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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fatwa - living with a death threat
I agree with the other readers, this was a very compelling read. I read this in 2 days and could not put it down. The book starts at the end and then goes back to the beginning to explain how she got herself into that situation, you are left hanging through the whole book to find out 'did she make it out with the children?'.Knowing this was a true story makes it all so...
Published on 22 Aug 2007 by Robert Burge

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good read....but not great!
I recently devoured Betty Mahmoody's "Not Without My Daughter" and have been on the hunt for similar books. From the blurb, "Fatwa" seemed ideal. It was an easy read (finished in a day), but it didn't captivate me the way I had hoped. I didn't like the way the narrative would switch from an actual account of what had happened to Jacky's thoughts. To be honest it just...
Published on 27 Dec 2009 by WindsorMummy


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fatwa - living with a death threat, 22 Aug 2007
By 
Robert Burge "sam Burge" (West Sussex, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Fatwa: Living with a Death Threat (Paperback)
I agree with the other readers, this was a very compelling read. I read this in 2 days and could not put it down. The book starts at the end and then goes back to the beginning to explain how she got herself into that situation, you are left hanging through the whole book to find out 'did she make it out with the children?'.Knowing this was a true story makes it all so much worse as you couldn't belive that someone would have to suffer like this. I have read a lot of books based on the subject (Sold, Mosiac, out of Iran) of mixed marriages/women forced into marriage etc. This was an outstandingly written account of someones worst nightmare, I cried reading the account of what poor Jacky went through. I am so sorry that Jacky had to experience this. Thank you for sharing this with us Jacky. To my Husband - I love you very much x
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really brilliant, 6 Sep 2004
This review is from: Fatwa: Living with a Death Threat (Paperback)
I couldn't put this book down, what a life Jacky lead out there in Egypt, I thought how strong she must have been to keep going for as long as she did. I was really glad that she managed to escape with both her daughter's, my heart really went out to her. This is a must read for those who enjoy the 'none fictions'. I'm really interested in the Middle East too and have travelled to Iran, but you don't always realise what happens to some of these poor women, at least being English she had a brilliant country to come home too. Well done.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good read....but not great!, 27 Dec 2009
By 
WindsorMummy (Windsor) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Fatwa: Living with a Death Threat (Paperback)
I recently devoured Betty Mahmoody's "Not Without My Daughter" and have been on the hunt for similar books. From the blurb, "Fatwa" seemed ideal. It was an easy read (finished in a day), but it didn't captivate me the way I had hoped. I didn't like the way the narrative would switch from an actual account of what had happened to Jacky's thoughts. To be honest it just seemed like an extra long true story article taken from a woman's weekly! It seemed a lot of detail was given to certain things, building the story up...but then when you thought you were getting to the meaty bit of the plans to escape etc, it just seemed rather glossed over.
I certainly feel for Jacky and her awful experience at the hands of her husband, and admire her courage for putting her life at risk to save her daughters. I can't put my finger on what exactly it was but something just didn't sit right with me. A pleasant enough book to read (not taking into account the subject matter of course!) but not one I'd recommend to a friend. Sorry!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Life Behind The Veil, 25 Sep 2010
By 
Ian Millard - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Fatwa: Living with a Death Threat (Paperback)
This book is part of what has become a whole genre of "real life" literature dealing with the dangers and problems facing "Western" (i.e. white northern European/North American) women who marry Muslim husbands and go to live in the Arab, Iranian etc countries.

I read the book out of curiosity, having visited Egypt in the past, on two visits. The first time I was there (1994) I was on a four-day break in Luxor, at the Hilton, but the second time (1997-98) I was on a fairly strict budget (by Western standards) and lived for three months in the country: in Aswan, in a tent on the Red Sea, in a rented flat in Alexandria (one month) and (for another month) in the quite remote desert oasis of Siwa.

During my second trip I heard a lot of stories about Western women (mainly British) who married Egyptians. The affair often began during felucca trips down the Nile or the like, under the desert stars etc...The marriage was usually followed by a trip to the UK by the woman, to sell her house (often all she had left after UK divorce...). Then return to Egypt and purchase of a flat in her new husband's name. Then another trip to UK to tie up loose ends. The shock usually came when the British woman returned to her new Egyptian flat, only to be confronted by the woman she thought was her sister-in-law and who in reality was the real/first wife of the Egyptian husband...Result? Usually return of British woman to UK, sadder, wiser and penniless. A kind of legalized fraud.

I met two British women myself who had married Egyptians, but who had different and differing experiences. One was a woman of maybe 45-50, who was married to a much younger man, a Copt (Christian). True, she had financed their business but their marriage was obviously genuine and quite like any typical UK equivalent. The second woman was young and had married a man from Ismailiya...it had not worked out and they had been divorced; she was living alone in Alexandria and liked it there and was even studying at the University and living a kind of expat life with occasional trips to the Spitfire Bar (one of the few places where you can now get a drink in Alex without a problem) or the "Portuguese Club".

The difference between those cases and the one in this book may be that in the book the lady had children by her Egyptian husband.

I have to say that, having had problems myself with the system in Egypt (in my case a run-in, through "a series of unfortunate events" with the Mukhabarat or secret/security police, eventually ironed out, thank God!), the attempt of the lady in the book to break free and to eventually get out of Egypt did make my blood run a little cold. This is not a country in which to be powerless or poor (or in trouble with the authorities). A hard country from which to exit "unofficially"...The lady who wrote this book of course had the added built-in and, in a Muslim country, inescapably handicapping disadvantage of being a woman.

In fact, some Egyptians can be charming and friendly and, unlike the lady here, I do like tamiyah (falafel) and --admittedly an acquired taste!-- molokiyah (a peculiar slimy vegetable soup made from indigenous green leaves), though I have to agree with her that fool (cooked beans) is foul!

The lady soon found that a Western, British woman in what Steiner called "the age of the Consciousness-soul" has different cultural expectations from a Muslim man coming from a quite backward and static culture. The financial/lifestyle differences are obviously also huge.

I had to wonder why she so quickly became enamoured of Omar, her future husband. It seems to me that 30 years of "anti-racist" propaganda in the UK has led to a situation whereby it may seem normal to a lot of girls, brainwashed by "anti-racist" propaganda during formative years of education (in schools, or via TV and magazines etc), to get involved with non-European men (Arabs, blacks, whatever...) whether in the UK or elsewhere. She does not say where she comes from but the slight evidence in the book makes me think Grimsby or that region. I think from the £-LE exchange rate and her statement that this all happened 15 years ago, around 1988-90.

I found the book a slightly skin-crawling good read on the whole.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Compelling but missing minor details, 9 Jun 2007
By 
Hayley (Leicester, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Fatwa: Living with a Death Threat (Paperback)
I thought this was a fascinating book , I read it in a day - I literally could not put it down! It's a nice easy read, an interesting story and an eye-opener to Egyptian day-to-day life (ie housing conditions, meal preparation etc).

I found it hard to have much sympathy for Jacky as I do with any Western woman who allows themselves to be repressed; as she chose to marry him and bear his children etc. If you want to read an truly sad account of Western and Arab relationships, I would recommend Miriam Ali and her daughter Zana Muhsen's books.

Jacky has written a brilliant book on her life in Egypt but I didn't feel as moved by her escape as I did when reading Miriam and Zana's terrible and gripping stories.

But I have recommended this book to my friends as I did really enjoy it, I just felt some minor details were missed. For example, she never specifies dates. What was the age difference between her and Omar (probably irrelevant, but something I am curious about) and also, what happened to Dave? Did she ever hear from him again?

Overall, a thoroughly interestin read!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WOW, 13 Feb 2011
This review is from: Fatwa: Living with a Death Threat (Paperback)
I brought this book along with `Invisible Women: True Stories of Courage and Survival' when I was at work (about 2 years ago, the book came as a package). I just did not have time to read it and more importantly I am not a big reader! However I found some time and was more interested to read the 2nd book by Jacky Trevane as it had short stories so I thought they would be a quick read and I can put it down after each short story. I finished it in 2 nights! This book was amazing!

After reading this and knowing briefly about what Jacky went through in Egypt (her second book includes a brief story about herself), I was not sure whether I wanted to read this book thinking I already know the story! To my surprise I began reading this book yesterday. I started at 12 midnight and could not put it down. As I did not have work the next morning I read it until 7am in the morning. That should say it all. It was a great read. Initially I did not sympathise with Jacky thinking how stupid of her to marry this Egyptian man within 10 days! Honestly its not like she was 16! She was 23! She should have known better. However as I kept reading the book I felt for her and it actually disturbed me. As I read the book I actually felt my heart racing feeling the love, passion and most of all the fear Jacky felt. To know that this is also a true story, I did feel a little disturbed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Puts a different spin on holidaying in Egypt., 2 May 2010
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This review is from: Fatwa: Living with a Death Threat (Paperback)
The book was an eye opener and should send a stark warning to all Western women thinking of embarking on a relationship with an Islamic man. When you live in the West, where it is "every man for himself" when it comes to relationships, it is very easy to fall for a handsome man abroad who woos you and charms you like no other. In cultures where pre marital sex is non-existent, they have to be charming to meet a woman and court her, raise a dowry and propose marriage and all this whilst the woman keeps her virtue intact until the marriage ceremony is complete.

Personally, Jacky's naivety astonished me beyond belief. I wouldn't marry a Western man after knowing him for a few weeks let alone a foreigner with cultural, language and religous differences thrown in. She could have saved herself a lot of heartbreak if she had researched what she was getting herself into. I'm suprised that she knew nothing of female genital mutilation, especially in a country where it is rampant. It makes me wonder just how bad things could have got for her if her husband forced her and her daughters to undergo this barbaric operation, as many women are forced to do.

Yes, there are a lot of Islamic men who marry Western women and things work out fine but when they go bad they get catastrophic. I wouldn't go there myself, but say each to their own if any woman decides otherwise for herself.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing story, 11 Feb 2014
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Amazing read, could nt put this book down and read in one weekend. Am shocked that this is a true story, makes u be thankful of our English life style. Has definitely done its intended job, would never go near a Moslem man and will making sure my daughters read this story too and well done Jacky.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Book, 10 July 2005
This review is from: Fatwa: Living with a Death Threat (Paperback)
I have just finished this book and I could not put it down. It was read in two days. When you read this book you feel you are there and feel nervous for jacky in what she has to go through. She is a remarkable women who never gave up. I was egging her on when she faced the officials and could not belive how I felt whilst reading it. I felt she was really was naive to get herself into that situation, but was very interested in their way of life and how you must really think before you do anything like that. The saying 'act in haste, repent at your leisure' could not be more true in the situation.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Could not put it down until I had finished the whole book, 9 Feb 2014
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This review is from: Fatwa: Living with a Death Threat (Paperback)
I had read this book and wanted a copy to send to a friend so that she could read it. Was delighted to find it on Amazon and even though it was a used item it was in very good condition.
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Fatwa: Living with a Death Threat
Fatwa: Living with a Death Threat by Jacky Trevane (Paperback - 22 Jan 2004)
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