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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lewis really inspires you with the effects of the Internet.
On first glance this book is a bunch of tales about crazy things that have happened on the Internet. Such as the teenager that made $800,000 on stocks by giving stock-buying advice. Or the teenager that gives out legal advice and is bestowed more praise than the 100 certified lawyers that also give advice at a particular newsgroup. But this is not a freak show like Jerry...
Published on 4 Aug 2001 by Mr. D. Read

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting read - but nothing special
This book is like the TV series - quite interesting at the time but instantly forgetable. The book is actually a collection of short stories about young people who have used the Internet in unusual ways. Most of the stories are interesting - but some are not! There's a much better book in Michael Lewis than this - he hints at it when he discusses politics, the fall of...
Published on 16 Aug 2001 by Bobby Elliott


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting read - but nothing special, 16 Aug 2001
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Bobby Elliott (Erskine, UK) - See all my reviews
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This book is like the TV series - quite interesting at the time but instantly forgetable. The book is actually a collection of short stories about young people who have used the Internet in unusual ways. Most of the stories are interesting - but some are not! There's a much better book in Michael Lewis than this - he hints at it when he discusses politics, the fall of Communism and the New World Order. But this one is OK - if you want to read a few interesting anecdotes about the Internet. Wait for the paperback.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lewis really inspires you with the effects of the Internet., 4 Aug 2001
On first glance this book is a bunch of tales about crazy things that have happened on the Internet. Such as the teenager that made $800,000 on stocks by giving stock-buying advice. Or the teenager that gives out legal advice and is bestowed more praise than the 100 certified lawyers that also give advice at a particular newsgroup. But this is not a freak show like Jerry Springer with a shallow 'moral' highlighted - this goes much deeper. It examines each of the cases with a highly intelligent and searching eye, cast much wider that these isolated cases and gives a convincing commentary on what *social* changes are going on, made possible by the Internet. The later chapters are absolutely rivetting as Lewis filters the evidence with a healthy cynism and conservatism, before coming to convincing, but daunting ideas and conclusions of where we are heading. For instance, in this Knowledge Economy, where your brain is your biggest asset (instead of braun in the agricultural revolution, or capital in the industrial revolution), Lewis suggests that our working careers are will be like a professional sports person - ends at 30 when you are too attached to old ideas to innovate. If you saw the TV series and enjoyed that, then the book really gets into a lot more exciting detail and convincing commentary. A fab read cover to cover, even for non-techies.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Look to history to look to the future, 25 Sep 2012
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Stephen Green (Uttoxeter, Staffs. UK) - See all my reviews
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One of the hardest types of books to write is about the recent past and its effect on the future. Michael Lewis is an accomplished writer with an eye for significant events. There are just four chapters : The financial revolt, pyramids and pancakes, The revolt of the masses and The unabomber had a point. At first glance it may seem pointless reading a ten year old book even if it is now cheap as chips. I would maintain it is still relevant. As I write the world is in a period of financial uncertainty to put it mildly. There are businesses which whether structured as pyramids or pancakes, are finding that old rules and formulas just aren't working with the same results.The masses are definately revolting both in democracies and dictatorships. A big focus in the last chapter is about a small irish town that campaigned strongly for broadband connections, instinctiviely knowing that they could not afford to stay stuck in the past. Michael Lewis teaches you to see the significance of the changes in society and technology that are fast shaping our futures. If you already own this book I hope I have encouraged you to re read it.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This one got me thinking..., 19 Aug 2001
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M. Watts (Kent, UK) - See all my reviews
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Thought provoking - even for someone like me who works in the industry. Lewis' views on the Internet world compare to the style of his writing in Liars Poker, where he mixes humour with astute perceptions. A good read - even for the 'outsider' (or should that be 'insider')??
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Definately worth a read., 14 Aug 2001
Lovely - A great study of the social impact of the internet to date. Definately worth a read.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb, 8 Aug 2001
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Michael Lewis has an intriguing thesis: that whereas in the past the world has been run by mature adults, it is now in the grip of adolescent technophiles. A superlative dissection of the consequences of Net-mania. Highly recommended.
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