks from behind.

Nevertheless, the scenes in both "The war that came early: West and East" and this book in which an anti-tank stuka zips round above a battlefield swatting Allied or Russian tanks like flies, killing three or four targets per sortie without apparent regard to ammunition constraints or to the difficulty of actually scoring a hit, are not representative.

Assessing the accuracy of the book is complicated by the fact that Rudel, the stuka pilot in this section of the novel, appears to be based on a real historical figure with the same name who was the most decorated German serviceman of the war, really did fly JU-87 G variants in the last two years of the war, and was believed by the Luftwaffe to have destroyed a very large number of Russian tanks and other targets.

Yet ironically, the real Hans Rudel was originally regarded by his Luftwaffe bosses as not having the necessary skills to fly combat missions as a pilot, and they did not let him do so until Operation Barbarossa in 1941 - well after the dates when his fictional counterpart was flying combat missions in Turtledove's books.

We will never know for certain whether Rudel really destroyed anything like the hundreds of tanks that he claimed or whether his estimated number of kills was as badly overstated as the Allied pilots' claims after Mortain. But all witnesses including German ones agreed that the allied pilots really did stop the German attack at Mortain, while it is manifestly obvious that Rudel and his fellow anti-tank stuka pilots failed to stop the Russian army at Kursk or subsequently.

There is no convincing evidence that Luftwaffe air attacks were significantly more effective than Allied ones - if anything the reverse is the case - so even if Rudel really was as good as he claimed and Turtledove presents him as being in this book, there is no possible doubt that the average stuka pilot wasn't remotely as effective - thank God!

Mind you, the scenes in these books are only told from the Luftwaffe viewpoint, and perhaps like the allied pilots at Mortain the German pilot thinks he has killed more enemy tanks than he really has. Occasionally Turtledove gives both sides of the same battle and perhaps in a future book one of his soviet characters may be present when the panzerbuster stuka attacks and report that when the pilot thinks he has killed several tanks that in fact he has damaged one and driven the rest into cover.

I've gone into some detail about the effectiveness of WWII air attack because this part of the book seemed to give a false picture, below Turtledove's usual standard, but fortunately this is not typical of the quality of the techical and tactical analysis in "The big switch:" most of it is much better than that.

This is the fifth alternative version of World War II which Turtledove has written. He has previously done a series with aliens from Tau Ceti invading in 1942 (the "Worldwar" series which starts with Worldwar: In the Balance (New English library)). He's also done a parallel history following pretty much the real track, in a world where technology uses magic rather than engineering (known variously as the Darkness, Derlavi, or 'World at War' series) which starts with Into the Darkness. There is an alternative World War II in his massive ten volume history of a Confederate States of America which survives for nearly a century following a Rebel victory in the US Civil War, and in which the same roles as in the historical WWII are carried out by different people - this is the "Settling Accounts" quartet. Finally there is a pair of novels, "Days of Infamy" and "End of the Beginning" which explore the possibility that Japan might have backed up the air strikes on Pearl Harbour with a land invasion of Hawaii.

Having done so many alternative versions of World War II, you would think he would find it impossible to say anything new about them or maintain the reader's interest. There were some negative reviews of the first two book - mostly along the lines of "good concept, poor execution" and I suspect that not all readers will enjoy this as much as I did. One minor weakness is that, ironically, the viewpoint characters in this series somehow do not seem quite as "real" to me as those in the fantasy WWII series set in a magic world often did.

Turtledove also has a bad habit of repeating the same information time after time, and there is some of that in this series, from how hard machine-gunners often found it to surrender, to how junior enlisted men were wise not to argue with noncoms.

Overall I enjoyed reading all three books in this series and I think many Turtledove fans will likewise enjoy them, provided you will not be completely put off to find Britain and France allying with the Nazis. However, I didn't think this book was anywhere near as good as the first two in the series. If you're minded to try this series I would suggest that you start with "Hitler's war" and continue if you like that one.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars If you can't beat them . . ., 22 July 2011
By 
Mark Klobas (Tempe, AZ, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Big Switch (War That Came Early (Del Rey Hardcover)) (Hardcover)
Harry Turtledove's newest volume in his "War that Came Early" series picks up where his last book, West and East: The War That Came Early, left off with a war grinding on in the harsh winter of 1940. Both Germany and the Soviet Union find themselves facing two-front conflicts, and with the focus increasingly on the clash with each other, their leaders are willing to let go on the other front. For the Soviets, that means allowing Japanese triumphs in Siberia. For the Germans, however, a more radical move is attempted: convincing their opponents Britain and France to change sides and join the Nazis in their war against Communism. Yet as the prospects of an alliance grow increasingly likely, the question posed by Winston Churchill seems increasingly pertinent: can the proverbial lambs lie down with the Nazi lion, or are they just setting themselves up to be consumed in turn?

Longtime fans of Turtledove's alternate history novels will find much that is familiar within the pages of his latest book, as he describes the experiences of a cast of characters struggling to survive in a world where history takes a dramatic new turn. Yet the series does not measure up to his best efforts. The main flaw here seems to be one of characterization: unlike his Timeline-191 series, which offered a range of characters from different backgrounds and positions, nearly all of the characters in this series are enlisted men fighting in the war he described. This has the unfortunate effect of homogenizing the people and the action, as well as creating a similarity of perspective that limits his ability to offer exposition of the broader events that define alternate history. The problem is not without a solution - Turtledove has demonstrated in the past an ability to transition new characters into ongoing series - but he will need to do so soon or face squandering the effort he put into developing his latest alternate world.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars want to see more, 9 Nov 2011
This review is from: The Big Switch (War That Came Early (Del Rey Hardcover)) (Hardcover)
this book has gotten some bad reviews which I dont understand, I admit turtledoves writing style can be a bit confusing, and I admit I cant see chamberlain allied to hitler, but that is why it is called alternate history, and turteldove has always had the writing style he exhibits in this book. Personally I dont find it confusing. I just loved Vlaclav Jezek and his sniperrifle want to hear more about him. Hans Ulrich falling in love is complicated, and I am looking forward to alistair walsh's military coup.
I am probably going to buy the next book if nothing else to see how Turtledove will get himself out of this one.
I dont regret buying this one either, but I can easily see that if you dont like Turtledoves writing style it would seem annoying, and the earlier two books are probably a little better than this one, but i like it anyway.
Turtledove please continue.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Big Switch (War That Came Early (Del Rey Hardcover))
The Big Switch (War That Came Early (Del Rey Hardcover)) by Harry Turtledove (Hardcover - 15 Aug 2011)
10.28
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews