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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Fanfare for the Common Man
Pollard's "Seven Ages of Britain" explores British history from the perspective of the common people, describing what it might have been like to live in each of "seven ages" from the end of the last ice age until the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. The focus is not on royalty or battles (which are usually mentioned only in passing) but on the homes that people...
Published on 11 Jan. 2004 by William Holmes

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5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars SEVEN AGES OF BRITAIN
Following on from the comments of the previous review, I was extremely disappointed
with the "Fourth Age". Like the televised series, this particular epoch was dealt with in a particularly Anglo-centric fashion. While the spread of Anglo-Saxon culture and the development of an English nation were definitive moments in history, no mention has been made of the...
Published on 6 April 2011 by UBLOONY


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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Fanfare for the Common Man, 11 Jan. 2004
By 
William Holmes "semloh2287" (Portland, OR USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Seven Ages of Britain (Hardcover)
Pollard's "Seven Ages of Britain" explores British history from the perspective of the common people, describing what it might have been like to live in each of "seven ages" from the end of the last ice age until the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. The focus is not on royalty or battles (which are usually mentioned only in passing) but on the homes that people lived in, what they ate, how they farmed, who they married, what they believed in, how they celebrated and how their lives were changed during the great "ages" of British history. The settings include the end of the last ice age and the resulting formation of the English Channel, the prehistoric settlement of the British Isles, the Roman conquest, the Dark Ages, the Norman conquest, the Black Death and its aftermath, the Reformation and the beginning of the Industrial Revolution.
The book includes many interesting tidbits that make history come alive for the reader. Pollard explains, for example, that the difference between the Anglo-Saxon words "pig" and "cow" and the Norman French words "pork" and "beef" represents the gulf between conquered and conqueror. The Anglo-Saxons worked their farms for the benefit of the Normans, so we inherited their words for living animals; the Normans enjoyed the produce of their Anglo-Saxon tenants, and so we retained their words for the animals' meat. The observation is illuminating, and it provides a useful bit of trivia for conversation over cocktails.
If you enjoy Pollard's book, you might want to consider a few other works that stress the history and experiences of the common people, including Lacey and Danziger's "The Year 1000: What Life Was Like at the Turn of the First Millennium"; Danziger & Gillingham's "1215: The Year of Magna Carta"; and Julian Richards' "Meet the Ancestors: Unearthing the Evidence that Brings us Face to Face with the Past."
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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A history for all of us not born into a Royal family, 7 Oct. 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Seven Ages of Britain (Hardcover)
At last a history of Britain that talks about the people as a whole rather than the tiny handful of royals, politician and generals who dominate most histories.
This is a moving account of how the people of Britain lived over eight millennia, told with real passion and a great deal of humour. Mr Pollard has drawn together a incredibly wide range of sources, weaving the beautifully observed minutiae of daily life into the broader canvass of national events. It's a book that makes you feel like you have a place in history as something other than an outside observer. It just goes to show that when you remove the famous names that dominate history there is actually a better story hiding beneath. The accompanying TV series should be quite something.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it, 26 Jun. 2004
By 
Mr. M. A. Howles (West Wales) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Seven Ages of Britain (Hardcover)
If you want a quick but very interesting history of Britain with excellent details this is the one. Watched the TV series and learnt more from that than I did from 4 years learning History at school.
The book will only take you a day or so to read, it's that good.
Mike
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book for local/family historians/ geneologists, 15 Oct. 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Seven Ages of Britain (Hardcover)
Tracing your family history or the history of where you live can be great fun but you're very lucky to be related to (or live in a house owned by) someone famous. This book makes the link between the local and family history that we all have and the 'big' history of the great names. If you want a good introduction to just where your family fits into British history then this is the book for you. Lots of great stories of normal people doing amazing things. Shame it stops in the 17th century. Any chance of a sequel?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good taster for wider reading, 28 Jan. 2007
By 
John Hopper (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Seven Ages of Britain (Paperback)
A good introduction to the seven periods of British history the book distinguishes, serving as a useful taster for wider reading, especially the early chapters exploring less well known eras. Some discussion of the Celtic debate would have been useful though - Celts are not mentioned in the book at all.
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4.0 out of 5 stars I bought this used and generally the condition is pretty good. There was a bit of damage to ..., 20 Nov. 2014
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This review is from: Seven Ages of Britain (Hardcover)
This is a Christmas present for a relative. I bought this used and generally the condition is pretty good. There was a bit of damage to the back cover which I'd a shame, but the rest of the book looks quite good
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5.0 out of 5 stars The book was as good as the TV Series, 2 Oct. 2013
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ND Emery "PS 207" (Romsey UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Seven Ages of Britain (Hardcover)
Just what one needed to back up the TV series. Very interesting and well written. This was a good buy
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5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars SEVEN AGES OF BRITAIN, 6 April 2011
This review is from: Seven Ages of Britain (Hardcover)
Following on from the comments of the previous review, I was extremely disappointed
with the "Fourth Age". Like the televised series, this particular epoch was dealt with in a particularly Anglo-centric fashion. While the spread of Anglo-Saxon culture and the development of an English nation were definitive moments in history, no mention has been made of the surviving British kingdoms, the influence of the Irish missionaries (especially in the north-east of England and particularly upon Bede) and those (conveniently ignored) other parts of Britain, namely Wales and Scotland. It was frighteningly reminiscent of the "history" taught to British schoolchildren during the 1940s and the 1950s. To be kind to Pollard and Hughes, maybe they were just careless, or at least I hope they were. Nevertheless, This is much like writing a book about the History of Europe and ignoring the French, the Germans and the Italians. This book should more appropriately have been titled "The Seven Ages of ENGLAND".
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First Secondhand Book Purchased, 26 April 2013
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This review is from: Seven Ages of Britain (Hardcover)
I wanted this book and saw it for 2p plus postage so went for it. The condition of the book was good, as described. I was aware of the book so it was obviously fit for purpose. Could not be more pleased.
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