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37 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Silent Stones - The new Celestine Prophecy?
I've read Diana Cooper's books for years and have thoroughly enjoyed watching her progress from a sort of life coach to her present philosophy - a much more esoteric and metaphysical way of thinking. Some authors of factual books don't translate very well to novels but Diana is an exception to this rule. I liken The Silent Stones to The Celestine Prophecy because it is...
Published on 30 Jan. 2003 by Amazon Customer

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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but not literary excellence.
I have read some of Cooper's more "formal" books and wondered how she would handle a novel. I was initially impressed to see that she managed to put together a pretty substantial plot and weave in some interesting spiritual teachings but I'm afraid I found that her style was too amateurish to be enjoyed. Some of the expressions/metaphors had me cringing! Sorry Diana...
Published on 23 Nov. 2003 by BeeBee


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37 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Silent Stones - The new Celestine Prophecy?, 30 Jan. 2003
By 
Amazon Customer "cool gran" (Derbyshire, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
I've read Diana Cooper's books for years and have thoroughly enjoyed watching her progress from a sort of life coach to her present philosophy - a much more esoteric and metaphysical way of thinking. Some authors of factual books don't translate very well to novels but Diana is an exception to this rule. I liken The Silent Stones to The Celestine Prophecy because it is essentially putting across the same message - that there are those amongst us whose purpose is to lead the world into love and light and that, once the critical mass of "light-workers"is reached, we will all automatically become better people.
To be honest, the only thing that kept me reading the Celestine Prophecy was that I got interested in the message and wanted to see what the spiritual laws were about. The actual writing I found quite excrutiating but I soldiered on to the end and was glad I did because I did finally get the point. Diana's novel is different. The writing is excellent and the story gripped me from the start. She was obviously guided to write in novel form in order to reach a wider market, since she would, essentially, be preaching to the converted if she had written it in her usual way. I was loathe to put it down and it was one of those books that you want to know the ending but you don't want it to end. It left me thinking that there is hope for this crazy world of ours after all and I can't wait for critical mass to be reached!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Little Light on 'The Silent Stones'., 10 July 2002
By 
Brian-in-Bewdley (Worcestershire, UK) - See all my reviews
Having already read a couple of Diana Cooper's works on Angels and Spiritual Laws, I was quite keen to see how she would handle a novel. My first thought, on reading the cover blurb, was that The Silent Stones contained themes and elements reminiscent of James Redfield's 'Celestine Prophecy'. For example, the narrative follows a small group of individuals who meet by 'chance', and suddenly find themselves in possession of a sacred scroll which, when deciphered, will reveal the seven Great Mysteries that inform the spiritual laws governing our planet (cf Redfield's 'Insights').
The group is very quickly targetted by baddies who, starting in India, track them closely across three continents as the novel progresses. After India, the main nodal points are Stonehenge, and then Mount Shasta (California), the whole culminating in a final showdown at Machu Picchu in Peru. (More echoes of Redfield here). Each 'chance' event or meeting along the way is revealed as one of the synchronicities which govern the universe - the notion that there is in fact no such thing as chance or coincidence - that everything in the universe, meaningful or banal, is choreographed to provide a given outcome: that the universe is, indeed, a giant and (very) complex computer. (Shades of Redfield.)
As new characters are introduced, we are led to ask ourselves 'Can we trust this person? Are they on the side of the angels, or ... what?'. So, an element of suspense is offered which, along with the very close pursuit by the known bad guys, keeps us turning the pages to see what happens next. There is also (of course) a boy-meets-girl theme, which is introduced within the first few pages, but which develops oh-so-delicately, only coming to a head towards the finale.
Although 'The Silent Stones' presents as a novel, much of the spiritual detail it contains, and its insights into the true origins of Stonehenge and Machu Picchu, originate from Diana Cooper's awareness of, and close cooperation with angelic and spiritual beings. The novel is NOT a 'me-too' of Redfield's work, and such similarities as there are serve to underline the central themes which run through much spiritual teaching.
I would not hesitate to recommend 'The Silent Stones' to anyone who is interested in spiritual insights - or indeed who isn't, yet. As Diana herself has said, the novel might serve to introduce people to the spiritual laws of the universe - people who might never dream of picking up a book which more obviously and openly speaks of the angelic and esoteric influences in our lives. The events certainly transformed the perspective of one of the central characters - from recently-made-redundant young exec., to fully-committed right-brain-oriented spiritual groupie. Much like myself, I guess!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars stimulating spiritual content, 19 Jun. 2004
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I couldn't put this book down.I don't usually read fiction and the story is the not the main event here but merely the framework for some interesting ideas about Atlantis,the role of Stonehenge,power places etc.I did enjoy it because I think a book teaching spiritual ideas and lessons does not have to stuffy and intellectual.Many people will enjoy this from a wide range of readers.
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Little Light on The Silent Stones, 15 July 2002
By 
Brian-in-Bewdley (Worcestershire, UK) - See all my reviews
Having already read a couple of Diana Cooper's works on Angels and Spiritual Laws, I was quite keen to see how she would handle a novel. My first thought, on reading the cover blurb, was that The Silent Stones contained themes and elements reminiscent of James Redfield's 'Celestine Prophecy'. For example, the narrative follows a small group of individuals who meet by 'chance', and suddenly find themselves in possession of a sacred scroll which, when deciphered, will reveal the seven Great Mysteries that reveal the spiritual laws governing our planet (cf Redfield's 'Insights').
The group is very quickly targetted by baddies, who track them closely across three continents throughout the course of the novel, starting in India. From there, the main nodal points are Stonehenge, then Mount Shasta (California), the whole culminating in a final showdown at Machu Picchu in Peru. (More echoes of Redfield here). Each 'chance' event, or meeting, is revealed as one of the synchronicities which govern the universe - the notion that there is no such thing as chance or coincidence - that everything in the universe, meaningful or banal, is choreographed to provide a given outcome: that the universe is, indeed, a giant and (very) complex computer. (Shades of Redfield.)
As new characters are introduced, we are led to ask ourselves 'Can we trust this person? Are they on the side of the angels, or ... what?'. So, an element of suspense is offered which, with the close pursuit of the known bad guys, keeps us turning the pages to see what happens next. There is also (of course) a boy-meets-girl theme, which is introduced within the first few pages, but which develops oh-so-delicately, only 'coming out' towards the finale.
Although 'The Silent Stones' presents as a novel, much of the spiritual detail it contains, and its insights into the true origins of Stonehenge and Machu Picchu, originate from Diana Cooper's awareness of, and close cooperation with angelic and spiritual beings. The novel is NOT a 'me-too' of Redfield's work, and such similarities as there are serve to underline the central themes which run through much spiritual teaching.
I would not hesitate to recommend 'The Silent Stones' to anyone who is interested in spiritual insights - or indeed who isn't, yet. As Diana herself has said, the novel might serve to introduce people to the spiritual laws of the universe - people who might never dream of picking up a book which more obviously and openly speaks of the angelic and esoteric influences in our lives. The events certainly transformed the perspective of one of the central characters - from recently-made-redundant young exec., to fully-committed right-brain-oriented spiritual groupie. Much like myself, I guess!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Really Enjoyed It., 2 Aug. 2002
By A Customer
I agree with the other reviewer who says that the book has similarities to the Celestine Prophecy. It definitely does. It does not copy, but rather reinforces some of the theories in the Celestine Prophecy.
The book conveys important messages in the form of an adventure story. I enjoyed reading it and found it hard to put down, and it really made me think about what is really happening in the world and what is illusion versus reality. It is one of those books that you want to read multiple times to continually reinforce the messages within your own life.
I highly recommend the book.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but not literary excellence., 23 Nov. 2003
This review is from: The Silent Stones: A Spiritual Adventure (Paperback)
I have read some of Cooper's more "formal" books and wondered how she would handle a novel. I was initially impressed to see that she managed to put together a pretty substantial plot and weave in some interesting spiritual teachings but I'm afraid I found that her style was too amateurish to be enjoyed. Some of the expressions/metaphors had me cringing! Sorry Diana. Having said that, her goal was to introduce spiritual teachings to a wider audience and I’m sure she’s done that. For those who are fans of Diana already – I don’t think they’ll be disappointed and in fact the book helps make her teachings more realistic as you see how they can be put into practice in everyday situations. Don’t read this book if you are expecting real suspense and action – it’s not that sort of a novel. Do read it, if you are looking to further your beliefs concerning the universe – it will make you question the whole spiritual way of things which is what she wanted and which is what I feel she achieves.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars brilliant!, 21 July 2013
By 
J. Foster "yazmazminal" (Cheltenham, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Silent Stones: A Spiritual Adventure (Paperback)
Couldn't put this book down. would make a great film too! Have a number of Diana's books but this foray into fiction is a triumph in interweaving spiritual knowledge and insights with an exciting tale and realistic characters. Although they do seem to have quite a lot if money to be able to travel as they do!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars very interesting, 10 May 2012
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This review is from: The Silent Stones: A Spiritual Adventure (Paperback)
loved it was a story but touched on some spiritual believes touched on power of thought, karma and many more explained in a very down to earth way so you are learning and thinking of new concepts while enjoying reading a story. good food for thought.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I had to visit Stonehenge after this, 18 Dec. 2011
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This review is from: The Silent Stones: A Spiritual Adventure (Paperback)
A fascinating start to the trilogy of spiritual novels sets out much wisdom & information in an easy to grasp way, it tells of the polarities of personalities in the world - the characters have elements of 'real' people those that are trying to be positive 'Helen'(based on diana)for example and those that are born feeling evil due to where they are in their evolution & are being negative by calling on dark energy 'sturov' is a world famous british billionaire who's business we have all heard of(with a finger in every pie)this is the reality of the world you live in- will evil get its way or (as is happening now) will positivity win the day...all are equal and yet the positive has a more powerful charge than the negative...call on the power of the light~
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars addictive!, 29 May 2014
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a favourite of mine- I could not put this down! Would definitely recommend to those who like to be transported to different places around the globe!
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The Silent Stones: A Spiritual Adventure
The Silent Stones: A Spiritual Adventure by Diana Cooper (Paperback - 13 Oct. 2003)
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