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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant book
I got this book on the strength of the adverts for the movie that lined bus stops all over my home town. I was pleasantly surprised. The book starts off and sounds like it is going to be all rubbish and analysising, but after the first chapter the events of Point Pleasant makes this book really interesting and easy to read. I would recommend this to anyone whether they...
Published on 23 Mar 2002

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Freely based on a true story
John Keel used to be a well known investigator of the paranormal, an investigator of the non-sceptical variety. "The Mothman Prophecies" is his most famous work.

The book has been marketed as the scariest thing ever written, but is actually quite bland compared to the accounts of alien abductions and 2012 apocalypses littering the bookstalls these days. But...
Published on 24 April 2011 by Ashtar Command


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant book, 23 Mar 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Mothman Prophecies (Paperback)
I got this book on the strength of the adverts for the movie that lined bus stops all over my home town. I was pleasantly surprised. The book starts off and sounds like it is going to be all rubbish and analysising, but after the first chapter the events of Point Pleasant makes this book really interesting and easy to read. I would recommend this to anyone whether they are into the paranormal or not. It is an excellent book. A must read and will open your eyes to the weirdness that really does go on on this planet!
I really want to see the film now but it isn't on anywhere. I'll have to wait to rent that!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best documented paranormal events!!, 7 Sep 2003
This review is from: The Mothman Prophecies (Paperback)
Having researched this subject for many years this book is a very good explanation of events. Although not much Mothman is mentioned, the reason is John Keel didn't experience the Mothman personally. This book reflects his experience in Point Pleasant, and he does it very well. I fully recommend the book, its the best documented sighting to date, and well worth a look...
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Mothman Prophecies, 28 Jun 2002
This review is from: The Mothman Prophecies (Paperback)
To anyone this book would be an enthralling read. To anyone interested in any aspect of the paranormal this is a must read. I have always had a limited interest in the paranormal but as many other people are, I have always been sceptical about alleged sightings. This book however presents what seem to be very unbelievable events in a very believable way.
Being someone who has studied English Literature in the past, I noticed that this book reads very much like fiction, in the way it grabs your attention and I found it almost impossible to put it down. That only adds to the appeal of the book and I would say that it would be ideal for any book worm who fancies reading something a little different from the norm.
If you get the chance whoever you are, then I would suggest you read this and prepare yourself to be amazed and convinced by the experiences of John Keel and all of the seemingly eccentric, but in my opinion, genuine witnesses he met along the way.
A real pleasure to read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Freely based on a true story, 24 April 2011
This review is from: The Mothman Prophecies (Paperback)
John Keel used to be a well known investigator of the paranormal, an investigator of the non-sceptical variety. "The Mothman Prophecies" is his most famous work.

The book has been marketed as the scariest thing ever written, but is actually quite bland compared to the accounts of alien abductions and 2012 apocalypses littering the bookstalls these days. But then, it was originally published in 1975.

Personally, I consider the book to be a major disappointment. Keel comes across as paranoid, a kind of real life Fox Moulder. A mysterious dwarf with an eerie alien voice comes looking for him in West Virginia. The alien dwarf calls Keel in New York. Then, the phone just goes BEEP-BEEP-BEEP. The phone company can find no explanation. And so on. The whole thing is connected to sightings of "mothmen" in the small town of Point Pleasant, West Virginia. Does somebody want to scare him from continuing the investigation? The book contains no real answers, and ends abruptly when the Silver Bridge in Point Pleasant collapses, killing 46 people. At that point, Keel is so paranoid and crazy, that he essentially collapses in front of his TV. There, the story ends.

Unless I'm mistaken, Sceptical Enquirer actually named the mysterious dwarf some years ago. The dwarf was a real person, some kind of practical joker and circus artist who knew Keel personally. Apparently, this very real human being was responsible for many of the "paranormal" phenomena detailed by Keel. He drove poor John mad. Of course, Mr. Dwarf couldn't have been behind the mothmen or the collapse of Silver Bridge.

SO WHO KNOWS WHAT ELSE MIGHT BE LURKING OUT THERE...

Last time I heard about Keel was during the 1990's. I believe he was interviewed by Strange Magazine, claiming that the UFO phenomenon was intrinsically EVIL. We have been warned.

Incidentally, the movie "The Mothman Prophecies" has only the flimsiest connection to the book. I suppose that's what Hollywood calls "freely based on a true story".
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is a classic!, 26 Jun 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Mothman Prophecies (Paperback)
I read it first in the 60's and have never forgotten it. I was pleased when it was reprinted as I had wanted to read it again. It holds up surprisingly well. Keel had realized things about the 'UFO phenomena' then that most other researchers are only now beginning to understand. If you have a sense of wonder, get it. If you are a researcher, get it. If you are an open minded skeptic, this will give you a better perspective. If you're just looking for entertainment, it's a lot of fun.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic of the Genre, 3 Sep 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Mothman Prophecies (Paperback)
John Keel is the prototype for the serious investigator of the paranormal. He combines just the right combination of skepticism and open- mindedness, along with a genuine sense of the absurdity yet reality of the situation he's dealing with. This book deals with one of the most famous series of incidents in the annals of Forteana or the paranormal, the "Mothman" incident or incidents which took place in a rural area of West Virginia in late 1966. Keel describes the seemingly unbelievable sequence of events with wry detachment. At the same time he conveys a sense of dread and fear in the face of incidents for which there is no rational explanation. Keel is probably the closest we have to the most famous and probably best chronicler of the strange and bizarre, Charles Fort. More than anything else, this book reminds us of what Shakespeare said, "There are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in your philosophy."
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating account of high strangeness in West Virginia, 8 July 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Mothman Prophecies (Paperback)
This book is a classic of Fortean literature and anyone interested in UFOlogy or the supernatural will find a hugely enjoyable and genuinely scary read.
However, even Keel's most enthusiastic cheerleaders must have some reservations of the accuracy of the reportage. A number of the conclusions that Keel draws are hugely speculative. While the 'aliens' appear able to span intergalactic distances they are also unable to effectively tap phones, dress fashionably or even walk in a straight line.
And no matter how much you love the book, one *must* question the artwork on the cover. A hunky Mothman looks on as a strapping lad pulls hiis buxom lass away from the horrifying apparition. Framed in pea-green. Mmmmmmm!
And a final caveat to all prospective emptors - there is very little prophesy in this book and none from the Mothman himself.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A sane, sober, erudite work., 30 Aug 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Mothman Prophecies (Paperback)
For the time it was written and the timeline of the events it recounts, this book has not dated and will not date. There is humour and tragedy here, and it is real. While during the course of events Keel may have doubted his own sanity, as many would, his insight and analysis predates the findings of Colin Wilson (Alien Dawn) and Kenneth Grant (Outer Gateways) by a quarter of a century. Even with his latter day epilogue recounting the unfortunate hoaxes of his deceased friend Gray Barker the dry humour and quick tongue of this 'raincoated' Marlowe-esque figure (as I can't but help imagining him) hits a nerve.
This book should be essential reading in the relevant departments/schools of universities (I work at London University - so that's qualified!)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wierdness in West Virginia, 23 Jun 2011
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This review is from: The Mothman Prophecies (Paperback)
Anyone who professes an interest in the paranormal should read this book.

Keel takes as his subject the sightings of UFOs and mysterious "mothmen" in and around Point Pleasant, West Virginia in the late 1960's culminating in the catastrophic collapse of a road bridge across the Ohio River and the tragic loss of life in the icy waters beneath just before Christmas 1967.

Much of the text consists of rambling and disjointed accounts of UFO encounters (often several different stories are spewed out in the same block of type without any line break, which is rather disconcerting), and it is the sheer number of these encounters which builds up the tension within the book.

Keel then moves on the chronicle the campaign of petty harassment, phone tapping, and encounters with strange "Men in Black" which many of the UFO witnesses (including Keel himself) were subjected to.

But at the heart of the book are Keel's own unique, compelling theories on the UFO phenomenon. These gems are the best written and most interesting parts of the book. Keel is surprisingly sceptical and very much against the grain of conventional paranormal wisdom (is there any such thing?).

Anyway, if you meet someone who claims to be a UFO buff, ask them what they think about Keel's theories. If they look at you with a blank uncomprehending stare, pick up your drink, walk away, and find someone else to talk to, they clearly know nothing about the subject.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent in style and content, 28 July 2004
This review is from: The Mothman Prophecies (Paperback)
If you're looking for information on the propulsion systems of UFOs, look elsewhere. If your favourite X-Files episode was "Jose Chung's 'It Came from Outer Space'", you will love this book (which has to have influenced the writers of that episode).
The style in which this book is written true to its subject matter. The hundreds of books published about UFO's, ghosts and other paranormal phenomena that attempt to compartmentalise the paranormal within a positivist frame of thinking and attempt to explain "how" and "why". What makes this book stand out is that it does not attempt to pin down and categorise that which science and positivistic thinking cannot explain, but is written in a style that reflects the phenomena it describes - incohesive, discontinuous and without any overall sense or point. It would have worked equally as well (and perhaps better) as a novel, and makes a light and complementary read alongside Eco's "Foucault's Pendulum". In fact I strongly advise those who intend to read both books before they die to read them concurrently, particularly for their addressing of synchronicity (one word - "Lia", oh no I hope They are not reading this!).
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The Mothman Prophecies
The Mothman Prophecies by John A. Keel (Paperback - 7 Mar 2002)
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