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3.5 out of 5 stars
The Friday Night Knitting Club
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 26 July 2007
The gentle story of Georgia and her daughter Dakota. Georgia is a single mum. James, Dakota's father moved from the USA to France and Georgia was left to raise their baby alone. Through a meeting with a lady in the park she starts Walker and Daughter a yarn shop, which is the venue for the Friday Knitting Club. Life is calm and progressive, until James re enters their lives and wants to get to know his daughter. Just as things start to develop between Georgia and James, something dreadful happens, which leaves the family and friends of Georgia devistated. A really good book, interspersed with knitting pattens and recipes. This is the story of determination,friendship and love.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on 13 October 2007
It's like a big mug of hot chocolate - with cream !! This book has everything - friendships, hobbies, children, family. Warm and witty with an unexpected ending. If you like knitting, you'll LOVE this !! AB FAB !

Wendy, Washington, Tyne & Wear.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
A bit reminiscent of Ann Hood's The Knitting Circle we are again introduced to a group of women who meet to knit and find that they've stitched strong bonds of friendship. What raises Jacobs's debut novel above the average women-support-women tale is the author's finely crafted prose and a sterling reading by Carrington MacDuffie.

A recording artist and spoken word performer, MacDffie vitalizes a disparate cast of characters from Georgia Walker, a single mom and owner of a yarn ship to daughter, Dakota, to Darwin Chiu, a militant feminist, to shop staffer Peri, to Anita, Georgia's stalwart friend and helper, and more. Her narration ably reflects the different ages, backgrounds, and personalities involved.

The Friday Night Knitting Club is a cozy, warm read peopled with characters we'd like to know. It's easy to lose oneself in the story and feel very much a part of the group, as we hear: "Without ever putting up one sign or announcing the creation of a knitting club, these women began regularly appearing in the evenings and, well, loitering. Chatting with each other, talking to Anita, gathering about the large round table in the center of the room, picking up where they had left things the week before. And then, one Friday last fall, it became official. Well, sort of.

Lucie, a striking woman with short, sandy-colored hair, who favored tortoiseshell glasses over her big, blue eyes and colorful, funky outfits, was an occasional shopper at Walker and Daughter. She came in every few months and was always working on the same piece, a thick cable knit sweater--a man's garment. There were a lot of these types who came in to the store, folks whose knitting ambitions were out of line with either their ability or with whatever mysterious comings and goings kept them from sitting down and getting the job done. "

And so it began. All seems to go smoothly until the reappearance of Dakota's dad who wants to move back into Georgia's life, and unexpected events in the other women's lives.

Jacobs is a deft storyteller and along with the laughter and tears she has surprises in store. The Friday Night Knitting club is an affectionate, engaging story of female friendship and will soon be found on the big screen starring Julia Roberts.

Enjoy!
- Gail Cooke
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 2 September 2007
a lovely satisfying and poignant book to curl up and read when you won't be disturbed ... because you won't want to put it down. the deceptively simple story unfolds among a cast of fascinating and sympathetically portrayed characters, weaving their stories together like one of the knitting projects it describes. i hope this author has written some other novels, because i'd like more, please
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 24 December 2009
As a new knitter, I was looking forward to a great "chick lit" book. Nothing heavy, mind you, just funny and cheerful, like the knitting groups I attend.
This book is not that.
Moving far too slowly, then rushing to the (sad) main scenario, I STOPPED reading about one-third of the way in. After flipping ahead and getting the gist, I did something I have never done. I tossed the book into recycling. Unfinished. I disliked it so intensely I did not even want to donate it to a charity.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 3 January 2008
I can't understand why this book has so many rave reviews. It started off slow, could hardly be described as well written and was full of cliches and plot devices that left me scratching my head in confusion.

It reminded me of one of those bad made-for-tv movies you get on the Hallmark channel. No real emotion and a lot of smaltzy advice and overacting.

Average at best, and definitley not worth the hype.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Judging from the other reviews on here, this is a bit of a 'marmite' book. I personally loved it however, and I'm quite fussy when it comes to chick-lit. This book was much better than I thought it would be, and I much preferred it to Jacob's other novel 'Comfort Food.' Jacob's is very skilled at creating characters that the reader can both empathise with and wish you knew them personally- and this novel is no exception. It's neither too silly or too fluffy- it's just very nicely done.

Focusing around fiesty, independent Georgia Walker who runs a knitting shop in New York, this book mainly centers around friendships- the evolving relationships of the somewhat odd-ball customers who come into her shop to learn the craft of knitting, old friends of hers that re-emerge, her family ties and also her strained relationship with her young daughter Dakota's estranged father.

For me this book was a real page turner and it held my interest all the way through with just the right balance of romance and family. I loved how the author managed to give every single character their own personality and allocate equal chapter time to them all. By the time I was a quarter of the way through I was really caught up in the trials and tribulations of all the characters, and when the end was drawing near I was quite disappointed. I'm only glad there's a sequel!

If you like your chicklit on the sentimental side then this is definitely the book for you to curl up with- I'd just recommend that you have a box of tissues handy! :)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
This is not the usual type of book I would read, in fact I've had alot of raised eyebrow from work friends who are surprised at me reading this. However, I've got to say I absolutely loved it. I suppose I was drawn to it as I like knitting but you don't have to knit to enjoy this. It's a book about relationships, friendship, life, love, motherhood and joy. I loved the characters and felt as if it wasn't a chore to read at all. Georgia is a great character as is Marty, Anita, Lucie and the rest of the gang.

If you contemplating reading this but it's not your usual I would say go on give it a go as it's great and what an ending!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 24 September 2007
I needed my tissues! I'm not normally a one for having a blub at 'chick-lit' but I was right there with the kitchen roll lol. This book is simply fabulous, it's heart-warming and endearing. Full of wonderful characters (even if they do have dodgy names!) this was a fabulous find.

I really couldn't put this book down. I started it thinking it would be a trashy frothy read but I quickly became involved in the lives of Georgia (a single mother) and her 12 year old daughter Dakota. The knitting rapidly becomes second best to the wonderful friendships that have developed.

A great story with some tugs at the heart strings. A little predictable in places but a cosy lovely read. Enjoy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I really didn't get on with this book at all. The writing style was unbelievably poor, particularly in the sections that were supposed to have been written by the heroine about knitting. Sentences trailed off into nothing, the grammar was appalling, it just didn't make sense. You get the feeling that if she had knitted a garment as badly as she had put this book together it would have ended up as a very moth eaten dish cloth.

The characters didn't work for me. I didn't find them very sympathetic, or like any of them very much. I found the relationship between Georgia and her daughter cloying, and painful, and unlikely, and everyone else just irritating. I'm afraid that the word I would use to describe the entire book is 'unlikely'. Every situation, every conversation, everything was just contrived and the whole thing lacked naturalism. I just could not believe that any of this could be true, so it definitely didn't work for me.
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