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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another fantastically different adventure for Thursday Next
Book seven in the Thursday Next series once again takes the random-fantasy/crime/met-fiction in a different direction. Thursday has a new job with new responsibilities, and is struggling with her children, one of whom doesn't exist.

As usual with Jasper Fforde's writing it's a fantastic mish-mash of thrilling adventure and literary puns. I don't know whether...
Published on 16 July 2012 by J. R. Johnson-Rollings

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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Is it time for Thursday to retire?
For the first few chapters, I feared that this was going to be the same lacklustre stuff as #6, as an injured Thursday attempts to get a job as head of the newly reformed Spec Ops-27 in the teeth of opposition from young, fit Phoebe Smalls, who wants to be like Thursday, only better. Meanwhile, the Almighty has taken to smiting cities and Swindon is next on his schedule...
Published on 14 July 2012 by S. B. Kelly


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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another fantastically different adventure for Thursday Next, 16 July 2012
By 
J. R. Johnson-Rollings (West Midlands, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Woman Who Died a Lot (Thursday Next) (Hardcover)
Book seven in the Thursday Next series once again takes the random-fantasy/crime/met-fiction in a different direction. Thursday has a new job with new responsibilities, and is struggling with her children, one of whom doesn't exist.

As usual with Jasper Fforde's writing it's a fantastic mish-mash of thrilling adventure and literary puns. I don't know whether they've toned down a bit or my own experience has widened, but I felt that the references were more approachable than in some of the earlier novels where I knew I was missing most of them.

There are some excellent passages in this story, particularly the way that Fforde deals with the mindworm. The narration, from Thursday's point of view, is superb and presents an intuitive view of the world that tells the reader everything while managing not to realise things herself. This leads to the one plot hole that stands out, where she narrates things she shouldn't know.

I really love Jasper Fforde's novels and can't get enough of them. Reading 'The Woman Who Died a Lot' has encouraged me to go back and re-read the earlier Thursday novels. A definite must-read series for anyone who loves a bit of slightly-surreal comic fantasy.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'Proper' Thursday Next!, 13 July 2012
By 
H. Whitehead (England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Woman Who Died a Lot (Thursday Next) (Hardcover)
I would love to know what exactly powers Jasper Fforde's imagination. Not only has be produced four different series of completely unique and absurd books, this is the seventh and latest book in the Thursday Next series and it's just as imaginative as ever. In addition to creating a fully-functioning world inside books (complete with the JurisFiction policing agency and grammar-stealing beasts), but the world that 'real' Thursday Next lives in is just as filled out.

It's especially great that the author takes little snippets of our real lives and tweaks them to fit into the book. TK Maxx, for example, isn't just a designer label outlet store, it's also a time-loop containment facility where dangerous prisoners are kept, condemned to spend eternity stuck in a dentist's waiting room or waiting for their girlfriend to finish trying on clothes.

This world is also a lot more literary-obsessed than our own - television and all the various gadgets still exist, but books are a much more prominent feature. I love the Marlovian preachers in the earlier books - they traipse from door to door, preaching about how Kit Marlowe was the true author of Shakespeare's works. The Woman Who Died A Lot is no different - the Swindon in this book has its own share of literary asides.

I do wish that there had been more BookJumping in this book - it's what One of Our Thursdays Is Missing suffered from. Mind, at least this book talked about the BookWorld a lot - you do learn more about its functionality and Golaith's secret interest in it. It's just not the same without the occasional literary character popping up though - where are Mrs Tiggywinkle and Emperor Zhark!?

Still, although the plot is real world-based, it's a remarkably good one. Goliath are back to their old tricks and SpecOps has been reformed so there's plenty to keep us entertained. It's fast paced and unique - god knows how Jasper Fforde hasn't repeated a plot point in seven books, but it's true.

I just didn't want this book to end - while reading I was constantly aware that I wouldn't have any unread Thursday Next books! I kept putting it down to savour it just that little bit longer. I can't wait for the next one, the title of which has already been announced as Dark Reading Matter. It doesn't sound like there will be much BookJumping in this one either, but I can always hope!

I just adore these books. If Jasper Fforde ever definitively writes an end to this series, I will literally cry. They're inventive, bookish fantasy for grown-ups, as well as producing that great little "Ah!" moment when a character from a classic novel you've read pops up to say hello.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Is it time for Thursday to retire?, 14 July 2012
By 
S. B. Kelly (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Woman Who Died a Lot (Thursday Next) (Hardcover)
For the first few chapters, I feared that this was going to be the same lacklustre stuff as #6, as an injured Thursday attempts to get a job as head of the newly reformed Spec Ops-27 in the teeth of opposition from young, fit Phoebe Smalls, who wants to be like Thursday, only better. Meanwhile, the Almighty has taken to smiting cities and Swindon is next on his schedule. Thursday's genius daughter Tuesday is trying to create an anti-smoting device, but is there enough time? Son Friday has lost his possible future in the Chronoguard with the closure of the programme and been given a troublesome one in its place.

Then there are the Blyton fundamentalists, who not only want Enid's books restored to their original, un-updated text, but want society restored by those criteria too, and the asteroid, whose chances of collision with the earth seem to rise daily.

Sadly, although this is much better than #6, the glory days of Lost in a Good Book or The Well of Lost Plots seem far away. There are some nice touches, such as the insane staff at Thursday's new job, the homicidal nun and the shifting of Aornis's mindworm within the family but, in the absence of any forays into the Bookworld, it doesn't add up to enough.

If you are new to Thursday Next then please don't start here. The books really need to be read in order, starting with The Eyre Affair.

I see that fforde has already committed himself to #8 but think that it's probably time to retire Thursday Next. I'm looking forward to the sequel to Shades of Grey.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars fford the imagination, 21 Feb 2013
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Fforde has an imagination like no other, even Pratchett, and it comes through fine in this book, but at times I did find it a bit hard going at times and is not the best of the series but I did get rewarded for sticking with it. Still funny, still exciting but something wad missing I felt. Maybe I'll find it in the D R M zone
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Refreshingly different and funny, 2 Sep 2012
I had read none of his books before and so had no idea what to expect. I was caught up in the sheer exuberance of the radical shift in perspective that his world conjures up and I have to admire his imagination. This book also made me laugh which I feel earns it an extra star by itself. I suspect that if you are a Pratchett fan then this author will appeal and I certainly reccommend this book to you.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Still enjoying them, 31 Aug 2012
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This review is from: The Woman Who Died a Lot (Thursday Next) (Hardcover)
I was worried that I might not enjoy this one so much as I didn't like the 6th book so much but I really enjoyed it and thought it was back on form. In face without putting in any spoilers there was a bit that brought a little lump to my throat and I wasn't expecting that. Well worth reading and I am actually looking forwards to book 8 although I bet I have to wait a while!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it!, 29 Aug 2012
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This review is from: The Woman Who Died a Lot (Thursday Next) (Hardcover)
I have read and re-read all of Mr Ffordes books as he is one of my favourites authors, and I LOVED this new Thursday Next adventure (much better than TN 6). I think one of the things I loved most about it, and about all the TN books, is how real and human he makes Thursday. She is not your typical heroine!

Excellent book Mr Fforde, please keep writing them!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jasper at his best!, 10 Aug 2012
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superl99 "superl99" (Cincinnati, Ohio United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Woman Who Died a Lot (Thursday Next) (Hardcover)
Jasper is absolutely back to his best in 'The Woman Who Died a Lot'! Goliath hijinks, illegal clones, mind worms, and a slight problem with a smite-happy deity all make this one of the best books in the TN series in my opinion. Book World lovers beware, there are only brief mentions of the Book World in this one, but worry not! That does not detract at all from the crazy fun of this story, and the next TN book looks like it will be very Book World-centred. If you're a Jasper fan, definitely buy this book! If you're not, what's wrong with you?!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as the previous, 25 July 2012
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Having read all of Jasper Ffordes previous books, I was disappointed with this latest offering. The book felt rushed and lacked so much that made the previous Thursday Next books good. There is no foray into Bookworld and the plot is a little thin this time.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All set in alternate Swindon, shame the BookWorld only gets a mention, 12 July 2012
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This review is from: The Woman Who Died a Lot (Thursday Next) (Hardcover)
Following on from the events at the end of the previous adventure, in which she only featured briefly toward the end, the real Thursday Next is licking her wounds. One of her legs (not arms, as suggested above) hasn't healed properly and she's hooked on painkiller patches.

As if that's not bad enough, God has made a surprise return to the world and has announced that on Friday, Swindon's due for a smiting. Tuesday, Thursday's genius of a daughter, has to try and make the anti-smiting shield work before then or downtown Swindon is going to be history.

Meanwhile, after the exisentional collapse (of sorts) of time travel, the ChronoGuards were disbanded. Those who would have been ChronoGuards have all received letters saying what their lives in the ChronoGuard would've been like - and how they'll turn out instead. Unlucky for Friday, Thurday's son, his letter says he's going to murder someone. This week.

To top it all off, SpecOps are being reinstated to get rid of the stupidity surplus, someone's destroying old manuscripts, Aornis Hades is on the loose and Thursday keeps finding she's not herself. It would have been easier to just sit back and let time run its course, but if she did that, she wouldn't be Thursday Next ...

I was overjoyed to hear there was a new Thursday Next book coming out so soon after the previous one, and poured over this one with ill-concealed glee. As I love the whole concept of the BookWorld, I was a little disappointed with "The Woman Who Died a Lot", because while there's a fictional character who works for her, and they're trying to get inside the elusive Dark Reading Matter, Thursday never ventures into the BookWorld. I suppose this is how people who prefer the alternate Swindon probably felt after "One of Our Thursdays is Missing", which was set nearly exclusively in the BookWorld.

What I like about these books is that they're so imaginative and while they're an insane rollercoaster, they're also funny and mindbending in just that sort of way that makes you feel really clever. Needless to say, this is another great story from Mr Fforde, and if it had had a little more BookWorld in it, it would have been even better. Which is a bit strange to say, considering this novel is a great example of why people who don't read need to get into reading. It exercises the imagination and keeps in tip-top condition, better than any film could ever hope to achieve.
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The Woman Who Died a Lot (Thursday Next)
The Woman Who Died a Lot (Thursday Next) by Jasper Fforde (Hardcover - 12 July 2012)
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