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4.1 out of 5 stars
Made in Sheffield: Neil Warnock - My Story
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 29 August 2007
Whilst I can understand the criticism levelled by previous reviewers about Warnock's inability to criticise himself, I found my generally positive view of him confirmed and increased by the book. I think being a football manager requires a huge amount of self-confidence, and he certainly has that in spades, which inevitably means that analysing where he went wrong does not come naturally. Nonetheless, when you read this and look at how much he achieved with little or no money at clubs like Scarborough, Notts County, Plymouth and even (relative to other clubs of similar stature) Sheff. Utd., you can understand why he feels he should have had the chance to work at bigger clubs.

As a Blades fan, I'm grateful for his achievements, and whilst there may have been failings on his part in the relegation season, I honestly believe the club was discriminated against in the Tevez affair. It's the last section dealing with Warnock's time at Bramall Lane that I naturally found most interesting, and there are plenty of insights into behind the scenes incidents and personalities, with his clashes with other managers particularly entertaining.

As you would expect, Warnock is not afraid to criticise anyone, from refs to players to managers or the FA, but this bombast is balanced by his sense of humour and love and enthusiasm for (most of) the clubs he managed and for the game in general. He is clearly a masterful motivator of players and (when not deliberately winding up opposing managers) a genuinely nice bloke.

Love him or loath him, football would be a duller sport without Neil Warnock, and his book is every bit as entertaining as you would imagine.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 12 August 2007
Neil Warnock is one of football's most colourful characters. In this book you get a pretty good idea of his dry wit, and there's no mistaking the fact the man isn't short of a sense of humour. However what does become apparent more than ever is the lack of reason or accountability for his own actions. His honesty within the book is not in doubt, but there are moments where he proves himself to be a hypocrite, always blaming the opposition managers for any fall outs he has had with them, even after often admitting that he set out to wind them up initially.
Certainly an interesting read, but if you're one of the many that find Mr Warnock hard to stomach then this is unlikely to endear him to you.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Neil Warnock clearly has a vibrant sense of humour and there is no doubt that this is an entertaining read. However this is off-set by his delusional opinions and lack of humility. The man is one of those people who cannot ever accept his culpability for anything. So however endearing his droll take on events is you are immediately alienated by his refusal to even consider that he -Neil Warnock - might ever have got something slightly wrong and contributed to whatever disasters befell the teams under his control.
Take Sheffield United's relegation last season. It was other managers failure for fielding weakened teams, referees at fault for being ...well. rubbish referees , the players fault for being poor and tactically naive , conveniently forgetting that it was he that coached them and prepared them for the games . And of course there is The Carlos Tevez affair where he does deserve some sympathy . But having realised where the wind was blowing why did he just not accept the fact and motivate his team to perform instead of consistently whinging , then , they just might have scored enough goals to stay up. The only other caveat it's fair enough to accept is the impact the injury to Rob Hulse had , but you should never rely on one player because if he gets injured........
I am genuinely torn about Warnock , he is amusing, honest and passionate but he is also a fantasist , over opinionated , biased to a deleterious degree, pig headed , and lacking any form of self awareness, making him unable to change in any way. He is also immature at times . I don,t think its right for anybody in his position to find one player head-butting another "hilarious" even if the victim was Marcus Bent . The book as a consequence is a good read in an undemanding way. Its fun but lacks true insight and depth and is as likely to annoy as much as anything else and in that respect it's a perfect reflection of its, author.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
I thought that the vast majority - over 90% - of this book was really excellent. The story of Neil Warnocks early life and of his career as a average lower league player is extremely entertaining and his told with a large helping of good humour. Perhaps it is just me, but I find stories about life on the lower rungs of the football ladder to be much more enjoyable than those told by the big names of the Premier League.

When Warnock moves into management the book steps up a further gear as he describes his struggles trying to kick start a succession of under achieving clubs, which I found to be totally engrossing. It should be pointed out that, more often than not, he brought a degree of success to each club and left them in a much healthier state than he found them.

What let the book down to me though, were the later chapters in which he allows the darker side of his nature come to the fore. In these pages he first tells about his deep dislike of various members of the football fraternity. The reader is left in no doubt as to Neil Warnocks opinions of Stan Ternant, Wally Downs and Gary Megson amongst others. He clearly doesn't believe in the expression 'forgive and forget'.

He also devotes a chapter to his favourite people - referees. I don't think he likes them very much and he obviously thinks they don't like him much neither. He is probably right.

The final section is about his last season as Sheffield Utd manager, when to be fair to Mr Warnock, circumstances DID conspire against them to finally condemn them to relegation. The bitterness he feels about the events of that season are clear expressed in this book.

The chances are that before reading this book you wouldn't like Neil Warnock very much and I am not sure that after reading it you will like him any more. You can't argue though that he his a character, so we should be glad that he his around to add a little colour to our increasingly sterile national game.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 30 December 2010
This is a great book,one of those that once you have picked it up, you cant put it down. Just a shame that Neil Warnock is no longer at bramhall lane, what a legend.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 15 January 2009
Neil Warnock will never be politically correct, but should be commended for his forthright views and his devil may care approach to expressing them.

A player himself in the lower divisions he certainly doesn't boast about his ability as he describes himself as 'brainless' and a 'journeyman'.

A highly astute manager, he has worked his way through non-league football and the lower echelons of the football league with much aplomb.
He's succeeded with sometimes no funds available to buy players, or at best-had very little money ever available to him, at any of his clubs.
He's mastered the use of loan deals and by buying( on the cheap) home-grown players who are getting on a bit, but still have lots of experience.

This in itself is significant in today's greatly inflated transfer market, where there is a widely held belief that you cannot have managerial success without megapots of money!
He then motivates his players to getting the best from them, and fosters a team spirit that may not be possible from a multinational team.

His chapter on referees is a good read in itself, and he pulls no punches on who he respects in this field, and who he doesn't!!!

A very well written book, that is expressed in an honest, forthright fashion throughout.( Never more apparent when he tells a certain ex-liverpool player and sky pundit to "f**k off pinochio)

I believe it is Warnock's outspoken, and perhaps abrasive nature (to some) that has been the reason why he's not the manager of a top premiership club.
Perhaps like Brian Clough, he'd be a worthy candidate to manage England but never will. Foreign management seems to be flavour of the month these days for national jobs.

Warnock's passion for the game, and the extraordinary degree of empathy he shows his players shines through on every page.
A very enjoyable and recommended read throughout.
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on 21 February 2008
Warnock is a controversial man and I concur with the views of others who wisely point out that if you don't like him before, you won't like him after you've read this book. I'll say one thing for him, though...he was always willing to turn his hand to anything to earn a living for his family and anyone who goes round old people's homes treating the corns of little old ladies and sad little gents is a cut above. Can't see Ronaldo on his knees with a gnarled old foot in one hand and his verruca scalpel in the other earning £5 a throw.
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on 1 June 2011
I purchased this book after being a long-time Sheffield United fan, admirer of Neil Warnock's fab personality, and then finding out that he was raised in the part of Sheffield that I was.
The book kept me reading past the memories of being brought up in Frecheville, Sheffield, and it is so well written I could hear Neil's voice reading it to me. The stories of his managing the clubs he did kept me interested, even though I had thought it might be a bit boring for a female reader.

Well done Neil, bring on part 2!
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on 24 February 2008
I was given this book as a present and was somewhat surprised at how much I enjoyed it. Warnock shows his drive and enthusiasm for the game of football, through, both the good and the bad times. He holds no grudges from his split with Sheff Utd and very few throughout the book, however, he does let loose with some of his opinions on some people!!!! A good read, try it and be surprised like me.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 17 February 2011
Wonderful. He's never managed my club, but Neil I love you. I bought this and the Ian Holloway book Ollie at the same time. Both men are honest, delightful, and people who don't even like football would adore both as human beings. Only one of mthose has a book that shows this - Made in Sheffield. This book was wonderful, written well, the stories were fabulous and forthright. Imagine having a manager who loved your club, hated your enemy, shared your passions, humour. This is that man. This is that book. QPR are blessed. Neil come manage my club one day. Please.
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