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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This book ROCKS!!!!
I LOVED this book but not as much as Santa's 2nd book (The Butterfly Box)
All her books are filled with a magic that stops the reader from putting them down.
I am not your average romantic novel reader but i still enjoy reading all Santa's books; although the one which i enjoyed least was her first (Meet me under the Ombu Tree)
READ THIS BOOK - ITS GREAT!!!
Published on 20 Feb 2004

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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars As luscious as a pot of dulce de leche
Argentina usually evokes romantic images of gauchos, endless fertile pampas, Evita Peron and sultry tango dancers.
Santa Montefiore, however, presents a different aspect in The Forget-Me-Not Sonata, which centres on the Anglo-Argentine community, based in the leafy English suburb of Hurlingham, Buenos Aires.
For one who has never been to South America, this book...
Published on 14 May 2003


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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars As luscious as a pot of dulce de leche, 14 May 2003
By A Customer
Argentina usually evokes romantic images of gauchos, endless fertile pampas, Evita Peron and sultry tango dancers.
Santa Montefiore, however, presents a different aspect in The Forget-Me-Not Sonata, which centres on the Anglo-Argentine community, based in the leafy English suburb of Hurlingham, Buenos Aires.
For one who has never been to South America, this book provided an insight into the colonial existence of the Anglo-Argentine population. One can almost hear the gnashing of the teeth of the elderly ladies - nicknamed “The Crocodiles” - at the Hurlingham Club (akin to a senior version of the Polo Club in London?), and the clinking of china teacups as Earl Grey and malicious gossip are exchanged. Nobody in this sheltered community is spared the intense scrutiny of these almost reptilian ladies.
Having thoroughly enjoyed Meet Me Under the Ombu Tree, I was eager to read The Forget-Me-Not Sonata: it is essentially a story of true love and of unbridled passion, forbidden but never forgotten.
Following a family tragedy, Audrey Garnet forsakes her love for the eccentric Louis Forrester, marrying his dashing elder brother, Cecil, a decorated war hero and a perfect gentleman, who would be categorized as “every mother’s dream” son-in-law.
In spite of passing years, Audrey never forgets her passion for Louis, the strains of the Forget-Me-Not sonata he composed for her wafting eerily in and out of her life. Audrey is one who can “always be relied upon to do what is right”. However, one can sense Audrey’s frustration and at times contempt for herself for conforming to what is expected of her, instead of following her heart.

Having attended an English boarding school myself, I could relate only too well to the horror of the first night at Colehurst House spent by Audrey’s daughters. The raw emotion described here is particularly poignant.
Of course, no Argentinean story would be complete without reference to the seductive tango, set in the smoky taverns of the cobbled streets of Palermo.
Despite the vivid descriptions and rich sentiment, I was somewhat disappointed by this book overall. I found it hard to empathize with Audrey, who is taunted by her undying love for Louis Forrester. Yet she is incapable of seeing the flaws in her over-indulged and pampered children, especially the plainly evil Alicia. For this reason, Audrey does not earn my sympathy. Many readers will know of manipulative and selfish creatures such as Alicia, who despite their magnetic allure, are heartless and detestable. It is indeed true that “you can’t hide an ugly nature behind a beautiful face”
Not much is made of the apparently “too good to be true” Cecil Forrester, and it seems that he never receives the love and appreciation he so richly deserves. He is a gentleman of such nobility that others pale in comparison. At the same time, his emotional distance from his family and sense of duty make it difficult for the reader to side with him entirely.
The author introduces exotic and unusual characters, such as Marcel, the French painter; and the gypsy boy, Florien, whose humiliation at the hands of Alicia is surpassed only by his primitive feelings towards her, alternating between loathing and pure animal lust.
Whilst The Forget-Me-Not Sonata is at times as rich and as luscious as a pot of creamy dulce de leche, it is also as cloying. The pace is slow and I found many of the characters to be frustrating at best: none of them are developed to their full potential. This is clearly not one of the author’s best works.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This book ROCKS!!!!, 20 Feb 2004
By A Customer
I LOVED this book but not as much as Santa's 2nd book (The Butterfly Box)
All her books are filled with a magic that stops the reader from putting them down.
I am not your average romantic novel reader but i still enjoy reading all Santa's books; although the one which i enjoyed least was her first (Meet me under the Ombu Tree)
READ THIS BOOK - ITS GREAT!!!
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Thin plot and cardboard charecters, 12 Sep 2005
Audrey, beautiful, good, etc etc falls for the wrong brother, feckless Louis who "didn't fight in the war" instead of his noble, reliable elder brother Cecil. (No notice taken of the fact that conscription existed in Britain for all young men and even if Louis didn't fight due to having a 'psychotic' breakdown he'd have been drafted into doing something else for the war effort). There's a family tragedy, Audrey decides she can't upset her family by eloping with Louis quite now, he departs in a huff and she marries the good, dull Cecil.
Yes there is more plot, amply spun out by great wodges of padding such as the descriptions of what happens to Audrey's children at school which have little to do with what has got to be the main theme of the book - will she ever get together with Louis or find peace and happiness in her life?
None of this would matter so much if this was a better crafted book but unfortunately all the charecters seem to have come out of central casting, serious, good Audrey, her prettier, naughty sister; tormented talented (of course) Louis; steady Cecil who (naturally) doesn't understand his wife's artistic yearnings, the twins, one plain and good, the other beautiful and evil...etc etc. The time span of the book is from the 40's to the 80's and yet there is no sense of period whatsoever apart from mentions of Eva Peron's face on posters in the early sections, no references to clothes, cars, current events or even hairstyles apart from describing Audrey and Isla's "corkscrew curls" - another central casting cliche.
Descriptions are used over and over again - I lost count of how many times the writer referred to the 'fat ponies' grazing in the paddocks in front of the twins' school (and no headmistress of a private school in the 60's would ever have told a new parent to call her by her christian name).
There was also some very lazy editing eg 'she was disappoint' not disappointed. Charecters appeared with no introduction so the reader was left wondering who they were and even the "crocodiles" a group of elderly ladies who ran the local club and the best drawn collection in the book seem to waver amongst themselves, for instance Cynthia who is initally described as being the kinddest of the lot makes distinctly bitchy remarks on one scene.
And what was with the names? Audrey's father, dead uncle, live uncle and dead brother in law are called Henry, Harry, Hubert and Hugh. Confusing or what? And Cecil's sister (not a twin) is Cicely...
Not reccomended at all. If you want a light easy read try JoJo Moyes.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A very disappointing read, 6 Jun 2005
By A Customer
I had high hopes for this author. After all she has been compared to one of my favourite authors,Rosamund Pilcher. Unfortunately I could see no resemblance in this book. I wanted to like her characters but found the main characters unsympathetic and the heroine made me want to scream -- grow up, get on with it, make a decision. And would a hero really behave how Louis had behaved? Was it wise to have such an immature and unbalanced hero? Or was the true hero, the heroine's long suffering husband? Although the Argentine background had intrigued me and I assume they are authentically done, given the author's background, I found the bits in England dull and uninspiring. I continued reading the book, despite the great temptation to through it against the wall, hoping against hope that some how it would become less plodding and the characters more interesting, that somewhere I would discover the spark that led a reviewer to compare this woman to Rosamunde Pilcher. Nothing and I am at loss to discover why she was compared to her.
Perhaps the author's other books are much better, but this one failed to hold my interest.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Another great read form Santa Montefiore, 6 Nov 2013
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A great story of life in Argentina and England, The author draws on her own knowledge of life in those countries which adds a great deal to her wonderful storytelling. I have read almost all her books and I am never dissapointed.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't put it down., 7 Oct 2013
Brilliant story with a good twist. Couldn't sleep until I had finished it. Well worth reading, brilliant author. Loved it.
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3.0 out of 5 stars forget me not sonata, 1 Sep 2013
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As a fan of the author I found it a bit disappionting
Having siad that I am still reading the novel
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5.0 out of 5 stars Gift for mum, 24 Aug 2013
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Berenice Hickey "Berenice" (Singapore) - See all my reviews
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Bought it for 85 year old mum as she loves the author. She thoroughly enjoyed it! A thoroughly enjoyable read!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Another top story from Santa Montefiore, 20 Aug 2013
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"unputdownable" Predictable to an extent, but a brilliant holiday read. Up to her normal standard and I would thoroughly recommend
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5.0 out of 5 stars Forget me not sonata, 19 Aug 2013
A bit slow to start, but then couldn't put it down. Beautifully written! Mystical qualities. Another wonderful read from Santa Montefiore.
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The Forget-me-not Sonata
The Forget-me-not Sonata by Santa Montefiore (Paperback - 27 Oct 2003)
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