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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Easy to understand and well layed out.
My opinion of this book is quite mixed. I like the way that the chapters and pages are layed out. The dialogues are great. The only real problem that I had with this book is that the Urdu script is very small. For a person who can already read Urdu I am sure it is fine but for someone who is trying to learn it can be difficult to distinguish the similar looking letters.
Published on 16 Sep 2001

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but forget it for learning Urdu script
I struggled for two weeks trying to understand Urdu script from the introductory chapter in this book. I found it incomplete, not showing all possible combinations of consonants and vowels, etc., some of which can significantly change shape depending on their connection. I understand that there is a separate book on "Teach Yourself Urdu Script", but I was put off buying...
Published on 5 Jun 2010 by Anton


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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Easy to understand and well layed out., 16 Sep 2001
By A Customer
My opinion of this book is quite mixed. I like the way that the chapters and pages are layed out. The dialogues are great. The only real problem that I had with this book is that the Urdu script is very small. For a person who can already read Urdu I am sure it is fine but for someone who is trying to learn it can be difficult to distinguish the similar looking letters.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars clear and invaluable self study tool, 7 Nov 2008
This review is from: Teach Yourself Urdu Book/CD Pack (Teach Yourself Complete Courses) (Paperback)
As a language teacher myself, I really appreciate the thought that has gone into producing this course book. The language structures and vocabulary are systematically and progressively introduced so that you don't get swamped by too much new stuff at a time. And new language learned is recycled in later chapters so that it sticks in your head. A typical chapter contains 3 dialogues (the book follows the adventures of John in Karachi) which are also on the CD. After a translation and vocabulary glossary, a few grammar points are explained after each dialogue. There are a couple of written/oral/aural exercises that go with each dialogue. There is a word glossary at the back, as well as keys to the exercises.

This is NOT an easy course. But if you take it slowly, a few pages at a time, and review what you have learned often, it offers a very thorough grounding in Urdu. The topics are useful, covering everyday conversation and situations. In my opinion, the CD is essential as Urdu pronunciation is rather tricky for English speakers. It also helps you to memorise the dialogues.

I agree, the Urdu print is small for beginners and there is no guidance for handwriting. As I already had a grounding in Arabic, this was no big deal for me. For complete newcomers to the script, try the Teach Yourself book on this topic.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but forget it for learning Urdu script, 5 Jun 2010
By 
Anton (HYDE, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I struggled for two weeks trying to understand Urdu script from the introductory chapter in this book. I found it incomplete, not showing all possible combinations of consonants and vowels, etc., some of which can significantly change shape depending on their connection. I understand that there is a separate book on "Teach Yourself Urdu Script", but I was put off buying it due to the letter type in this book being so small that it doesn't convey the subtleties of the script and I needed a magnifying glass to read the characters (seriously!). If you want a serious book on Urdu script, get "Let's Study Urdu - An Introduction to the Script" by Ali S. Asani and Syed Akbar Hyder. It's clear and comprehensive and "unlocks the key" to the script.

Having said all that, Teach Yourself Urdu dialogues are nice and clear, and useful vocabulary is introduced up front, though I feel the context of certain vocabulary could be better explained, but you will need something extra to get to grips with the script, because without that you will never be able to read Urdu.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good Study Text - easy to follow, 2 Dec 2013
By 
Tahir Usman - See all my reviews
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This was the recommended textbook for an Urdu course I took so it was a book I had to buy. As usual Amazon had it and at a cheaper price than elsewhere. We used the book all the time in class so it was a good investment. The book is well set out and easy to follow. There is a really useful list of Urdu numbers at the back in English and Urdu, showing how they are pronounced all the way up to 100.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent course, 21 April 2011
The two best Urdu courses currently available are this one and 'Colloquial Urdu'. They are both excellent, but in different ways, so I'll make some comparisons to help you choose. I'll refer to 'Teach Yourself Complete Urdu' as 'TY' and 'Colloquial Urdu' as 'CU'.

Audio material
-------------------
Both courses come with CDs containing recordings of the dialogues, and much additional audio material. Be careful when ordering - it's not always clear from the product information whether you're ordering the book, or the CDs, or the pack containing both.

The TY audio material is much better - the actors really do act, and the dialogues flow well. Some of the actors in CU speak in a halting, disconnected way, which makes it hard to get a grip on how a sentence should flow. If you decide to buy CU, beware - the old-style plastic presentation box packaging, containing book and CDs, is hopeless inadequate because the CDs become detached from their anchor points and rattle around in the packaging, which means that they can get so scratched as to be unplayable.

Dialogues
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The TY dialogues are far more useful and practical, dealing with a wide range of everyday situations. The CU dialogues are good, but somewhat wayward in their choice of subject matter.

Writing Urdu
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If you want to learn just to speak Urdu, without learning to write, then TY is not for you, because later lessons do not contain transliteration of the dialogues, and you are left to fend for yourself with the Urdu script. You would do better with CU, where everything in the lessons is in transliteration, and the Urdu script versions of the dialogues are in an appendix at the back (in ridiculously tiny font - anyone over 45 who doesn't have a recently prescribed pair of reading glasses will struggle to read them). The Urdu script in TY is also very small and sometimes indistinct. Both TY and CU have good sections on learning Urdu script, but in CU these sections are totally divorced from the main body of the course. You will get far more practice in the script, and become far more fluent in it, if you opt for TY.

Grammar explanations
------------------------------
TY is friendlier here, with easy to follow, full and lucid explanations of all grammatical points. CU is very good but uses some odd terminology and could be more lucid when explaining some of the more difficult points. TY provides fuller tabulation of grammatical forms in each lesson.

Transliteration
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I definitely prefer the CU transliteration system, but both are absolutely consistent and clear, and it's very much a personal matter - some people may prefer the TY system.

Summary
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The choice of course depends very much on whether you want to learn the script. If you don't, if you just want to learn to speak Urdu, then CU is the best choice. If you want to learn the script, then go for TY. Both courses are excellent in their different ways, despite any caveats above.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Not very good I have many urdu books at home and all ..., 1 Sep 2014
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Not very good I have many urdu books at home and all I wanted was some simple but it's written in Arabic and not easy to understand dialect or pronunciation
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17 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A helpful aid, 27 Sep 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Urdu (TYL) (Paperback)
This book is a good starting point for picking up basic grammer and sentence structure covering areas such as greetings, directions etc.
The urdru script is very small and often difficult to read - especially as later chapters do not include phonetic translations.
Helpful if you are taking classes as well but may be a struggle alone - the tapes are worth getting to help pronunciation
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Teach Yourself Urdu Book/CD Pack (Teach Yourself Complete Courses)
Teach Yourself Urdu Book/CD Pack (Teach Yourself Complete Courses) by David Matthews (Paperback - 25 Nov 2005)
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