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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A moving, sweeping, dark masterpiece of literature
The Vampire Lestat is not only one of the most engaging, remarkable, illuminating, and important horror novels ever written, it is a beautiful work of art that stands proudly among the ranks of what I define as great literature. The breadth and scope of this novel is almost staggering, as is the hypnotic language in which every word and phrase is uttered. Interview With...
Published on 1 Aug 2003 by Daniel Jolley

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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars One bite too far
I purchased this book as I had been so enthralled by 'Interview with a Vampire' and the frankly fascinating character of Lestat. He is without regret in his slaughter yet attractive to his victims, he is intelligent but brutal, he is a vampire filled with life as well as blood.
Parts of the book live up to the first novel in the series as he wanders around Paris and...
Published on 5 Jan 2003 by Elizabeth Taylor


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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A moving, sweeping, dark masterpiece of literature, 1 Aug 2003
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
The Vampire Lestat is not only one of the most engaging, remarkable, illuminating, and important horror novels ever written, it is a beautiful work of art that stands proudly among the ranks of what I define as great literature. The breadth and scope of this novel is almost staggering, as is the hypnotic language in which every word and phrase is uttered. Interview With the Vampire was provocative and soul-stirring, but its greatest achievement pale in comparison to the least of the many wonders worked into this second volume of Anne Rice's Vampire Chronicles.
It was the story of Claudia the vampire child that touched my heart in the first novel, although the moral and philosophical questions asked by Louis opened the door for a new kind of vampire literature. Still, Lestat hovered and brooded over every page of Interview With the Vampire, leaving nothing but unanswered questions in the wake of his coldness and sometimes pathetic manifestations. One could not help but wonder about his origins and history, the heavy weights of his mysterious life having left him little more than a husk of a vampire at the end of Louis' story. Finding out in the opening pages of The Vampire Lestat that this inscrutable wanderer is not only thriving once again but that he has in fact become a rock star seems pretty strange. Yet all things are made clear in this novel, for this is Lestat's story, and he violates every vampire law by revealing secrets beyond the ken of mortal man. Lestat wants to embrace his true nature, show the world's population that vampires live amongst them, and incite a glorious war between man and the Children of the Night.
This is much more than just Lestat's story, however. What Anne Rice has managed to do in this novel is to create a brand new history and legend of the vampire, taking this most beloved of horror themes and transcending the literature of Stoker, Le Fanu, and the greats of the past. The cold and inscrutable Lestat we saw in Interview With the Vampire is now revealed to be at one time the most human of vampires, an immortal whose love for humans exceeded even that of his creation Louis. We learn of his human childhood, his creation by the immensely old and powerful Magnus in the seventeenth century. The depth of his feelings for his mother and adolescent soul companion Nicholas are quite touching and beautiful, and we see how his first recipients of the Dark Trick come to bring him much pain and tragedy. We see his crazed outbursts and intensity of feeling revealed in the most telling of ways. We learn much more about the vampire Armand, a character I quite honestly despise for his weakness. He hides behind old traditions, betraying the very notions of his own creator Marius by embracing a pseudo-religion of evil, punishing those wretched creatures who dare disturb his antiquated way of existence. Marius, an ancient vampire of great power who links Armand and Lestat together in the most telling of ways, introduces Lestat and ourselves to the Mother and the Father, Those Who Must Be Kept, and it is through these individuals that the history of vampirism is delivered so originally and brilliantly here, drawing and touching upon ancient Egypt, religion, philosophy, and a myriad of other powerful subjects and inspirations. Through Lestat's daring and individualism, we learn much more than any other vampire teacher could tell us; he truly did have stories to tell, and now we learn why he refused to share his wisdom with Louis and Claudia.
The introduction of the Mother and the Father, Akasha and Enkil, leads us directly into the next book in the series, The Queen of the Damned, and The Vampire Lestat actually ends on a note of new beginnings potentially more powerful than anything introduced and revealed in this book's 550 pages. I find Those Who Must Be Kept absolutely fascinating, the most ancient of vampires who live lives of immobility and seeming inactivity, staring open-eyed eternally, leaving open the possibility to Lestat in particular that they can be reawakened. Yet Lestat's active plans, his flagrant announcement to the world that he is a vampire (even though mortals may believe in the image rather than the reality of what he is saying) and his daring publication of the most secret of his kind's secrets leaves one spellbound and in wonder as to how things will play out in the end. His actions are rash and dangerous, yet the exuberance he feels in doing these things brings him to life ever more fully. I could go on and on about the wonder and power of this novel, but even then I could not begin to convey the beauty and force with which Anne Rice weaves her dark wonders. Anne Rice takes us inside the hearts and minds of these vampire characters, and that is a perspective that even Bram Stoker never provided. I thought nothing could possibly surpass the dark brilliance of Dracula, but I have to say that The Vampire Lestat is the greatest vampire novel I have ever read.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you thought Interview with the Vampire was good..., 6 Aug 2001
By A Customer
Anyone who has read Interview with the Vampire or who saw the film knew that there was something special. Anne Rice has somehow managed to make Vampires loveable by us mere mortals. They are no longer the blood-thirsty savage killers that we always presumed them to be but elegant, civilised immortals who long for human affection as we long for immortality.
In this book you discover the true Lestat, rather then the abnoxious, uncaring brut portrayed in the first book. Here Lestat answers the questions that we desire to know like How was Lestat made? The history of Armand? Is Armand the eldest Vampire? Where do the Vampires originate from and even How was the Theatre de Vampire's formed? All these questions are tackled and a short glimpse into the after Interview with the Vampire is shown with a shocking ending that leaves you with one thought, "Where can I buy 'Queen of the Damned'?"
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lestat is the ultimate anti-hero, and totally loving it., 3 Dec 1999
By A Customer
This was the first Anne Rice book I read and seeing as it was enough to drive me through reading atleast 10 more, that says something about its strength. I doubt if I'd made the mistake of reading Interview with the Vampire first, I'd have been this hooked ( the film, in this case, is actually better than the book).
The story takes you through an entire life, one spanning several centuries and numerous cultural revolutions. Such an extravagant backdrop is the only thing worthy of a larger than life and death protagonist like Lestat. He is truly driven, passionate, confounding, melodramatic but surprisingly incisive. He does the unforgivable, yet his contrition is greater than any condemnation you can give him, and so you do forgive him because you can't not. There are very few characters in English literature as charismatic as this one - with his fierce intelligence and concern for everything and nothing. Not only does he bring glamour to Vampirehood, but he makes your revere the mortal condition too. Everything sparkles - the endless cast of characters, the scenery, the concepts. It opens your mind to a whole new way of thinking, has more than enough logic to establish its own cult - if Lestat wasn't so dedicated to being damned. Only 'the Tale of the Body Thief' even comes close to reviving the same marvel with which you regard such an impossible character. Engrossing, compulsive and unforgettable.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Entrapment, 11 Sep 2004
By 
Ms. J. Brooks "Jaz Design" (Surrey, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I was lost to the *real* world when I had my head in this book.
For those of you who scoff at "supernatural" ideas, I wouldn't recommend this book to you unless you come to it with an open mind. Although I know the content isn't true, I think you would find it very difficult to lose yourself in such a story with a closed mind. And that's what the story wants, to swallow you whole, at least until you run out of pages...
I have read many books and am currently munching my way through the rest of the chronicals, and though I understand from a critic's pov this wouldn't be named one of the greatest books of all time, I still think it is :)
There are very few authors who I have read that have managed to make me feel so much compassion for a character, however Lestat (though evil) totally inspired me! The way Rice portrays him is very powerful, I challenge you not to find the "damnedest creature" lovable in some way or other.
There are lots of unexpected occurances and plot twists to keep you on your toes, and the questions left unanswered in IWTV are answered throughout.
I believe I enjoyed this slightly more (but only very slightly, I love Louis and his story too) than IWTV and I'm not so sure you need to have read Interview With The Vampire to enjoy this. Though there is a short section at the end dealing with the continuation.
Lastly I hope you will enjoy this book should you choose to read it. I recommend it 100% and am very glad I took the time to read it.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Probably the best contemporary Gothic novel I've ever read, 5 Nov 2003
By 
Amanda Pike (Bellmore, New York) - See all my reviews
I think I was fourteen-years-old when I realized I liked Anne Rice's The Vampire Lestat. I had an obsession with vampires and Gothic horror in general. And I found out about the novel Interview with the vampire. So I read that novel in the course of one weekend. At the back of the book it advertised The Vampire Lestat. And I was delighted. I wanted to know his side of things. I believed he had a story to tell. It seemed obvious to me from the little hints in Interview with The Vampire. And I was absolutely delighted with Lestat and his rock persona. At the time I was also just getting in to David Bowie. And I saw a comparison to Ziggy Stardust and Lestat. Lestat- a vampire pretending to be a rock star pretending to be a vampire. And David Bowie's Ziggy Stardust- A rock star pretending to be an alien, pretending to be a rock star pretending to be an alien.
I was in love. And it wasn't the 'charisma of the undead' so get that idea right out of your heads. I don't usually find vampires very sexy. To be honest, the brooding, byronic vampires bore me.
I loved Lestat's rebellion. I loved his angst. I loved his passion. I loved his inability to be discouraged for very long. I loved his optomistic nature, his unwllingness to accept defeat, his strength, his stamina, his faith in the value of goodness (though he sees himself as evil and doesn't much complain about it the way Louis did). I loved his human questioning, which was handled very differently than Louis' brooding. I loved his need to escape and it's realization when he went to Paris. I loved his sensuality. His passion. It wasn't the fangs or the blonde hair, I loved the antagonistic, angst ridden brat who was loyal to those he loved but also mischevious, nevertheless. I felt a connection to him. A vampire Glam Rock musician- basis for Goth culture. Replacing the old cliche of the cape and castle with a leather jacket and motorcycle. I had wondered where the modern vampire style had come from!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The most alluring vampire of them all., 10 May 2002
I have to say that I was blown away. Completely blown away. Utterly.
I'm a 23 year-old male who's favourite reads are the kind churned out by Chuck Palahniuk (Fight Club) and Bret Easton Ellis (American Psycho), so needless to say I was a bit sceptical when a friend recomended - what i thought was - a 'romantic, gothic horror/vampire novel'.
And i have to admit that I was completely and utterly surprised, absorbed, hooked, and in total admiration for the character 'Lestat'.
Anne Rice writes with such beauty and lucidity that you can't help but emphasise Lestat, and though he can often be cruel and erratic, he is easily one of the most charming, amazing characters I've ever read of. I was so astounded that on finishing the book, for a moment I wanted him to come and turn me - sad, I know, but that was it's charm.
Rice creates an enchanting world, bringing us right the way from post revolutionary France to the late 80's where Lestat has transformed himself into - perfectly in context for the modern way of life - a rock-star!!! Brilliant!!
The only thing that prevents this from getting 5 stars is that sometimes the passages are too descriptive.
I want to be a vampire!!! (joke)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best book I read........ and in only 3 hours., 2 July 2000
By 
psychoford@aol.com (From a place where I am always watching you !) - See all my reviews
I picked up this book straight after I finished interview with the vampire, and at midnight, I read the first page. By 1 miniut past I was hooked. After getiing to the end I realised how much I had laughed and cried and wished I had been their my-self. It has so much pain inside, that you wonder where it all comes from! A book that the whole world should read to gain so many valuble lessons. It is pure goodness. Oh!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ever thought you'd sympathize with a "monster"?, 7 July 2000
By A Customer
Lestat was not always a vampire, consuming mortal victims and intimidating Louis. In his story, we find Lestat's tortured past and get to know him in a way that makes him seem like our best friend.
Lestat was a boy in the 18th century and had a disfunctional family. Not enriched by village life, he pursues happiness in Paris and it is there that he meets his end - and his beginning.
"Lestat" is a masterfully told tale that immerses the reader into a tangible world of decadence and desire - immortal style. This second in the Vampire Chronicles series is even richer than its predecessor, Interview With the Vampire. It leaves us with the feeling of just having had a particularly powerful and realistic dream.
I highly recommend this book. If you take my advice, The Vampire Lestat will soon take a position of prominence on your bookshelf.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It will keep you reading for hours, 1 May 1999
By A Customer
The vampire Lestat in back in style! Lestat is stagestruck. He has come back as a rock legend. He serches for the secret of his past. Anne Rice has done it again. She really captures the essence of each chacter to make it a wonderful read. I read this after I had 'Interview with the Vampire.' So if you want something good to read, read this.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The ONLY Vampire novel, 10 Feb 2006
Anne Rice's amazing character Lestat comes vividly alive in the second and best enstalment of the Vampire Chronicals with all the beauty and savagery of a phoenix rising from the ashes. Her amazing narative as Lestat leaves you feeling wrung out with emotion as he tells his story of how he was made and all the pain and inner turmoil that came with the first few centuries of his life as a child of darkness. The passion of his creating companions over the years and his search for knowledge of his nature and others of his kind is such a relfection of the human search for love and answers, I really think Rice has a deep understanding of psychology.
Rice captures perfectly how tortured the human soul can be so that everyone can relate to Lestat who is in turn as monstrous and inhuman as he is compassionate and complex.
Some of the scenes have had me in tears such is the intensity of them.
A must read if you love vampire novels as this is the ultimate and the only one you'll ever need, but beware you might just loose your heart to the vibrant, tortured, cruel and beautiful Lestat in the process and never quite be the same again.
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The Vampire Lestat (Vampire Chronicles)
The Vampire Lestat (Vampire Chronicles) by Anne Rice (Mass Market Paperback - Aug 2004)
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